Special Issue "Climate Change Impacts and Strategies for Mitigation and Adaptation in Agriculture"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Biometeorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Bruce A. McCarl
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Texas A&M University, Department of Agricultural Economics, College Station, TX, USA
Interests: policy analysis mainly in climate change; climate change mitigation; ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) analysis and Edwards Aquifer water as well as the proper application of quantitative methods to such analyses.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Witsanu Attavanich
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economics, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand
Interests: economic analysis and planning in climate change; climate change impacts on food system, food security; environmental valuation; public program and policy evaluation; climate change mitigation and adaptation
Dr. Chin-Hsien Yu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Development Studies, Southwestern University of Finance and Economics, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
Interests: climate change mitigation and adaptation; climate change impacts on agriculture; natural hazards and the impacts; policy analysis in energy and water; emergency management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agriculture is highly sensitive and vulnerable to climate change-induced shifts in means, variability and extremes. The climate is evolving and agriculturalists need to foresee future sensitivities and develop/promulgate adaptation strategies such as improving cultivar tolerance to high temperatures, using better-adapted animal breeds, changing crop timing, etc. Meanwhile, the IPCC shows that agriculture and land use accounts for nearly 30% of total emissions, contributing over 50% of the global anthropogenic non-CO2 GHGs [1]. Thus, in the long run, agriculture also needs to be a partner in a global mitigation effort, and the main mitigation strategies include GHG emissions reduction, sequestration to remove CO2 from the atmosphere, and the substitution of biological products for emission intensive products [1]. In planning, mitigation–adaptation synergy is also relevant. Hence, advancing the understanding of the potential impacts of climate change, as well as the implications of possible adaptation and mitigation strategies is important for science, policy and stakeholder communities.

This Special Issue thus aims to contribute to the state-of-art regarding the potential impacts of climate change on agriculture and corresponding adaptation and mitigation options. Vulnerable areas will be investigated together with the damaged values caused by climate change, plus discussion of the opportunities and challenges in facilitating agricultural climate change adaptation and mitigation.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • What are the potential impacts of climate change on agriculture?
  • What is the nature of possible adaption strategies and the implications of their implementation?
  • What is the nature of possible mitigation strategies and the implications of their implementation?

Dr. Bruce A. McCarl
Dr. Witsanu Attavanich
Dr. Chin-Hsien Yu
Guest Editors

Reference

Smith, P.; Bustamante, M.; Ahammad, H.; Clark, H.; Dong, H.; Elsiddig, E.A.; Haberl, H.; Harper, R.; House, J.; M. Jafari, M.; et al. Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU). In Climate Change 2014: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Edenhofer, O., Pichs-Madruga, R., Sokona, Y., Farahani, E., Kadner, S.; Seyboth, K., Adler, A., Baum, I., Brunner, S., Eickemeier, P., Kriemann, B., Savolainen, J., Schlömer, S., von Stechow, C., Zwickel T., Minx, J.C., Eds; Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, 2014.

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • impact
  • mitigation
  • adaptation
  • vulnerability

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Technological Progress, Demand, and Energy Policy on Agricultural and Bioenergy Markets
Atmosphere 2020, 11(1), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11010031 - 27 Dec 2019
Abstract
This study investigates the consequences of agricultural technological progress, biofuel policy, and agricultural demand growth on crop, livestock, and bioenergy markets, as well as resource usage and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, over data in the United States. We formed scenarios for future technological [...] Read more.
This study investigates the consequences of agricultural technological progress, biofuel policy, and agricultural demand growth on crop, livestock, and bioenergy markets, as well as resource usage and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, over data in the United States. We formed scenarios for future technological progress, demand growth, and biofuel policy and carried out a dynamic simulation. The major findings are: (1) Increasing technological progress reduces cropland for biofuel and cropland pasture for livestock but increases cropland for crop production; (2) Reducing corn ethanol requirements causes more cropland to move from cropping to pasture uses for livestock, however, lowering ethanol from corn residue has minor effects on cropland use; (3) Lowering the requirement of ethanol from corn lowers the price for most of the field crops and meat commodities, especially corn, hay, sorghum, and non-fed beef; (4) Technological progress and biofuel policy have significant effects of on GHG emissions. Increasing technical progress reduces overall GHG emissions. A lower corn ethanol level results in much larger GHG emissions as compared with the control case. This implies producing corn ethanol is effective in reducing emissions; and (5) Technological improvement is a key factor in meeting growing global demand for food and energy and reducing emissions. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Economic Valuation of Public Meteorological Information Services—A Case Study of Agricultural Producers in Taiwan
Atmosphere 2019, 10(12), 753; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10120753 - 28 Nov 2019
Abstract
Most meteorological information services in Taiwan are currently provided by the Central Weather Bureau, Ministry of Transportation and Communications. As agricultural production activities are sensitive to weather and climate conditions, meteorological information services are more important for agricultural decision-makers than those in other [...] Read more.
Most meteorological information services in Taiwan are currently provided by the Central Weather Bureau, Ministry of Transportation and Communications. As agricultural production activities are sensitive to weather and climate conditions, meteorological information services are more important for agricultural decision-makers than those in other sectors. This study uses the contingent valuation method to estimate the economic value of meteorological information services in Taiwan for agricultural producers. We assess the agricultural producers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for the meteorological information services, conducting a national face-to-face survey of 400 registered farmers in 20 municipalities in Taiwan in 2013. The results show the adjusted WTP for every agricultural household each year with a 95% confidence interval which ranges from 56.06 US dollars to 90.92 US dollars. The inferred annual economic value of meteorological information services for agricultural producers in Taiwan is between 28.06 million US dollars and 45.51 million US dollars. Moreover, the agricultural producers’ subjective assessment of weather forecast accuracy, farm size, and first bid price significantly affect the amount agricultural producers are willing to pay for meteorological information services. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Modeling Climate Change Impacts on Rice Growth and Yield under Global Warming of 1.5 and 2.0 °C in the Pearl River Delta, China
Atmosphere 2019, 10(10), 567; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10100567 - 21 Sep 2019
Abstract
In this study, the potential climate change impacts on rice growth and rice yield under 1.5 and 2.0 °C warming scenarios, respectively, are simulated using the Ceres-Rice Model based on high-quality, agricultural, experimental, meteorological and soil data, and the incorporation of future climate [...] Read more.
In this study, the potential climate change impacts on rice growth and rice yield under 1.5 and 2.0 °C warming scenarios, respectively, are simulated using the Ceres-Rice Model based on high-quality, agricultural, experimental, meteorological and soil data, and the incorporation of future climate data generated by four Global Climate Models (GCMs) in the Pearl River Delta, China. The climatic data is extracted from four Global Climate Models (GCMs) namely: The Community Atmosphere Model 4 (CAM4), The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts-Hamburg 6 (ECHAM6), Model for Interdisciplinary Research On Climate 5 (MIROC5) and the Norwegian Earth System Model 1 (NorESM1). The modeling results show that climate change has major negative impacts on both rice growth and rice yields at all study sites. More specifically, the average of flowering durations decreases by 2.8 days (3.9 days), and the maturity date decreases by 11.0 days (14.7 days) under the 1.5 °C and (2.0 °C) warming scenarios, respectively. The yield for early mature rice and late mature rice are reduced by 292.5 kg/ha (558.9 kg/ha) and 151.8 kg/ha (380.0 kg/ha) under the 1.5 °C (2.0 °C) warming scenarios, respectively. Adjusting the planting dates of eight days later and 15 days earlier for early mature rice and late mature rice are simulated to be adaptively effective, respectively. The simulated optimum fertilizer amount is about 240 kg/ha, with different industrial fertilizer and organic matter being applied. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Perceived Climate Variability and Farm Level Adaptation in the Central River Region of The Gambia
Atmosphere 2019, 10(7), 423; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070423 - 23 Jul 2019
Abstract
In Sub-Saharan Africa, the recurring erratic and uneven rainfall distribution has resulted in low crop yields, income losses, and low food stock. In response to these climate change challenges, farmers have recourse to several coping strategies to survive. This present paper explores farmers’ [...] Read more.
In Sub-Saharan Africa, the recurring erratic and uneven rainfall distribution has resulted in low crop yields, income losses, and low food stock. In response to these climate change challenges, farmers have recourse to several coping strategies to survive. This present paper explores farmers’ perception of climate variability and the coping strategies in use in the Central River Region of The Gambia. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze perceived climate variability and farm level adaptation options in the region. Data were collected from 283 farmhouses through transect walks, quantitative surveys including the use focus group discussions. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results revealed that farmers generally perceive an increase in the frequency of extreme weather events and a decrease in the duration of the growing season. With regards to vulnerability and severity, nearly 95% of the respondents considered the dryness as the main threat to their farming activities and perceived its consequences as the most severe. The results equally showed that the perception of changes is linked to the adoption of some adaptation measures among which the preferred were the use of chemical fertilizers (66%), though it is stated to be the most expensive. The Spearman correlation test showed that the use of water conservation techniques is highly correlated with the quality of soil surface structure (p ≤ 0.01) and soil storage capacity (p ≤ 0.01). Findings of this study are of paramount importance in planning and implementing adaptation policies in The Gambia and beyond. To improve farmers’ resilience, drought tolerant crops should be promoted along with climate change and variability awareness campaigns. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Yield Data Provide New Insight into the Dynamic Evaluation of Maize’s Climate Suitability: A Case Study in Jilin Province, China
Atmosphere 2019, 10(6), 305; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10060305 - 03 Jun 2019
Abstract
Examining the effects of climate change on spring maize, and its suitability under dynamic cultivation patterns, will aid strategic decision-making for future agricultural adaptation. This paper investigates the climate suitability of spring maize, based on daily data from 50 meteorological stations, and statistics [...] Read more.
Examining the effects of climate change on spring maize, and its suitability under dynamic cultivation patterns, will aid strategic decision-making for future agricultural adaptation. This paper investigates the climate suitability of spring maize, based on daily data from 50 meteorological stations, and statistics on maize yield and area at the county level in Jilin Province, China, between 1986 and 2015. Based on a significant correlation between the cultivation patterns indicator ≥10 °C accumulated temperature (AAT10) and the average yield (R2 = 0.503), the yield data are used to determine suitable thresholds for meteorological factors under the dynamic cultivation pattern, and a fuzzy fitness approach is used to evaluate the climate suitability. The results showed a good agreement between suitability estimates and scaled observed yields (average d = 0.705). Moreover, good consistency between cultivation patterns, climate suitability and yield show that the late-maturing varieties of maize have gradually moved northward and eastward, and the areas of high suitability and high yield have gradually expanded eastward. In addition, drought and chilling hazard factors limit the suitability of climate resources, especially in the eastern and western regions. Full article
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