Special Issue "Epigenetic Regulation of the Immune System"

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Marie Černá

Guest Editor
Charles University, Prague Praha, Czech Republic

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

The term epigenetics was first introduced by Conrad Waddington in 1942. For long half century, it was not quite clear its significance in gene expression, cell differentiation and heritability. Until modern technologies of the beginning of the 21st century have opened a new area of research. Epigenetic modifications of the genome allow reaction of cells to external signals by alternation of gene activity, by modifying gene expression. Epigenome, in fact, controls accessibility of DNA for transcription factors that regulate level of gene expression. By this way epigenetic regulations are responsible for the cell differentiation that is so critical in the immune system.

Innate and adaptive immune responses are components of an integrated system of host defense in which numerous cells and molecules function cooperatively. Immune responses are regulated by a system of positive feedback loops that amplify the reaction and by control mechanisms that prevent inappropriate or pathologic reactions. All regulations are under control of epigenetic mechanisms.

Immunity declines during ageing, as shown by the increased susceptibility to infection. Deterioration of immune reactions mirrors alteration of cell function, particularly T lymphocytes. With aging there is progressive accumulation of epigenetic damage as a direct consequence of evolved limitations in the genetic and epigenetic settings of maintenance and repair functions.

We encourage to submit research and review papers about the epigenetic modulation in various immune responses. We believe that this Special Issue will reflect the new exciting era of epigenetics and show its role in the immune function.

Dr. Marie Černá
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • immune responses
  • innate immunity
  • adaptive immunity
  • cell differentiation
  • cellular senescence
  • gene expression
  • DNA methylation
  • histone modifications
  • RNA-mediated gene silencing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Abnormal Hypermethylation of CpG Dinucleotides in Promoter Regions of Matrix Metalloproteinases Genes in Breast Cancer and its Relation to Epigenomic Subtypes and HER2 Overexpression
Biomedicines 2020, 8(5), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines8050116 - 10 May 2020
Abstract
Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) substantially contribute to the regulation of intercellular interactions and thereby play a role in maintaining the tissue structure and function. We examined methylation of a subset of 5’-cytosine-phosphate-guanine-3’ (CpG) dinucleotides in promoter regions of the [...] Read more.
Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) substantially contribute to the regulation of intercellular interactions and thereby play a role in maintaining the tissue structure and function. We examined methylation of a subset of 5’-cytosine-phosphate-guanine-3’ (CpG) dinucleotides in promoter regions of the MMP2, MMP11, MMP14, MMP15, MMP16, MMP17, MMP21, MMP23B, MMP24, MMP25, MMP28, TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, and TIMP4 genes by methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme digestion PCR. In our collection of 183 breast cancer samples, abnormal hypermethylation was observed for CpGs in MMP2, MMP23B, MMP24, MMP25, and MMP28 promoter regions. The non-methylated status of the examined CpGs in promoter regions of MMP2, MMP23B, MMP24, MMP25, and MMP28 in tumors was associated with low HER2 expression, while the group of samples with abnormal hypermethylation of at least two of these MMP genes was significantly enriched with HER2-positive tumors. Abnormal methylation of MMP24 and MMP25 was significantly associated with a CpG island hypermethylated breast cancer subtype discovered by genome-wide DNA bisulfite sequencing. Our results indicate that abnormal hypermethylation of at least several MMP genes promoters is a secondary event not directly functional in breast cancer (BC) pathogenesis. We suggest that it is elevated and/or ectopic expression, rather than methylation-driven silencing, that might link MMPs to tumorigenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetic Regulation of the Immune System)
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