Special Issue "Behavioral and Psychological Intervention for Long Term Health Conditions"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2023 | Viewed by 2375

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Aikaterini Kassavou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Public Health and Primary Care, The University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0SR, UK
2. Warwick Businness School, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
Interests: behaviour sciences; tailored interventions; digital health; health care professionals; process for clinical effectiveness

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Health behaviors underpin long-term health conditions and direct their trajectory. However, only a minority of patients who receive treatment experience clinically meaningful and sustained health effects. Health care providers have an important role in supporting changes in patients’ health behavior; however, their time is limited and expensive. Current interventions are complex, including those delivered or received (a) at different levels, e.g., the patients, health care professionals, dyads, or groups; (b) via in-person communication or in combination with digital technology, e.g., smartphone apps, telemedicine; (c) across health care sectors, e.g., community, primary case, policy making.

Currently, there is limited evidence regarding the components and mechanisms of effective psychological and behavioral interventions, and their impact on long-term health conditions. 

This Special Issue aims to address this gap in the literature and advance the understanding of behavior change interventions for people with long-term health conditions. We are seeking articles that will enhance knowledge across the intersections of behavior change interventions, from the development, implementation, evaluation, and evidence to their translation in policy and practice. This Special Issue will provide a comprehensive library of research evidence that will advance our current understanding and knowledge of replicable ways to improve health behavior change interventions. It will also provide a description of the factors and the mechanisms of behavioral and psychological interventions that underpin and impact outcomes related to long-term health conditions.

Dr. Aikaterini Kassavou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • behavioural science
  • behaviour change interventions
  • components
  • mechanisms
  • health care providers
  • digital health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Public Health Safety in Community Living Circles Based on a Behavioral Motivation Perspective: Theoretical Framework and Evaluation System
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(1), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13010026 - 27 Dec 2022
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Abstract
Public health problems, such as the spread of COVID-19 and chronic diseases, are mainly caused by the daily life activities of community residents. Therefore, there is a need to build a healthy and safe community living circle through the evaluation of health behaviors [...] Read more.
Public health problems, such as the spread of COVID-19 and chronic diseases, are mainly caused by the daily life activities of community residents. Therefore, there is a need to build a healthy and safe community living circle through the evaluation of health behaviors in daily life. This paper proposes a theoretical framework and evaluation system for public health safety in community living circles, from a behavioral motivation perspective. Firstly, based on the behavioral motivation theory, a theoretical framework for the study of public health safety in community living circles is constructed from the perspective of the “project–activity–health” coupling relationship network, regarding community residents’ daily life activities. Then, a public health safety evaluation system for community living circles is proposed based on this framework, which includes the following: (1) identifying the scope of community living circles based on Spatio-temporal Activities Analysis; (2) Based on the theory of protection motivation, a health behavior evaluation model based on the three elements of “spatial and temporal geographical environment–daily life activities–public health safety” is established; (3) Based on the hierarchy of public health problems, a public health safety evaluation model of the community living circle is established. The behavioral motivation-based evaluation system explores a new approach and research paradigm for community-scale public health safety theory; this will help to achieve the goal of “healthy communities” when further empirical evidence is available. Full article
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Review

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Review
Digital Health Behavioural Interventions to Support Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour in Adults after Stroke: A Systematic Literature Review with Meta-Analysis of Controlled Trials
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(1), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13010062 - 10 Jan 2023
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Abstract
Background: As the global prevalence of stroke continues to rise, it becomes increasingly pressing to investigate digital health behaviour change interventions that promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour for stroke patients to support active lifestyles. Purpose: The primary aim of this study [...] Read more.
Background: As the global prevalence of stroke continues to rise, it becomes increasingly pressing to investigate digital health behaviour change interventions that promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour for stroke patients to support active lifestyles. Purpose: The primary aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of digital health interventions in promoting physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour for stroke patients. The secondary aim is to investigate the intervention components that explain intervention effectiveness to further inform intervention development and policy making. Methods: A systematic search of the literature was conducted in four databases (Scopus, MEDLINE (PubMed), Web of Science, and PsychINFO) to identify the most robust evidence in the form of randomised controlled trials of digital interventions for patients with stroke. A random-effects meta-analysis were utilized to quantify the intervention effects on behaviour change, and subgroup analyses to characterise intervention effective components. Results: In total, 16 RCTs were deemed eligible and included in the systematic review. Meta-analyses suggested significant improvements in physical activity (SMD = 0.39, 95% CI 0.17, 0.61, N = 326, p < 0.001, I2 = 0%), and reductions in time of sedentary behaviour (SMD= −0.45, 95% CI −0.76, -0.14, N = 167, p = 0.00, I2 = 0%) after stroke. The 10 m walk test for physical activity, and the timed up and go test for sedentary behaviour, were the objective outcome measures in the most effective behavioural change interventions. Subgroup analyses found that most effective interventions were underpinned by theories of self-regulation and utilised interactive functions to engage patients with the processes of behaviour change. Conclusions: Digital self-monitoring behavioural interventions are effective in promoting physical activity for stroke patients in adjunct to usual care clinical practice and rehabilitation programmes. Rigorous studies are required to provide evidence to disentangle the most effective intervention components for preventative practices and rehabilitation programs and to inform policymaking for stroke treatment. Full article
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