Special Issue "Biosensors for Detection of Lipids, Carbohydrates and Complex Biomarkers of Disease"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Harshini Mukundan
Website
Guest Editor
Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biological detection has centered around proteins and nucleic acids as targets for several decades. However, many biomarkers associated with human physiological processes and infectious diseases are lipidated sugars, which have an amphiphilic biochemistry. Traditionally, these molecules are also detected using methods that were tailored for proteins, such as immunoassays. However, the physiological presentation of these molecules, their bioanlytical characterization and biophysical properties are very much driven by their biochemistry. In this Special Issue of Biosensors, we invite manuscripts that address the development use of biosensors for the detection, characterization, quantification and exploration of amphiphilic biomarkers.

Dr. Harshini Mukundan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Multiplex Label Free Characterization of Cancer Cell Lines Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging
Biosensors 2019, 9(2), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9020070 - 27 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Rapid multiplex cell surface marker analysis can expedite investigations in which large number of antigens need to be analyzed. Simultaneous analysis of multiple surface antigens at the same level of sensitivity is however limited in the current golden standard analysis method, flow cytometry. [...] Read more.
Rapid multiplex cell surface marker analysis can expedite investigations in which large number of antigens need to be analyzed. Simultaneous analysis of multiple surface antigens at the same level of sensitivity is however limited in the current golden standard analysis method, flow cytometry. In this paper we introduce a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi)-based technique for 44-plex parameter analysis using a single sample, in less than 20 min. We analyzed the expression on cells from five different cancer cell lines by SPRi on a 44-plex antibody array including 4 negative controls and compared the output with flow cytometry. The combined correlation of the markers that showed expression by flow cytometry was 0.76. The results demonstrate as a proof of principle that SPRi can be applied for rapid semi-quantitative multiplex cell surface marker analysis. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Electrochemical Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Corresponds to Cell Viability upon Exposure to Dioclea reflexa Seed Extracts and Antifungal Drugs
Biosensors 2019, 9(1), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9010045 - 20 Mar 2019
Abstract
Dioclea reflexa bioactive compounds have been shown to contain antioxidant properties. The extracts from the same plant are used in traditional medical practices to treat various diseases with impressive outcomes. In this study, ionic mobility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in the presence of [...] Read more.
Dioclea reflexa bioactive compounds have been shown to contain antioxidant properties. The extracts from the same plant are used in traditional medical practices to treat various diseases with impressive outcomes. In this study, ionic mobility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in the presence of D. reflexa seed extracts was monitored using electrochemical detection methods to link cell death to ionic imbalance. Cells treated with ethanol, methanol, and water extracts were studied using cyclic voltammetry and cell counting to correlate electrochemical behavior and cell viability, respectively. The results were compared with cells treated with pore-forming Amphotericin b (Amp b), as well as Fluconazole (Flu) and the antimicrobial drug Rifampicin (Rif). The D. reflexa seed water extract (SWE) revealed higher anodic peak current with 58% cell death. Seed methanol extract (SME) and seed ethanol extract (SEE) recorded 31% and 22% cell death, respectively. Among the three control drugs, Flu revealed the highest cell death of about 64%, whereas Amp b and Rif exhibited cell deaths of 35% and 16%, respectively, after 8 h of cell growth. It was observed that similar to SWE, there was an increase in the anodic peak current in the presence of different concentrations of Amp b, which also correlated with enhanced cell death. It was concluded from this observation that Amp b and SWE might follow similar mechanisms to inhibit cell growth. Thus, the individual bioactive compounds from the water extracts of D. reflexa seeds could further be purified and tested to validate their potential therapeutic application. The strategy to link electrochemical behavior to biochemical responses could be a simple, fast, and robust screening technique for new drug targets and to understand the mechanism of action of such drugs against disease models. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop