Special Issue "Biomimicry and Sustainable Urban Design"

A special issue of Biomimetics (ISSN 2313-7673).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Maibritt Pedersen Zari
Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington, Kelburn, Wellington 6012, New Zealand
Interests: regenerative urban design; biomimicry; biophilia; climate change adaptation; nature-based solutions and ecosystem services
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Humanity faces an unprecedented convergence of ecological and climatic changes that are and will profoundly affect civilisation. At the same time, the growing human population is now mostly urbanised, and urbanisation rates are increasing, particularly in developing nations. Although cities occupy only approximately 3% of the global land area, it is well known that they are large consumers of ecosystem services. Cities are typically sites of tremendous concentrations of energy use, water use, materials, greenhouse gas emissions, and other pollutants. It is clear that the way we build and live in our cities must change rapidly.

How can we create and remediate cities so they become complex self-regulating systems that produce and regenerate ecological and societal health? How can our cities and buildings be designed to evolve over time to become more, rather than less fit for place and purpose? How can cities become responsive ‘living’ entities that can become resilient even as context changes? This Special Issue investigates the potential of biomimicry, of emulating the processes and functions of the living world, from individual organisms through to whole living biomes, as a way to consider some of these questions.

This Special Issue aims to investigate how biomimicry can be applied at urban scales in the design of sustainable, resilient cities through the translation and practical application of biological and ecological knowledge, along with an understanding of human–nature relationships. We invite urban designers, planners, landscape architects, architects, and scientists to reimagine the most common human habitat, i.e., the city, by submitting stimulating, speculative, and forward-thinking original research, case studies, and articles that begin to forge a new way to understand, construct, and live in urban contexts.

Dr. Maibritt Zari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomimetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ecomimicry
  • Bioinspired design
  • Urban design
  • Urban ecology
  • Ecosystem services
  • Landscape architecture
  • Ecological design
  • Living buildings
  • Sustainable urban infrastructure
  • Green infrastructure
  • Nature-based solutions
  • Urban metabolism
  • Industrial ecology
  • Biophilic design

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Biomimicry for Regenerative Built Environments: Mapping Design Strategies for Producing Ecosystem Services
Biomimetics 2020, 5(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics5020018 - 12 May 2020
Abstract
Built environment professionals must solve urgent and complex problems related to mitigating and adapting to climate change and biodiversity loss. Cities require redesign and retrofit so they can become complex systems that create rather than diminish ecological and societal health. One way to [...] Read more.
Built environment professionals must solve urgent and complex problems related to mitigating and adapting to climate change and biodiversity loss. Cities require redesign and retrofit so they can become complex systems that create rather than diminish ecological and societal health. One way to do this is to strategically design buildings and cities to generate and provide ecosystem services. This is an aspect of biomimicry, where whole ecosystems and their functions are emulated, in order to positively shift the ecological performance of buildings and urban settings. A small number of methodologies and frameworks for ecosystem services design have been proposed, but their use is not wide spread. A key barrier is the lack of translational work between ecology concepts and practical examples of ecosystem services design for a built environment context. In response, this paper presents research underpinning the creation of a qualitative relational diagram in an online interactive format that relates ecosystem services concepts to design strategies, concepts, technologies, and case studies in a format for use by built environment professionals. The paper concludes that buildings and whole cities should be expected to become active contributors to socio-ecological systems because, as the diagram shows, many strategies and technologies to enable this already exist. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimicry and Sustainable Urban Design)
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Open AccessArticle
Findings of Case-Study Analysis: System-Level Biomimicry in Built-Environment Design
Biomimetics 2019, 4(4), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics4040073 - 01 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Complex systems challenges like those facing 21st-century humanity, require system-level solutions that avoid siloed or unnecessarily narrow responses. System-level biomimicry aims to identify and adopt design approaches that have been developed and refined within ecosystems over 3.8 billion years of evolution. While not [...] Read more.
Complex systems challenges like those facing 21st-century humanity, require system-level solutions that avoid siloed or unnecessarily narrow responses. System-level biomimicry aims to identify and adopt design approaches that have been developed and refined within ecosystems over 3.8 billion years of evolution. While not new, system-level biomimetic solutions have been less widely applied in urban design than the ‘form’ and ‘process’ level counterparts. This paper explores insights from a selection of system-level case studies in the built environment, using meta-analysis to investigate common challenges and priorities from these projects to support knowledge-sharing and continued development in the field. Using a grounded research approach, common themes are distilled, and findings presented regarding success and barriers to implementation and scaling. Considering the findings, and drawing on complex adaptive systems theory, the paper posits opportunities to facilitate broader implementation and mainstreaming of system-level biomimetic design approaches in the built environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimicry and Sustainable Urban Design)
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