Burnout and the Quality of Personal, Working and Social Life

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 13612

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Behavioral Sciences Department, Faculty of Medicine, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Iasi, 700115 Iasi, Romania
Interests: behavioral sciences; medical psychology; chronic diseases; child psychology
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Guest Editor
Dental Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine and Farmacy, University of Oradea, 410087 Oradea, Bihor, Romania
Interests: healthcare; burnout; medical education; community dentistry; healthcare policies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Burnout as a work-related phenomenon involving emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of reduced personal accomplishment. Many persons are at high risk of developing burnout syndrome, and scientific data have shown that individual factors are important, e.g., gender, marital status, parental tasks, chronic disease or psychological traits. Many jobs pose a higher risk of burnout, but most exposed are professionals working in the medical and educational fields. Social pressure and development have been found to be strongly related to burnout syndrome. Cultural factors are also important when it comes to prevention or intervention since there are countries where burnout is considered a disease, a healthcare problem that impacts society and for which medical and social support is offered, while others see burnout as an individual problem. The scientific literature presents the meaning of the concept balancing between a medical diagnosis and a social stigma. However, burnout syndrome is a common and widespread phenomenon.

This Special Issue is addressed to researchers and academics interested in presenting theoretical and practical research on the topic of burnout: causes, consequences, interventions. We invite articles, reviews, and meta-analyses on the topic of burnout from various areas: medicine, education, psychology, psychotherapy, counselling, human resources, ethics, social policy or wellbeing.

Dr. Magdalena Iorga
Dr. Raluca Iurcov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • burnout
  • healthcare
  • medical
  • education
  • psychotherapy
  • emotional intelligence
  • depression
  • professional errors
  • suicide
  • counseling

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 968 KiB  
Article
Examining Medical Staff Well-Being through the Application and Extension of the Job Demands–Resources Model: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Tiantian Jing, Xiaoyan Li, Chenhao Yu, Mayangzong Bai, Zhiruo Zhang and Sisi Li
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 979; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13120979 - 28 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1364
Abstract
For medical staff, job satisfaction is essential for advancement on an individual and organizational level. This study looked into the relationships between challenging job demands, job resources, personal resources, and well-being. Additionally, it examined the potential mediating effects of emotional exhaustion and work [...] Read more.
For medical staff, job satisfaction is essential for advancement on an individual and organizational level. This study looked into the relationships between challenging job demands, job resources, personal resources, and well-being. Additionally, it examined the potential mediating effects of emotional exhaustion and work motivation within the framework of the job demands–resources (JD–R) model. Results from a cross-sectional study of 267 medical employees at a second-grade comprehensive hospital in Jiangsu, China’s mainland, indicated that challenging job demands and job satisfaction were positively correlated and mediated via (decreasing) emotional exhaustion. The relationship between job resources and job satisfaction was found to be mediated via (decreasing) emotional exhaustion and (increasing) work motivation. The investigation also demonstrated that the two regulatory focuses serve different purposes. It was discovered that promotion focus had a favorable effect on work motivation but a negative effect on emotional exhaustion. Conversely, preventive focus only positively predicted emotional exhaustion. Thus, the JD–R model offers a valuable structure for clarifying the job satisfaction of health personnel. The implications for enhancing individual and job outcomes are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout and the Quality of Personal, Working and Social Life)
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13 pages, 1119 KiB  
Article
Self-Stigma and Mental Health in Divorced Single-Parent Women: Mediating Effect of Self-Esteem
by Anna Kim, Sesong Jeon and Jina Song
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(9), 744; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13090744 - 6 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2394
Abstract
Numerous studies have addressed the issue of “self-stigma” among divorced single-parent women. However, there is a scarcity of quantitative data available on this subject. Moreover, while self-esteem is a crucial factor throughout life, it has been extensively studied in the context of “children” [...] Read more.
Numerous studies have addressed the issue of “self-stigma” among divorced single-parent women. However, there is a scarcity of quantitative data available on this subject. Moreover, while self-esteem is a crucial factor throughout life, it has been extensively studied in the context of “children” from single-parent families, but not from the perspective of parents themselves. To address this gap, the present study aimed to explore the relationship between self-stigma, self-esteem, and mental health in 347 divorced, single-parent women. The online survey recruited participants randomly, with a specific focus on single mothers who were divorced and had more than one child under the age of 18. The analysis involved utilizing SPSS 25.0 (IBM Co., Armonk, NY, USA) and PROCESS Macro Version 4.1 (Model 4) to conduct descriptive statistics, frequency analysis, reliability assessment, correlation analysis, and mediating analysis. The findings revealed that self-esteem played a partial mediating role in the relationship between self-stigma and mental health. In other words, higher levels of self-stigma among divorced, single-parent women were associated with poorer mental health outcomes. Additionally, the study discovered that engaging in more self-stigma was linked to lower self-esteem and increased mental health distress. These results underscore the significance of internal factors, such as self-stigma and self-esteem, and highlight their relevance in formulating policies aimed at supporting divorced single-parent women. Policymakers should take these factors into account to develop effective strategies to aid this specific group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout and the Quality of Personal, Working and Social Life)
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11 pages, 581 KiB  
Article
The Influences of Sports Psychological Capital to University Baseball Athletes’ Life Stress and Athlete Burnout
by Meng-Hua Yang, Kai-Feng Hsueh, Chia-Ming Chang and Huey-Hong Hsieh
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(8), 617; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13080617 - 25 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1835
Abstract
Previous studies suggested that athletes’ psychological capital level is related to life stress and burnout. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the influences of university baseball athletes’ psychological capital on their life stress and burnout and provide practical suggestions for [...] Read more.
Previous studies suggested that athletes’ psychological capital level is related to life stress and burnout. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the influences of university baseball athletes’ psychological capital on their life stress and burnout and provide practical suggestions for athletes and coaches to reduce their life stress and burnout. In this study, we used athletes’ control variables (grade, year of training experience, and training days per week) and psychological capital (self-efficacy, hope, optimism, and resilience) to predict their life stress and burnout. A total of 428 division I baseball athletes from 16 teams of the national college baseball sports league in Taiwan participated in this survey, with a return rate of 89.2%. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to test the relationships among the above-mentioned variables. The results showed that the athletes demographics such as grade (β = 0.03, p > 0.05) and years of baseball training experience (β = 0.00, p > 0.05) had no significant influences on athlete burnout, while the days of baseball training per week (β = 0.32, p < 0.05) had a positive influence on athlete burnout. As for psychological capital, self-efficacy (β = −0.09, p < 0.05), hope (β = −0.27, p < 0.05), and optimism (β = −0.20, p < 0.05) had negative influences on life stress, while resilience (β = −0.07, p > 0.05) had no significant influences on life stress. Hope (β = −0.20, p < 0.05) had negative influences on athlete burnout, while self-efficacy (β = −0.00, p > 0.05), optimism (β = −0.06, p > 0.05), and resilience (β = −0.01, p > 0.05) had no significant influences on athlete burnout. Life stress (β = 0.52, p < 0.05) had significant influences on the burnout. Based on our research findings, suggestions were made to reduce the athletes’ life stress and athlete burnout. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout and the Quality of Personal, Working and Social Life)
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16 pages, 921 KiB  
Article
Antecedents of Compliance Intention and Its Impact on Waste Separation Behavior: Based on Rational Choice Theory and Deterrence Theory
by Sohee Kim
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 424; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13050424 - 17 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2304
Abstract
With the rapid growth of the urban population, the development of production and consumption, and improved living standards, waste generation has increased over time. The first positive step to solve the problem of household waste is waste separation behavior. Studying the determinants that [...] Read more.
With the rapid growth of the urban population, the development of production and consumption, and improved living standards, waste generation has increased over time. The first positive step to solve the problem of household waste is waste separation behavior. Studying the determinants that prompt individuals to comply with waste separation policy (WSP) is worthwhile. The author aims to offer an integrated view of individuals’ compliance with waste separation policy based on rational choice and deterrence theories. Survey data collected from 306 households in South Korea are used to test the research model using partial least squares analysis. The study shows that WSP compliance intention is motivated by the perceived benefit and perceived effectiveness of WSP. Furthermore, the results show that perceived deterrent severity and perceived deterrent certainty positively influence WSP compliance intention. The implications for theory and policymakers are discussed to facilitate waste separation behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout and the Quality of Personal, Working and Social Life)
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17 pages, 1170 KiB  
Article
Burnout, Organizational Justice, Workload, and Emotional Regulation among Medical and Non-Medical Personnel Working in Romanian Healthcare Units
by Roxana Mihaela Claponea and Magdalena Iorga
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(3), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13030225 - 4 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2305
Abstract
Background and objectives: The goal of this study was to evaluate the levels of organizational justice, emotional regulation, and workload associated with the level of burnout experienced in medical and non-medical staff from public and private medical units. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: The goal of this study was to evaluate the levels of organizational justice, emotional regulation, and workload associated with the level of burnout experienced in medical and non-medical staff from public and private medical units. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 230 healthcare professionals, including 139 medical personnel and 91 non-medical staff respondents. The collected socio-demographic and organizational data and psychological tools were the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI HSS), the ECO System, and the emotional regulation questionnaire (ERQ). Results: For medical staff, burnout was measured in terms of emotional exhaustion (M = 27.05 ± 12.34), depersonalization (M = 8.26 ± 3.95), and personal accomplishment (M = 47.35 ± 6.78). The scores for non-medical staff were emotional exhaustion (M = 35.84 ± 14.71), depersonalization (M = 11.79 ± 6.30), and personal accomplishment (M = 44 ± 7.37). In terms of workload, higher scores were observed for non-medical staff (M = 25.43 ± 7.87), while medical staff recorded lower values (M = 20.35 ± 7.65). The scores for the cognitive reappraisal dimension were as follows: medical personnel (M = 32.02 ± 5.37) and non-medical staff (M = 31.67 ± 6.19). In terms of the expressive suppression dimension, medical staff registered at M = 17.99 ± 5.61, and non-medical staff registered at M = 17.19 ± 5.53. For organizational justice, higher scores were registered for medical staff (M = 25.87 ± 6.02) and lower scores for non-medical staff (M = 21.34 ± 5.72). Conclusions: Medical staff felt a higher sense of organizational justice than non-medical staff, as is also evidenced by the level of the workload dimension, which registers higher values for non-medical personnel. In the case of burnout, higher levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization dimensions were also revealed for non-medical staff and, in the case of the professional fulfillment dimension, higher scores were registered for medical staff. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout and the Quality of Personal, Working and Social Life)
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15 pages, 1284 KiB  
Article
An Empirical Study Analyzing the Moderating Effect of Supervisor Support and Mediating Effect of Presenteeism among Eustress, Distress, and Innovative Behavior
by Amna Anjum, Yan Zhao and Naeem Faraz
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(3), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13030219 - 2 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2122
Abstract
Purpose: This article aims to illustrate that stress is not always a negative experience as it can have both positive and negative outcomes. The term “eustress” describes positive stress, while the term “distress” describes negative stress. To date, research on eustress is in [...] Read more.
Purpose: This article aims to illustrate that stress is not always a negative experience as it can have both positive and negative outcomes. The term “eustress” describes positive stress, while the term “distress” describes negative stress. To date, research on eustress is in the infancy stage. There are approximately 306 items that can be found in the Web of Science core collection for “eustress”, while there are 184,714 items found for “distress”. Few studies have examined the relationship between presenteeism, stress, and innovative behavior. Thus, the mechanism underlying this pathway still needs to be fully understood. Materials and Methods: A survey was conducted among 350 medical healthcare professionals from Pakistan. With the help of SPSS and AMOS, the data were analyzed and the combined effects of the variables were also investigated. Results: According to the current study, a mediation effect has been observed between innovative behavior and stress (eustress and distress). However, supervisor support moderates the relationship between stress and presenteeism and, likewise, between presenteeism and innovative behavior. Conclusion: Our analysis of variables establishes empirically robust relationships between the innovative behavior of medical healthcare professionals and the two different dimensions of stress. In addition, it describes a hypothetical alternative situation that explains how employees’ innovative work behavior is affected by eustress and distress in the presence of supervisor support. This study could have implications for improving medical healthcare professionals’ ability to incorporate innovative behavior into their practice in an effective manner in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout and the Quality of Personal, Working and Social Life)
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