Special Issue "Novel Optofluidic Manipulation and Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical and Photonic Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2023 | Viewed by 1893

Special Issue Editors

College of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518061, China
Interests: novel optical tweezers; optothermal manipulation techniques; optofluidics; surface plasmon resonance sensors
Institution of Nanophotonics, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Interests: optical manipulation and detection; biophoton devices and biosensors; biological micro-motor and nano biological robot; plasmon nano detection inside cells
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As an emerging interdisciplinary topic, optofluidics combines the unique properties of photonic energy and microfluidic systems for addressing a range of problems in the micro-/nano-scale relevant to the fields of biology, chemistry, and physical sciences. Examples of optofluidics include particle manipulation through trapping or localized heating, optically actuated microfluidics, controllable microfluidic lenses, micro-reactors, etc. Especially, it has contributed a lot to the application of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. This Special Issue aims to publish state-of-the-art original articles and comprehensive reviews covering novel optofluidic manipulation techniques and SPR biosensors. Contributions may include different aspects in terms of novel design, fabrication, chemistry, analysis, applications perspectives, and so on.

The topics that will be covered include (but are not limited to):

  • Novel optical tweezers;
  • Novel optofluidic manipulation techniques;
  • Optothermal-assisted manipulation techniques;
  • Trapping and sensing schemes;
  • Surface plasmon resonance sensors;
  • Fiber-based surface plasmon resonance sensors;
  • Single-molecule detection techniques;
  • Novel optical imaging and sensing systems;
  • Novel lab-on-a-chip devices;
  • Novel optofludic nano-robots.

Dr. Jiajie Chen
Prof. Dr. Hongbao Xin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • novel optical tweezers
  • biophoton devices and biosensors
  • biological micro/nano-robot
  • optofluidics
  • surface plasmon resonance sensors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Surface Plasmon Resonance Microscopy Based on Total Internal Reflection
Biosensors 2023, 13(2), 261; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13020261 - 12 Feb 2023
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Abstract
Surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) has been widely employed in biological fields because of its high spatial resolution and label-free detection modality. In this study, SPRM based on total internal reflection (TIR) is studied via a home-built SPRM system, and the principle of [...] Read more.
Surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) has been widely employed in biological fields because of its high spatial resolution and label-free detection modality. In this study, SPRM based on total internal reflection (TIR) is studied via a home-built SPRM system, and the principle of imaging of a single nanoparticle is analyzed as well. By designing a ring filter and combining it with the deconvolution algorithm in Fourier space, the parabolic tail of the nanoparticle image is removed, in which a spatial resolution of 248 nm is obtained. In addition, we also measured the specific binding between the human IgG antigen and goat anti-human IgG antibody using the TIR-based SPRM. The experimental results have proved that the system can image sparse nanoparticles and monitor biomolecular interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Optofluidic Manipulation and Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing)
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Review

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Review
An Overview on Coinage Metal Nanocluster-Based Luminescent Biosensors via Etching Chemistry
Biosensors 2022, 12(7), 511; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12070511 - 11 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 899
Abstract
The findings from the synthetic mechanism of metal nanoclusters yield the etching chemistry based on coinage metal nanoclusters. The utilization of such chemistry as a tool that can alter the optical properties of metal nanoclusters has inspired the development of a series of [...] Read more.
The findings from the synthetic mechanism of metal nanoclusters yield the etching chemistry based on coinage metal nanoclusters. The utilization of such chemistry as a tool that can alter the optical properties of metal nanoclusters has inspired the development of a series of emerging luminescent biosensors. Compared with other sensors, the luminescent biosensors have the advantages of being more sensitive, saving time and saving cost. We reviewed topics on the luminescent sensors based on the etching of emissive coinage metal nanoclusters. The molecules possessing varied etching ability towards metal nanoclusters were categorized with discussions of corresponding etching mechanisms. The understanding of etching mechanisms favored the discussions of how to use etching methods to detecting biochemical molecules. The emerging luminescent biosensors via etching chemistry also provided challenges and new opportunities for analytical chemistry and sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Optofluidic Manipulation and Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing)
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