Micro/Nanofluidic Devices for Biomedical Applications

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors and Healthcare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 8135

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, 4111 Brisbane, Australia
Interests: microfluidics; biomicrofluidics; lab-on-a-chip; tumour-on-a-chip
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The current pandemic we are facing around the world signifies the importance of the development of more robust techniques for early stage diagnosis of pathogens. Accordingly, the synergistic integration of microfluidics with biosensors can significantly increase the portability, sensitivity, and selectivity of such platforms.

This Special Issue of Biosensors covers recent advances in the design, fabrication, and characterization of various micro/nanofluidic devices for biomedical applications. Submissions of research and review papers addressing all types of micro/nanofluidic devices especially wearable/flexible microfluidic sensors for point-of-care testing and healthcare monitoring, are highly encouraged. Furthermore, this Special Issue will focus on research articles and critical review papers that present in-depth insights into physics, device engineering, manufacturing techniques, and materials of micro/nanofluidic devices for various biological and medical applications. 

Dr. Navid Kashaninejad
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microfluidic biosensors
  • microneedle-based monitoring
  • electrochemical-based microfluidics
  • lab-on-a-chip diagnosis
  • PCR-based microfluidics
  • ELISA-on-a-chip

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 13633 KiB  
Article
Enhancing the Accuracy of Measuring DEP Force Applied on Cells by Considering the Friction Effect
by Alireza Khouzestani, Yousef Hojjat, Marziyeh Tavalaee, Hesam Sadeghian and Mohammad Hossein Nasr-Esfahani
Biosensors 2023, 13(5), 540; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13050540 - 12 May 2023
Viewed by 1519
Abstract
The Dielectrophoresis (DEP) phenomenon has been widely used for cell separation in recent years. The experimental measurement of the DEP force is one of the concerns of scientists. This research presents a novel method for more accurately measuring the DEP force. The innovation [...] Read more.
The Dielectrophoresis (DEP) phenomenon has been widely used for cell separation in recent years. The experimental measurement of the DEP force is one of the concerns of scientists. This research presents a novel method for more accurately measuring the DEP force. The innovation of this method is considered the friction effect, which has been neglected in previous studies. For this purpose, first, the direction of the microchannel was aligned with the electrodes. As there was no DEP force in this direction, the release force of the cells caused by the fluid flow equaled the friction force between the cells and the substrate. Then, the microchannel was aligned perpendicular to the direction of the electrodes, and the release force was measured. The net DEP force was obtained by the difference between the release forces of these two alignments. In the experimental tests, the DEP force, when applied to the sperm and white blood cell (WBC), was measured. The WBC was used to validate the presented method. The experimental results showed that the forces applied by DEP to WBC and human sperm were 42 pN and 3 pN, respectively. On the other hand, with the conventional method, these figures were as high as 72 pN and 4 pN due to neglecting the friction force. The compression between the simulation results in COMSOL Multiphysics and the experiments determined the new approach to be valid and capable of use in any cell, such as sperm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro/Nanofluidic Devices for Biomedical Applications)
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Review

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33 pages, 8525 KiB  
Review
Signal-Based Methods in Dielectrophoresis for Cell and Particle Separation
by Malihe Farasat, Ehsan Aalaei, Saeed Kheirati Ronizi, Atin Bakhshi, Shaghayegh Mirhosseini, Jun Zhang, Nam-Trung Nguyen and Navid Kashaninejad
Biosensors 2022, 12(7), 510; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12070510 - 11 Jul 2022
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 6013
Abstract
Separation and detection of cells and particles in a suspension are essential for various applications, including biomedical investigations and clinical diagnostics. Microfluidics realizes the miniaturization of analytical devices by controlling the motion of a small volume of fluids in microchannels and microchambers. Accordingly, [...] Read more.
Separation and detection of cells and particles in a suspension are essential for various applications, including biomedical investigations and clinical diagnostics. Microfluidics realizes the miniaturization of analytical devices by controlling the motion of a small volume of fluids in microchannels and microchambers. Accordingly, microfluidic devices have been widely used in particle/cell manipulation processes. Different microfluidic methods for particle separation include dielectrophoretic, magnetic, optical, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and chemical techniques. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a method for manipulating polarizable particles’ trajectories in non-uniform electric fields using unique dielectric characteristics. It provides several advantages for dealing with neutral bioparticles owing to its sensitivity, selectivity, and noninvasive nature. This review provides a detailed study on the signal-based DEP methods that use the applied signal parameters, including frequency, amplitude, phase, and shape for cell/particle separation and manipulation. Rather than employing complex channels or time-consuming fabrication procedures, these methods realize sorting and detecting the cells/particles by modifying the signal parameters while using a relatively simple device. In addition, these methods can significantly impact clinical diagnostics by making low-cost and rapid separation possible. We conclude the review by discussing the technical and biological challenges of DEP techniques and providing future perspectives in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro/Nanofluidic Devices for Biomedical Applications)
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