Special Issue "Atmospheric Chemistry and New Particle Formation"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Aerosols".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jonas Elm
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry and iClimate, Aarhus University, Aarhus , Denmark
Interests: computational chemistry; new particle formation; aerosols; atmospheric chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Molecular level information about the fundamental processes of aerosol formation remains a challenging issue in climate research. This Special Issue focusses on elucidating the underlying processes from quantum chemical calculations, simulations, and experiments. We seek to cover a broad range of applications, from the reaction kinetics of individual emitted atmospheric vapors, towards understanding atmospheric cluster formation leading to new particle formation. Manuscripts related to the reaction kinetics of the compounds emitted from either the biosphere or anthropogenic sources are of interest. Studies that provide fundamental insight into inter- and intra-molecular interactions between atmospheric gas phase vapors are of general interest in order to improve the understanding of the hydrogen bond. The Special Issue also covers smog chamber and flow tube simulations and experiments that yield broad insight into secondary aerosol formation. We welcome all submissions that target molecular level aerosol processes related to atmospheric chemistry and new particle formation.

Dr. Jonas Elm
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Atmospheric reaction kinetics
  • Hydrogen bonding
  • Cluster formation
  • Nucleation and growth
  • Smog chamber and flow tube simulations and experiments

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Urban New Particle Formation in Amman—Jordan
Atmosphere 2020, 11(1), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11010079 - 09 Jan 2020
Abstract
We characterized new particle formation (NPF) events in the urban background of Amman during August 2016–July 2017. The monthly mean of submicron particle number concentration was 1.2 × 104–3.7 × 104 cm−3 (exhibited seasonal, weekly, and diurnal variation). Nucleation [...] Read more.
We characterized new particle formation (NPF) events in the urban background of Amman during August 2016–July 2017. The monthly mean of submicron particle number concentration was 1.2 × 104–3.7 × 104 cm−3 (exhibited seasonal, weekly, and diurnal variation). Nucleation mode (10–15 nm) concentration was 0.7 × 103–1.1 × 103 cm−3 during daytime with a sharp peak (1.1 × 103–1.8 × 103 cm−3) around noon. We identified 110 NPF events (≈34% of all days) of which 55 showed a decreasing mode diameter after growth. The NPF event occurrence was higher in summer than in winter, and events were accompanied with air mass back trajectories crossing over the Eastern Mediterranean. The mean nucleation rate (J10) was 1.9 ± 1.1 cm−3 s−1 (monthly mean 1.6–2.7 cm−3 s−1) and the mean growth rate was 6.8 ± 3.1 nm/h (4.1–8.8 nm/h). The formation rate did not have a seasonal pattern, but the growth rate had a seasonal variation (maximum around August and minimum in winter). The mean condensable vapor source rate was 4.1 ± 2.2 × 105 molecules/cm3 s (2.6–6.9 × 105 molecules/cm3 s) with a seasonal pattern (maximum around August). The mean condensation sink was 8.9 ± 3.3 × 10−3 s−1 (6.4–14.8 × 10−3 s−1) with a seasonal pattern (minimum around June and maximum in winter). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Chemistry and New Particle Formation)
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Open AccessArticle
Enhancing Potential of Trimethylamine Oxide on Atmospheric Particle Formation
Atmosphere 2020, 11(1), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11010035 - 27 Dec 2019
Abstract
The role of an oxidation product of trimethylamine, trimethylamine oxide, in atmospheric particle formation is studied using quantum chemical methods and cluster formation simulations. Molecular-level cluster formation mechanisms are resolved, and theoretical results on particle formation are confirmed with mass spectrometer measurements. Trimethylamine [...] Read more.
The role of an oxidation product of trimethylamine, trimethylamine oxide, in atmospheric particle formation is studied using quantum chemical methods and cluster formation simulations. Molecular-level cluster formation mechanisms are resolved, and theoretical results on particle formation are confirmed with mass spectrometer measurements. Trimethylamine oxide is capable of forming only one hydrogen bond with sulfuric acid, but unlike amines, trimethylamine oxide can form stable clusters via ion–dipole interactions. That is because of its zwitterionic structure, which causes a high dipole moment. Cluster growth occurs close to the acid:base ratio of 1:1, which is the same as for other monoprotic bases. Enhancement potential of trimethylamine oxide in particle formation is much higher than that of dimethylamine, but lower compared to guanidine. Therefore, at relatively low concentrations and high temperatures, guanidine and trimethylamine oxide may dominate particle formation events over amines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Chemistry and New Particle Formation)
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