Special Issue "Atmospheric Carbonaceous Aerosols"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Aerosols".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Petri Tiitta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, FI-70210 Kuopio, Finland
Interests: atmospheric aerosols; AMS; combustion aerosols; atmospheric pollution
Dr. Liqing Hao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, FI-70210 Kuopio, Finland
Interests: secondary organic aerosol; aerosol–cloud interaction; aerosol mass spectrometer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbonaceous aerosols have increasingly drawn scientific attention for their significant adverse climate and health effects. The carbonaceous aerosol consists of organics and elemental carbon, which is generally referred to as black carbon (BC/rBC/EC). BC absorbs solar radiation causing positive climate radiative forcing and also influences clouds. Primary carbonaceous aerosols are emitted directly from combustion or industrial processes. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA), part of carbonaceous aerosols, are formed via nucleation, condensation, and the heterogeneous reactions of organic compounds. SOA lead to climate impacts through the scattering and absorption of sunlight and their participation in cloud formation. Knowledge of the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on climate change and health is incomplete. A comprehensive and predictive understanding of the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on regional and global scales requires the quantification of their chemical composition and associated physical and optical properties. Furthermore, understanding the dynamics and transformation of carbonaceous particles is essential and needs wide-ranging research. In this Special Issue, we invite submissions of research papers within the topic of carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere, addressing the following perspectives: 

•         Black/elemental carbon
•         SOA formation and aging
•         Chemical composition and carbon nanostructure
•         Brown carbon and refractory organics
•         Source apportionment and emission inventories
•        Air quality and modeling studies

Dr. Petri Tiitta
Dr. Liqing Hao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Black/elemental carbon
  • Organic and brown carbon
  • Chemical composition
  • Physical and optical properties
  • Transformation/aging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Can the Aerosol Absorption Ångström Exponent Represent Aerosol Color in the Atmosphere: A Numerical Study
Atmosphere 2020, 11(2), 187; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11020187 - 11 Feb 2020
Abstract
The aerosol absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) is widely used to indicate aerosol absorption spectrum variations and is an important parameter for characterizing aerosol optical absorption properties. This study discusses the relationship between aerosol AAEs and their colors numerically. By combining light scattering simulations, [...] Read more.
The aerosol absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) is widely used to indicate aerosol absorption spectrum variations and is an important parameter for characterizing aerosol optical absorption properties. This study discusses the relationship between aerosol AAEs and their colors numerically. By combining light scattering simulations, a two-stream radiative transfer model, and an RGB (Red, Green, and Blue) color model, aerosol colors that can be sensed by human eyes are numerically generated with both the solar spectrum and human eye response taken into account. Our results indicate that the responses of human eyes to visible light might be more significant than the incident spectrum in the simulation of aerosol color in the atmosphere. Using the improved numerical simulation algorithm, we obtain the color change of absorption aerosols with different AAEs. When the AAE value is small, the color of the aerosol is generally black and gray. When the AAE value increases to approximately 2 and the difference between the light transmittances at wavelengths of 400 nm and 730 nm is greater than 0.2, the aerosol will appear brown or yellow Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Carbonaceous Aerosols)
Open AccessArticle
Carbonaceous Aerosols in Contrasting Atmospheric Environments in Greek Cities: Evaluation of the EC-tracer Methods for Secondary Organic Carbon Estimation
Atmosphere 2020, 11(2), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11020161 - 04 Feb 2020
Abstract
This study examines the carbonaceous-aerosol characteristics at three contrasting urban environments in Greece (Ioannina, Athens, and Heraklion), on the basis of 12 h sampling during winter (January to February 2013), aiming to explore the inter-site differences in atmospheric composition and carbonaceous-aerosol characteristics and [...] Read more.
This study examines the carbonaceous-aerosol characteristics at three contrasting urban environments in Greece (Ioannina, Athens, and Heraklion), on the basis of 12 h sampling during winter (January to February 2013), aiming to explore the inter-site differences in atmospheric composition and carbonaceous-aerosol characteristics and sources. The winter-average organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations in Ioannina were found to be 28.50 and 4.33 µg m−3, respectively, much higher than those in Heraklion (3.86 µg m−3 for OC and 2.29 µg m−3 for EC) and Athens (7.63 µg m−3 for OC and 2.44 µg m−3 for EC). The winter OC/EC ratio in Ioannina (6.53) was found to be almost three times that in Heraklion (2.03), indicating a larger impact of wood combustion, especially during the night, whereas in Heraklion, emissions from biomass burning were found to be less intense. Estimations of primary and secondary organic carbon (POC and SOC) using the EC-tracer method, and specifically its minimum R-squared (MRS) variant, revealed large differences between the sites, with a prevalence of POC (67–80%) in Ioannina and Athens and with a larger SOC fraction (53%) in Heraklion. SOC estimates were also obtained using the 5% and 25% percentiles of the OC/EC data to determine the (OC/EC)pri, leading to results contrasting to the MRS approach in Ioannina (70–74% for SOC). Although the MRS method provides generally more robust results, it may significantly underestimate SOC levels in environments highly burdened by biomass burning, as the fast-oxidized semi-volatile OC associated with combustion sources is classified in POC. Further analysis in Athens revealed that the difference in SOC estimates between the 5% percentile and MRS methods coincided with the semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol as quantified by aerosol mass spectrometry. Finally, the OC/Kbb+ ratio was used as tracer for decomposition of the POC into fossil-fuel and biomass-burning components, indicating the prevalence of biomass-burning POC, especially in Ioannina (77%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Carbonaceous Aerosols)
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