An Interdisciplinary Look at the Psychology and Neuroscience of Creativity

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2024) | Viewed by 2379

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA
Interests: addictive behaviors; biological psychology; creativity, human biology; stress; hispanic health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Creativity is essential for human survival. Our understanding of the various facets of creativity and the applications of creative thinking are expected to become increasingly important as we tackle new global challenges. In recent years, great strides have been made in knowledge about the predictors and outcomes of, as well as barriers to, creative behaviors in different contexts across the lifespan. While the majority have focused on positive creativity, it is important to note that creativity also has a dark side: malevolent creativity, in which creative efforts are used to harm rather than help others. This Special Issue is designed to showcase work on positive and negative creativity from a variety of behavioral disciplines. We welcome theoretical and empirical contributions addressing creativity in all forms, including creative expression, applications to therapy and wellness, educational and STEM training, workplace relations, facilitating innovations, and investigations of malevolent creativity.    

Prof. Dr. Natalie A. Ceballos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • creativity
  • creative expression
  • education
  • innovation
  • malevolent creativity
  • STEM
  • wellness
  • workplace

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 245 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Malevolent Creativity in Young Adulthood
by Natalie A. Ceballos and Toni Terling Watt
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 961; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13120961 - 22 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1722
Abstract
Background: Childhood trauma may increase the risk of antisocial behavior in young adulthood. Our study examined the relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and the specific antisocial behavior of malevolent creativity (MC), the application of original ideas to purposely harm others, often to [...] Read more.
Background: Childhood trauma may increase the risk of antisocial behavior in young adulthood. Our study examined the relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and the specific antisocial behavior of malevolent creativity (MC), the application of original ideas to purposely harm others, often to gain an unfair advantage through manipulation, threat, or harm. Methods: We surveyed college students (N = 524; 78% women) on demographics, ACEs, empathy, social support, coping, general creativity, and malevolent creativity. The data were analyzed via sequential linear regression models. Results: Reporting ≥ 4 ACEs was associated with increased MC, which remained significant when general creativity and demographics were controlled. The association between higher ACEs and MC was no longer significant when psychosocial control variables (social support, empathy, and coping) were included in the statistical model. Social support and empathy were negatively associated with MC, while coping and MC were positively associated. Conclusions: ACEs may increase the likelihood of malevolent creativity in young adulthood, but empathy and social support may disrupt this trajectory. Care should be taken that coping skills, while typically viewed as a positive addition to one’s behavioral repertoire, do not push individuals toward over-reliance on themselves, which may reduce prosocial behaviors and increase MC. Full article
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