Special Issue "Selected Papers from NanoBio&Med 2017"

A special issue of Biomimetics (ISSN 2313-7673).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Josep Samitier
Website
Guest Editor
1. Nanobioengineering group, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Baldiri Reixac 10-12, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
2. Department of Engineering: Electronics, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
3. Networking Biomedical Research Center (CIBER), Spain
Interests: Surface functionalization; Engineering cell–material interface; Biosensors and lab on a chips; Microfluidics; 3D Bioprinting and 3D Cell culture; Organ-on-a-chip engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dipl.-Ing. Dr.techn. Dietmar Pum
Website
Guest Editor
Biophysics Institute, Vienna, Austria
Interests: scanning force microscopy; Langmuir–Blodgett techniques; biosensorics; electron microscopy; digital image processing; S-layers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Emerging nanobiotechnologies can offer solutions to current and future challenges in medicine. By covering topics from regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, drug delivery, bionanofabrication, and molecular biorecognition, this Special Issue aims to provide an update to trends in nanobiomedicine and development of novel biologically inspired devices for safe and effective diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of disease.  

This Special Issue is cooperating with the NanoBio&Med 2017 conference (http://www.nanobiomedconf.com/NBM17/index.php). All speakers and registered participants at this conference are invited to submit a manuscript for publication.

Prof. Dr. Josep Samitier
Dr. Antonio Correia
Prof. Dipl.-Ing. Dr. techn. Dietmar Pum
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomimetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bio-nanofabrication
  • bio-nano measurement and microscopy
  • nanomaterials for bio and medical application
  • nanobioelectronics
  • integrated systems/nanobiosensors
  • nanotoxicology

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Reprogramming Cells for Synergistic Combination Therapy with Nanotherapeutics against Uveal Melanoma
Biomimetics 2018, 3(4), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics3040028 - 25 Sep 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common primary intraocular malignant tumor in adults and around half of the patients develop metastasis and die shortly after because of the lack of effective therapies for metastatic UM. Consequently, new therapeutic approaches to this disease are [...] Read more.
Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common primary intraocular malignant tumor in adults and around half of the patients develop metastasis and die shortly after because of the lack of effective therapies for metastatic UM. Consequently, new therapeutic approaches to this disease are welcome. In this regard, microRNAs have been shown to have a key role in neoplasia progression and have the potential to be used as therapeutic tools. In addition, in different cancers including UM, a particular microRNA signature appears that is different from healthy cells. Thus, restoring the regular levels of microRNAs could restore the normal behavior of cells. In this study, four microRNAs downregulated in UM have been chosen to reprogram cancer cells, to promote cell death or increase their sensitivity to the chemotherapeutic SN38. Furthermore, to improve the internalization, stability and/or solubility of the therapeutic molecules employed in this approach, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used as carriers. Remarkably, this study found a synergistic effect when the four oligonucleotides were employed and when the chemotherapeutic drug was added. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from NanoBio&Med 2017)
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Open AccessArticle
Oil-In-Water Microemulsions as Hosts for Benzothiophene-Based Cytotoxic Compounds: An Effective Combination
Biomimetics 2018, 3(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics3020013 - 16 Jun 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics in order to overcome side effects and enhance chemosensitivity remains a major issue in cancer research. In this context, biocompatible oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsions were developed as matrices for the encapsulation of DPS-2 a benzothiophene analogue, exhibiting high cytotoxicity in [...] Read more.
Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics in order to overcome side effects and enhance chemosensitivity remains a major issue in cancer research. In this context, biocompatible oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsions were developed as matrices for the encapsulation of DPS-2 a benzothiophene analogue, exhibiting high cytotoxicity in various cancer cell lines, among them the MW 164 skin melanoma and Caco-2 human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. The microemulsion delivery system was structurally characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The effective release of a lipophilic encapsulated compound was evaluated via confocal microscopy. The cytotoxic effect, in the presence and absence of DPS-2, was examined through the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay. When encapsulated, DPS-2 was as cytotoxic as when dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Hence, the oil cores of O/W microemulsions were proven effective biocompatible carriers of lipophilic bioactive molecules in biological assessment experiments. Further investigation through fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, comet assay, and Western blotting, revealed that DPS-2, although non-genotoxic, induced S phase delay accompanied by cdc25A degradation and a nonapoptotic cell death in both cell lines, which implies that this benzothiophene analogue is a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication inhibitor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from NanoBio&Med 2017)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Alterations in Cellular Processes Involving Vesicular Trafficking and Implications in Drug Delivery
Biomimetics 2018, 3(3), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics3030019 - 24 Jul 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Endocytosis and vesicular trafficking are cellular processes that regulate numerous functions required to sustain life. From a translational perspective, they offer avenues to improve the access of therapeutic drugs across cellular barriers that separate body compartments and into diseased cells. However, the fact [...] Read more.
Endocytosis and vesicular trafficking are cellular processes that regulate numerous functions required to sustain life. From a translational perspective, they offer avenues to improve the access of therapeutic drugs across cellular barriers that separate body compartments and into diseased cells. However, the fact that many factors have the potential to alter these routes, impacting our ability to effectively exploit them, is often overlooked. Altered vesicular transport may arise from the molecular defects underlying the pathological syndrome which we aim to treat, the activity of the drugs being used, or side effects derived from the drug carriers employed. In addition, most cellular models currently available do not properly reflect key physiological parameters of the biological environment in the body, hindering translational progress. This article offers a critical overview of these topics, discussing current achievements, limitations and future perspectives on the use of vesicular transport for drug delivery applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from NanoBio&Med 2017)
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Other

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Open AccessPerspective
Biosafety of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles
Biomimetics 2018, 3(3), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics3030022 - 15 Aug 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Careful analysis of any new nanomedicine device or disposal should be undertaken to comprehensively characterize the new product before application, so that any unintended side effect is minimized. Because of the increasing number of nanotechnology-based drugs, we can anticipate that regulatory authorities might [...] Read more.
Careful analysis of any new nanomedicine device or disposal should be undertaken to comprehensively characterize the new product before application, so that any unintended side effect is minimized. Because of the increasing number of nanotechnology-based drugs, we can anticipate that regulatory authorities might adapt the approval process for nanomedicine products due to safety concerns, e.g., request a more rigorous testing of the potential toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs). Currently, the use of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) as drug delivery systems is challenged by a lack of data on the toxicological profile of coated or non-coated MSN. In this context, we have carried out an extensive study documenting the influence of different functionalized MSN on the cellular internalization and in vivo behaviour. In this article, a synthesis of these works is reviewed and the perspectives are drawn. The use of magnetic MSN (Fe3O4@MSN) allows an efficient separation of coated NPs from cell cultures with a simple magnet, leading to results regarding corona formation without experimental bias. Our interest is focused on the mechanism of interaction with model membranes, the adsorption of proteins in biological fluids, the quantification of uptake, and the effect of such NPs on the transcriptomic profile of hepatic cells that are known to be readily concerned by NPs’ uptake in vivo, especially in the case of an intravenous injection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from NanoBio&Med 2017)
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