Special Issue "Sex Desire, Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunction"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Isabel María Fernández Medina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Medicine, University of Almería,04120 Almería, Spain
Interests: health sciences, health care, caring science, qualitative research, clinical nursing
Dr. María Dolores Ruiz Fernández
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Medicine, University of Almería, Almería, Spain
Interests: neurodegenerative diseases; geriatric psychiatry; palliative care; family caregiving; bioethics; community health
Dr. María del Mar Jiménez Lasserrotte
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Medicine, University of Almería, Almería, Spain
Interests: clinical nursing care; end of life care; public health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite papers to this Special Issue of the Behavioral Sciences that will focus on sex desire, sexuality and sexual dysfunction. Sexuality, an indispensable aspect of human life, is a multidimensional construct closely linked to individual identity, integrity, body image and bonding. Our sexual lives are influenced by physiological, psychological, social, cultural and religious factors. These determinants give each person’s sexuality a marked personal and specific character which is experienced and expressed through desires, attitudes and sexual practices that are beyond procreation.

The association between sexuality and general health has been demonstrated. Healthy lifestyles promote sexual expressions and a fulfilling intimite life can be a facilitator of physiological and psychological well-being. Nevertheless, physiologic changes that occur during the life and illness might negatively affect sex desire and individual’s capability for sex.

Healthcare professionals are in a unique position to provide information and counseling in order to promote and improve patients’ sexual lives and health, although many of them have difficulties in discussing sexuality with their patients.

For this Special Issue, we welcome original research, reviews and commentaries that provide new knowledge about determinants of sexual desire, relationship between sexual satisfaction and quality of life, sexual experiences in patients with chronic illness or disabled people, healthcare professionals experiences, sexual dysfunction as well as other issues related with sexuality.

Dr. Isabel María Fernández Medina
Dr. María Dolores Ruiz Fernández
Dr. María del Mar Jiménez Lasserrotte
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sex desire
  • sexuality
  • sexual dysfunction
  • health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Mass Media Exposure and Safer Sex Negotiation among Women in Sexual Unions in Sub-Saharan Africa: Analysis of Demographic and Health Survey Data
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(5), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11050063 - 28 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 895
Abstract
(1) Background: Improving sexual autonomy among women in sexual unions comes with various benefits, including the reduction of sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. We examined the relationship between mass media exposure and safer sex negotiation among women in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). (2) Methods: [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Improving sexual autonomy among women in sexual unions comes with various benefits, including the reduction of sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. We examined the relationship between mass media exposure and safer sex negotiation among women in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). (2) Methods: The study involved a cross-sectional analysis of Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data of 29 sub-Saharan African countries. A total of 224,647 women aged 15–49 were included in our analyses. We examined the association between mass media exposure and safer sex negotiation using binary logistic regression analysis. The results are presented using a crude odds ratio (cOR) and adjusted odds ratio (aOR), with their respective confidence intervals (CIs). Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. (3) Results: The overall prevalence of safer sex negotiation among women in sexual unions in SSA was 71.6% (71.4–71.8). Women exposed to mass media had higher odds of negotiating for safer sex compared with those who had no exposure (aOR = 1.94; 95% CI = 1.86–2.02), and this persisted after controlling for covariates (maternal age, wealth index, maternal educational level, partner’s age, partner’s educational level, sex of household head, religion, place of residence, and marital status) (aOR = 1.40; 95% CI = 1.35–1.46). The disaggregated results showed higher odds of safer sex negotiation among women exposed to mass media in all the individual countries, except Ghana, Comoros, Rwanda, and Namibia. (4) Conclusions: The findings could inform policies (e.g., transformative mass media educational seminars) and interventions (e.g., face-to-face counselling; small group sensitization sessions) in SSA on the crucial role of mass media in increasing safer sex practice among women in sexual unions. To accelerate progress towards the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goal five’s targets on empowering all women and safeguarding their reproductive rights, the study recommends that countries such as Ghana, Comoros, Rwanda, and Namibia need to intensify their efforts (e.g., regular sensitization campaigns) in increasing safer sex negotiation among women to counter power imbalances in sexual behaviour. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sex Desire, Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunction)
Article
Sexually Explicit Online Media Use and Sexual Behavior among Sexual Minority Men in Portugal
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(3), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11030038 - 18 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 858
Abstract
Introduction: This study aimed to describe sexually explicit online media (SEOM) use among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Portugal and to examine any associations between exposure to SEOM depicting unprotected anal intercourse and engaging in unprotected anal sex. Methods [...] Read more.
Introduction: This study aimed to describe sexually explicit online media (SEOM) use among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Portugal and to examine any associations between exposure to SEOM depicting unprotected anal intercourse and engaging in unprotected anal sex. Methods: This study recruited 1577 MSM living in Portugal with Internet access, who ranged in age from 18 to 74 years old (Mage = 35.69, SDage = 11.16). Participants were recruited via websites, e-mail and social media. 67.3% (n = 1061) of sample participants self-identified as gay, and 32.7% (n = 516) claimed to be bisexual. The survey included four categories of questions/measurements, encompassing demographic information, SEOM use, explicit imagery of protected/unprotected anal sex and sexual behavior. Results: The study results suggest that Portuguese MSM frequently use SEOM and that they possess a stated preference for SEOM displaying unprotected anal sex. Furthermore, this study’s findings indicate that self-identified gay men more frequently engage in unprotected sex than self-identified bisexual men. Finally, the study revealed that a preference for viewing SEOM displaying unprotected sex and higher levels of arousal attributed to direct SEOM exposure are significant predictors of having receptive anal sex without condoms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sex Desire, Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunction)
Article
Prevalence and Correlates of Sexual Risk Behavior among School-Going Adolescents in Four Caribbean Countries
Behav. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10110166 - 29 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1018
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of sexual risk behaviors among adolescents in the Caribbean. Nationally representative cross-sectional data were analyzed from 9143 adolescents (15 years = median age) that took part in the 2016 Dominican Republic, 2016 Suriname, 2017 [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of sexual risk behaviors among adolescents in the Caribbean. Nationally representative cross-sectional data were analyzed from 9143 adolescents (15 years = median age) that took part in the 2016 Dominican Republic, 2016 Suriname, 2017 Jamaica, and 2017 Trinidad and Tobago Global School-Based Student Health Survey (GSHS). The results indicate that 41.4% of the students had ever had sex, ranging from 26.4% in Trinidad and Tobago to 48.1% in Jamaica. Among the sexually active, 58.8% had had ≥2 sexual partners; 58.6% had had an early sexual debut (≤14 years); 41.9% had not used birth control the last time they had sex; 28.4% had not used a condom the last time they had sex; and, of the whole sample, 31.9% had engaged in two or more (multiple) sexual risk behaviors, ranging from 16.5% in Trinidad and Tobago to 40.3% in Jamaica. In an adjusted logistic regression analysis, substance use (tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis), psychological distress, frequent soft drink intake, participation in physical fighting, school truancy, older age, and male sex were associated with single and/or multiple sexual risk behaviors. A large number of adolescents in the Caribbean reported sexual risk behaviors, emphasizing the need for intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sex Desire, Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunction)
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