Special Issue "Coupling of Building Components and Ventilation Systems"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Alireza Afshari
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of the Built Environment, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark
Interests: ventilation; indoor climate; energy; district heating; energy storage; control; building
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In residential buildings, heat loss through the building envelope is dominant and, consequently, energy is required for supplying heat. In commercial buildings, however, the removal of surplus heat and of airborne pollutants is dominant and, consequently, energy is required for air treatment. Insulated windows and constructions in combination with energy-efficient technical building installations and integration of energy production using, e.g., solar panels, supply new technical solutions for reducing heat and electricity use in buildings. Energy efficiency is considered not only in terms of reduced energy use but also in terms of management and optimization of energy use in time, e.g., through the use of Smart Grids and bidirectional district low-temperature heating and high-temperature cooling systems. On the building level, energy-efficient solutions comprise room-based control of demand systems combining ventilation and heating together with systems combining ventilation, phase change materials, and renewable energy sources. Air cleaning solutions comprise technologies for the removal of both particles and gases, considering indoor air quality and the protection of the ventilation systems.

Prof. Alireza Afshari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ventilation
  • Building components
  • Energy
  • Energy efficiency
  • Building installations

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Ducted Photovoltaic Façade Unit with Buoyancy Cooling: Part II CFD Simulation
Buildings 2019, 9(5), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9050133 - 24 May 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1979
Abstract
A ducted photovoltaic façade (DPV) unit was simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is Part II of the study, which is a repetition of Part I—a previous experimental study of the ducted photovoltaic unit with buoyancy cooling. The aim of this study [...] Read more.
A ducted photovoltaic façade (DPV) unit was simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is Part II of the study, which is a repetition of Part I—a previous experimental study of the ducted photovoltaic unit with buoyancy cooling. The aim of this study is to optimize the duct width behind the solar cells to allow for the cells to achieve maximum buoyancy-driven cooling during operation. Duct widths from 5 to 50 cm were simulated. A duct width of 40 cm allowed for the maximum calculated heat to be removed from the duct; however, the lowest cell-operating temperature was reported for a duct width of 50 cm. The results showed that the change in temperature (ΔT) between the ducts’ inlets and outlets ranged from 8.10 to 19.32 °C. The ducted system enhanced module efficiency by 12.69% by reducing the photovoltaic façade (PV) temperature by 27 °C from 100 to 73 °C, as opposed to the increased temperatures that have been reported when fixing the PV directly onto the building fabric. The maximum simulated heat recovered from the ducted PV system was 529 W. This was 47.98% of the incident radiation in the test. The total summation of heat recovered and the power enhanced by the ducted system was 61.67%. The nature of airflow inside the duct was explored and visualized by reference to the Grashof number (Gr) and CFD simulations, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coupling of Building Components and Ventilation Systems)
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Article
A Ducted Photovoltaic Façade Unit with Buoyancy Cooling: Part I Experiment
Buildings 2019, 9(4), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9040088 - 18 Apr 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1678
Abstract
A ducted photovoltaic façade (DPV) unit was studied using experimental prototype and simulated in a full scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The study comes in two parts; this is Part I, as detailed in the title above, and Part II is titled [...] Read more.
A ducted photovoltaic façade (DPV) unit was studied using experimental prototype and simulated in a full scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The study comes in two parts; this is Part I, as detailed in the title above, and Part II is titled “A Ducted Photovoltaic Façade Unit with Buoyancy Cooling: Part II CFD Simulation”. The process adopted in the experimental study is replicated in the simulation part. The aim was to optimize the duct width behind the solar cells to allow for a maximum buoyancy-driven cooling for the cells during operation. Duct widths from 5 to 50 cm were tested in a prototype. A duct width of 45 cm had the maximum calculated heat removed from the duct; however, the lowest cell-operating temperature was reported for duct width of 50 cm. It was found that ΔT between ducts’ inlets and outlets range from 5.47 °C to 12.32 °C for duct widths of 5–50 cm, respectively. The ducted system enhanced module efficiency by 12.69% by reducing photovoltaic (PV) temperature by 27 °C from 100 °C to 73 °C. The maximum measured heat recovered from the ducted PV system was 422 W. This is 48.98% from the incident radiation in the test. The total sum of heat recovered and power enhanced by the ducted system was 61.67%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coupling of Building Components and Ventilation Systems)
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