Special Issue "Development, Evaluation, and Applications of Online Coupled Meteorology–Chemistry Models"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Paolo Tuccella Website E-Mail
Universita degli Studi dell'Aquila, Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, L'Aquila, Italy
Interests: air quality; aerosol-radiation interaction; aerosol-cloud interaction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Meteorological and chemical processes are not independent, but they are coupled in the real atmosphere. Meteorology affects the transport of chemical pollutants through the wind and turbulence, while clouds and precipitation influence air quality through wet scavenging processes. At the same time, chemical processes affect meteorology, for example, through aerosols’ direct and indirect effects. In the last decade, many online coupled meteorology–chemistry models have been developed in order to simulate the complex interaction between meteorological and chemical processes. The key uncertainties in simulating the meteorology–chemistry feedback arise from the treatment of direct and indirect effects. Reliable simulation of the direct effect requires an accurate representation of aerosol size distribution, composition, and aerosol optical properties. Modeling of the aerosol indirect effect also depends on aerosol size distribution and composition, but its accuracy is also affected by the parameterizations of aerosol activation and ice nucleation. As shown by the IPCC report, the understanding of these processes by the scientific community is low and significantly affects the range of uncertainties in the evaluation of their effects on the climate and weather systems. Meaningful evaluations of the meteorology–chemistry feedbacks are often limited by the lack of simultaneous observations of aerosol size distribution and composition, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) concentrations, radiation, aerosol, and cloud optical properties.

Manuscripts presenting developments, improvements, and evaluations of coupled models, and their applications from weather and short-term predictions to climate simulations are welcome for this Special Issue.

Dr. Paolo Tuccella
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Online model
  • Aerosol–radiation interaction
  • Aerosol–cloud interaction
  • Aerosol direct effect
  • Aerosol semidirect effect
  • Aerosol indirect effect
  • Aerosol glaciation indirect effect
  • Model evaluation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Aerosol Indirect Effects on the Predicted Precipitation in a Global Weather Forecasting Model
Atmosphere 2019, 10(7), 392; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070392 - 12 Jul 2019
Abstract
Aerosol indirect effects on precipitation were investigated in this study using a Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs) linked with a chemistry package devised for reducing the heavy computational burden occurring in common atmosphere–chemistry coupling models. The chemistry package was based on the Goddard [...] Read more.
Aerosol indirect effects on precipitation were investigated in this study using a Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs) linked with a chemistry package devised for reducing the heavy computational burden occurring in common atmosphere–chemistry coupling models. The chemistry package was based on the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport scheme of Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem), and five tracers that are relatively important for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) formation were treated as prognostic variables. For coupling with the cloud physics processes in the GRIMs, the CCN number concentrations derived from the simplified chemistry package were utilized in the cumulus parameterization scheme (CPS) and the microphysics scheme (MPS). The simulated CCN number concentrations were higher than those used in original cloud physics schemes and, overall, the amount of incoming shortwave radiation reaching the ground was indirectly reduced by an increase in clouds owing to a high CCN. The amount of heavier precipitation increased over the tropics owing to the inclusion of enhanced riming effects under deep precipitating convection. The trend regarding the changes in non-convective precipitation was mixed depending on the atmospheric conditions. The increase in small-size cloud water owing to a suppressed autoconversion led to a reduction in precipitation. More precipitation can occur when ice particles fall under high CCN conditions owing to the accretion of cloud water by snow and graupel, along with their melting. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Implementation of Aerosol-Cloud Interaction within WRF-CHIMERE Online Coupled Model: Evaluation and Investigation of the Indirect Radiative Effect from Anthropogenic Emission Reduction on the Benelux Union
Atmosphere 2019, 10(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10010020 - 08 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The indirect effects of aerosol are particularly important over regions where meteorological conditions and aerosol content are favourable to cloud formation. This was observed during the Intensive Cloud Aerosol Measurement Campaign (IMPACT) (European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air quality Interaction [...] Read more.
The indirect effects of aerosol are particularly important over regions where meteorological conditions and aerosol content are favourable to cloud formation. This was observed during the Intensive Cloud Aerosol Measurement Campaign (IMPACT) (European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air quality Interaction (EUCAARI) project) in the Benelux Union during May 2008. To better understand this cloud formation variability, the indirect effects of aerosol have been included within the WRF-CHIMERE online model. By comparing model results to the aircraft measurements of IMPACT, to surface measurements from EMEP and AIRBASE and to MODIS satellite measurements, we showed that the model is able to simulate the variability and order of magnitude of the observed number of condensation nuclei (CN), even if some differences are identified for specific aerosol size and location. To quantify the impact of the local anthropogenic emissions on cloud formation, a sensitivity study is performed by halving the surface emissions fluxes. It is shown that the indirect radiative effect (IRE) at the surface is positive for both shortwave and longwave with a net warming of +0.99 W/m2. In addition, important instantaneous changes are modelled at local scale with up to ±6 °C for temperatures and ±50 mm/day for precipitation. Full article
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Atmosphere, EISSN 2073-4433, Published by MDPI AG
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