10th Anniversary of Biomedicines—Aging Changes in Cells, Tissues and Organs

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Biology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 17715

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Medical and Health Sciences, School of Health and Human Development, University of Évora, 7000-671 Évora, Portugal
2. Mediterranean Institute for Agriculture, Environment and Development (MED), University of Évora, 7000-671 Évora, Portugal
Interests: biology of oral tissues; eating behavior and its effects on the health of people and populations; food, health and society and the “One Health” approach
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E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, ICT—Institute of Earth Sciences, School of Sciences and Technology & IIFA, University of Évora, 7000-671 Évora, Portugal
Interests: cell culture; signaling pathways; cell signaling; phosphorylation; signal transduction; allergens; aerobiology; bioaerosols; metabolism; enrironmental health; molecular allergology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The year 2023 marks the 10th anniversary of Biomedicines, a peer-reviewed open access journal in the biomedical field. So far, Biomedicines has published more than 2700 papers from more than 17,000 authors. We appreciate each author, reviewer, and academic editor whose support has brought us to where we are today.

To celebrate this significant milestone, we aim to publish a Special Issue entitled 10th Anniversary of Biomedicines—Aging Changes in Cells, Tissues and Organs. Cells are the basic structural and functional units of tissues, and they all experience changes with aging—they get larger, with less ability to divide and multiply, and many of them lose their ability to function or start to function abnormally. Some tissues face problems in obtaining oxygen and nutrients, as well as difficulties in the removal of carbon dioxide and other waste products. Some tissues lose mass, while others become rigid. In this sense, all vital organs suffer some degree of function loss with aging. Although aging occurs in all cells, tissues, and organs, affecting the functioning of every system in the body, most people do not notice this loss immediately because organs have a reserve capacity to function beyond their normal needs. However, when an organ is subjected to an effort that is greater than usual, it may fail to properly function properly. There are several factors that require an extraphysiological response in order to maintain homeostasis, namely, diseases, particular physiological states, significant changes in lifestyle, medications and their side effects, extreme temperature changes in the environment, etc.

This Special Issue aims to gather high-quality research concerning the structural and functional changes in organs, tissues, and cells during aging. New and comparative methodologies to understand the biology of these changes and review articles are welcomed. Potential topics include the following: tissue homeostasis and aging; proliferative homeostasis and aging; ageing and apoptosis; ageing-related tissue-specific alterations; oxidative stress, aging, and diseases; phenotypes and mechanisms of stem-cell aging; the interaction of lifelong influences; biological theories of aging; types of cell changes (atrophy, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, dysplasia, neoplasia); senescent cells in aging; and detection techniques of cellular senescence and cellular ageing.

Dr. Fernando Capela e Silva
Dr. Célia M. Antunes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aging changes
  • cells
  • tissues
  • organs
  • tissues homeostasis
  • diseases
  • senescence

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 3236 KiB  
Article
Identification of Potential Drug Targets for Antiplatelet Therapy Specifically Targeting Platelets of Old Individuals through Proteomic Analysis
by Seung Hee Lee, Suyeon Cho, Jong Youl Lee, Jung Yeon Hong, Suji Kim, Myong-Ho Jeong and Won-Ho Kim
Biomedicines 2023, 11(11), 2944; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11112944 - 31 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Aging is a growing problem worldwide, and the prevalence and mortality of arterial and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are higher in the elderly than in the young population. To address this issue, various anticoagulants have been used. However, no evidence can confirm that antithrombotic [...] Read more.
Aging is a growing problem worldwide, and the prevalence and mortality of arterial and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are higher in the elderly than in the young population. To address this issue, various anticoagulants have been used. However, no evidence can confirm that antithrombotic agents are suitable for the elderly. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the platelet proteome of aged mice and identify antithrombotic drug targets specific to the elderly. Based on the proteome analysis of platelets from aged mice, 308 increased or decreased proteins were identified. Among these proteins, three targets were selected as potential antithrombotic drug targets. These targets are membrane proteins or related to platelet function and include beta-2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GP1, ApolipoproteinH (ApoH)), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein2 (AGP2, Orosomucoid-2 (Orm2)), and Ras-related protein (Rab11a). Full article
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12 pages, 3411 KiB  
Article
A High-Fat and High-Carbohydrate Diet Promotes Reminiscent Hallmarks of an Aging Ovary in the Rabbit Model
by Verónica Díaz-Hernández, Luis M. Montaño, Ivette Caldelas and Alejandro Marmolejo-Valencia
Biomedicines 2022, 10(12), 3068; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10123068 - 29 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2127
Abstract
The primary definition of ovarian aging refers to the loss of follicles. Moreover, the aging of the microenvironment in ovaries, specifically affecting the follicles, may reveal deterioration with advancing age. Besides aging, metabolic disorders associated with hypercaloric diets may affect ovarian health and [...] Read more.
The primary definition of ovarian aging refers to the loss of follicles. Moreover, the aging of the microenvironment in ovaries, specifically affecting the follicles, may reveal deterioration with advancing age. Besides aging, metabolic disorders associated with hypercaloric diets may affect ovarian health and manifest characteristics associated with premature aging. In this study, we used 10-week-old chinchilla rabbits fed with a high-fat and high-carbohydrate diet (HFCD) until 25 weeks of age to explore hallmarks of reminiscent ovarian aging. The HFCD diet appeared to affect the ovarian reserve, reflected in a significant decrease in primordial follicles. Likewise, Sudan black stain detection revealed substantial differences in the deposits of lipofuscin in the interstitial glands of HFCD-fed rabbits compared to controls, constituting a “hallmark” of aging. The HFCD showed no induced changes in the expression of SOD 2 in the interstitial gland; however, surface epithelium cells were greater expressed. Besides this, the HFCD induced nuclear translocation of NF-ΚΒ p65 factor transcription in surface epithelium cells. We conclude that an HFCD induces a greater accumulation of senescence cells in the interstitial gland, promoting characteristics reminiscent of ovarian aging. However, the activation mechanism of NF-KB caused by an HFCD, which may be stress-responsive and generated by the interstitial gland, requires further study. Full article
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14 pages, 4069 KiB  
Article
Skin, Liver, and Kidney Interactions Contribute to Skin Dryness in Aging KK-Ay/Tajcl Mice
by Keiichi Hiramoto, Kenji Goto, Shota Tanaka, Tsuneki Horikawa and Kazuya Ooi
Biomedicines 2022, 10(10), 2648; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10102648 - 20 Oct 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1714
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle-related disease that affects people worldwide and is especially prevalent in the elderly. Many elderly people with diabetes also complain of dry skin; however, the relationship between aging and dry skin in type 2 diabetes is unknown. The [...] Read more.
Type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle-related disease that affects people worldwide and is especially prevalent in the elderly. Many elderly people with diabetes also complain of dry skin; however, the relationship between aging and dry skin in type 2 diabetes is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the interaction between aging and dry skin using the specific pathogen-free KK-Ay/TaJcl type 2 diabetes mouse model. Skin dryness in this model increases with age and was evaluated at 10, 27, 40, and 50 weeks. We observed increased mast cell expression, increased histamine and matrix metalloproteinase-1 levels, and decreased collagen expression in the skin of aging KK-Ay/TaJcl mice. In addition, the increased expression of angiopoietin 2, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and endostatin in the blood indicated kidney damage in this model. Aging KK-Ay/TaJcl mice also showed fatty liver pathology, which led to increased reactive oxygen species in the blood and liver, as well as the increased expression of M1 macrophages in the liver. These results showed that dry skin is associated with skin, kidney, and liver interactions in an aging type 2 diabetes mouse model. Full article
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Review

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14 pages, 1099 KiB  
Review
Current Understanding of the Role of Senescent Melanocytes in Skin Ageing
by Bethany K. Hughes and Cleo L. Bishop
Biomedicines 2022, 10(12), 3111; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10123111 - 2 Dec 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 6888
Abstract
Melanocytes reside within the basal epidermis of human skin, and function to protect the skin from ultraviolet light through the production of melanin. Prolonged exposure of the skin to UV light can induce irreparable DNA damage and drive cells into senescence, a sustained [...] Read more.
Melanocytes reside within the basal epidermis of human skin, and function to protect the skin from ultraviolet light through the production of melanin. Prolonged exposure of the skin to UV light can induce irreparable DNA damage and drive cells into senescence, a sustained cell cycle arrest that prevents the propagation of this damage. Senescent cells can also be detrimental and contribute to skin ageing phenotypes through their senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Senescent cells can act in both an autocrine and paracrine manner to produce widespread tissue inflammation and skin ageing. Recently, melanocytes have been identified as the main senescent cell population within the epidermis and have been linked to a variety of skin ageing phenotypes, such as epidermal thinning and the presence of wrinkles. However, the literature surrounding melanocyte senescence is limited and tends to focus on the role of senescence in the prevention of melanoma. Therefore, this review aims to explore the current understanding of the contribution of senescent melanocytes to human skin ageing. Full article
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25 pages, 942 KiB  
Review
Frailty in Aging and the Search for the Optimal Biomarker: A Review
by Magdalena Sepúlveda, Diego Arauna, Francisco García, Cecilia Albala, Iván Palomo and Eduardo Fuentes
Biomedicines 2022, 10(6), 1426; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10061426 - 16 Jun 2022
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4654
Abstract
In the context of accelerated aging of the population worldwide, frailty has emerged as one of the main risk factors that can lead to loss of self-sufficiency in older people. This syndrome is defined as a reduced state of physiological reserve and functional [...] Read more.
In the context of accelerated aging of the population worldwide, frailty has emerged as one of the main risk factors that can lead to loss of self-sufficiency in older people. This syndrome is defined as a reduced state of physiological reserve and functional capacity. The main diagnostic tools for frailty are based on scales that show deficits compared to their clinical application, such as the Fried frailty phenotype, among others. In this context, it is important to have one or more biomarkers with clinical applicability that can objectively and precisely determine the degree or risk of frailty in older people. The objective of this review was to analyze the biomarkers associated with frailty, classified according to the pathophysiological components of this syndrome (inflammation, coagulation, antioxidants, and liver function, among others). The evidence demonstrates that biomarkers associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, skeletal/cardiac muscle function, and platelet function represent the most promising markers of frailty due to their pathophysiological association with this syndrome. To a lesser extent but with the possibility of greater innovation, biomarkers associated with growth factors, vitamins, amino acids, and miRNAs represent alternatives as markers of this geriatric syndrome. Likewise, the incorporation of artificial intelligence represents an interesting approach to strengthening the diagnosis of frailty by biomarkers. Full article
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