Special Issue "Dairy Beverages: New Trends and Concepts"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Marta Henriques

Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Portugal
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Health, nutrition, new taste options and convenience are hot industry trends right now. Dairy drinks are ideal for adding value in terms of nutrition, wellness and functional additives. It the potential for innovation in dairy beverages category is real, with new product development offering opportunities for meal substitution and on-the-go consumption. The challenge is to stablish the systems that can meet the demand for healthy dairy drinks, while delivering the high quality, safety, stability during storage and transportation, texture and mouthfeel that consumers expect. This Special Issue comprises a wide range of articles serving to highlight new existing work conducted in the field of dairy beverages.

Dr. Marta Henriques
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Ricotta Cheese Whey-Fruit-Based Beverages: Pasteurization Effects on Antioxidant Composition and Color
Received: 18 October 2016 / Revised: 9 February 2017 / Accepted: 13 February 2017 / Published: 20 February 2017
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Abstract
In order to minimize the precipitate formation upon pasteurization for whey-fruit juice-based beverages, a novel type of functional beverage was prepared, in which whey was replaced with Ricotta-cheese whey (RCW). Aiming at evaluating the influence of fruit juice type (yellow: apple, pear; red:
[...] Read more.
In order to minimize the precipitate formation upon pasteurization for whey-fruit juice-based beverages, a novel type of functional beverage was prepared, in which whey was replaced with Ricotta-cheese whey (RCW). Aiming at evaluating the influence of fruit juice type (yellow: apple, pear; red: blueberry, strawberry) and pasteurization conditions on color and antioxidants, four fruit-RCW-based beverages (juice/RCW ratio: 80/20, 14% soluble solids content) were prepared and divided into two lots, and each lot was pasteurized according to different times/temperatures. After pasteurization, no formation of precipitate was observed in the bottles, even if some turbidity, ranging from 25 NTU (pear-RCW) to 190 NTU (blueberry-RCW), was observed. The blending of juices with RCW caused color darkening in apple, pear, and strawberry blends, and brightening in the blueberry one. The pasteurization conditions had a greater impact on the color changes of ‘yellow’ beverages than those of the ‘red’ ones. With a lethal rate F 100 10 = 14 , there was a greater decrease in the total phenolic content (TPC) in blueberry-, strawberry-, and apple-RCW beverages, and a greater decrease in the monomeric anthocyanin pigment (MAP) and a smaller increase in the percent of polymeric color, in the blueberry-RCW beverage. Results on the antioxidant activity suggested that the Maillard reaction products formed in response to thermal treatment and/or the formation of anthocyanin polymers, likely compensate for the loss of antioxidant activity due to TPC and MAP degradations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Beverages: New Trends and Concepts)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Nanoencapsulation of Polyphenols towards Dairy Beverage Incorporation
Received: 11 June 2018 / Revised: 2 August 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 16 August 2018
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Abstract
Phenolic compounds, while widely recognized for their biological potential, when added into food matrixes may interact with food constituents. One example of this is the interaction between phenolic compounds and proteins, that may result in the formation of complexes and alter the bioavailability
[...] Read more.
Phenolic compounds, while widely recognized for their biological potential, when added into food matrixes may interact with food constituents. One example of this is the interaction between phenolic compounds and proteins, that may result in the formation of complexes and alter the bioavailability of both phenolic compounds and the nutrient availability. Moreover, when adding compounds to improve the functionality of a food matrix, these interactions may compromise the perceived benefits of the additions. Nanoencapsulation has been considered one of the means to circumvent these interactions, as they may function as a physical barrier between the phenolic compounds and the matrix (preventing not only the loss of bioactivity, but eventual sensorial alterations of the foods), protect phenolic compounds through the gastrointestinal tract, and may enhance phenolic absorption through cellular endocytosis. However, despite these advantages the food industry is still limited in its nanotechnological solutions, as special care must be taken to use food-grade encapsulants which will not pose any deleterious effect towards human health. Therefore, this review aims to provide an encompassing view of the existing advantages and limitations of nanotechnology, associated with the inclusion of phenolic compounds in dairy beverages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Beverages: New Trends and Concepts)
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