Special Issue "Atmospheric Acoustic-Gravity Waves"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sergey Kshevetskii
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics and Technology, Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, Russia Federation
Interests: numerical and analytical study of wave processes; acoustic-gravity waves; turbulence; infrasound
Dr. Sergey N. Kulichkov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation
Interests: internal gravity waves; atmospheric acoustic; infrasound; atmospheric monitoring; remote sensing of the atmosphere

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Acoustic-gravity waves exist in the atmosphere constantly and affect many processes in the atmosphere: chemical composition, jet currents, and vertical temperature profile. Rapid weather changes can often be associated with the existence of atmospheric internal gravity waves, which are a special case of acoustic-gravity waves. Often, the occurrence of these waves is due to meteorological processes in which large amounts of heat are released/absorbed due to water vapor condenses or water droplets evaporate. Acoustic-gravity waves are often the forerunners of extreme hydrodynamic phenomena such as tornadoes and convection. Therefore, observations of these waves and their study contribute to reducing risks. Formed in the atmosphere by intense convection, squalls can be dangerous for aviation.

This Special Issue of the journal focuses on acoustic-gravity waves. We are looking for studies that investigate acoustic-gravity waves; their generation; the propagation of waves from various sources, including waves arising from sea-surface oscillations during storms and tsunamis; and waves arising when air flows around orographic obstacles; as well as research on the interaction of waves with the atmosphere. Research based on observations and research based on the modeling of the phenomena under study are both welcome. Manuscripts can also focus on the effects of these waves on jet currents and the atmospheric temperature regime, or on the ionosphere. Also, manuscripts on the experimental study and modeling of tornadoes, investigations of acoustic-gravity waves generated by this phenomenon, and their registration, and observations of tornadoes on the waves generated by this phenomenon, are welcome. We would also like to include research on the effects of acoustic-gravity waves on people and the environment.

Dr. Sergey Kshevetskii
Dr. Sergey N. Kulichkov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Acoustic-gravity waves
  • Infrasound
  • Numerical simulation
  • Internal gravity waves
  • Turbulence

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Method for Determining Neutral Wind Velocity Vectors Using Measurements of Internal Gravity Wave Group and Phase Velocities
Atmosphere 2019, 10(9), 546; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10090546 - 13 Sep 2019
Abstract
This study presents a new method for determining a neutral wind velocity vector. The basis of the method is measurement of the group velocities of internal gravity waves. Using the case of the Boussinesq dispersion relation, we demonstrated the ability to measure a [...] Read more.
This study presents a new method for determining a neutral wind velocity vector. The basis of the method is measurement of the group velocities of internal gravity waves. Using the case of the Boussinesq dispersion relation, we demonstrated the ability to measure a neutral wind velocity vector using the group velocity and wave vector data. An algorithm for obtaining the group velocity vector from the wave vector spectrum is proposed. The new method was tested by comparing the obtained winter wind pattern with wind data from other sources. Testing the new method showed that it is in quantitative agreement with the Fabry–Pérot interferometer wind measurements for zonal and vertical wind velocities. The differences in meridional wind velocities are also discussed here. Of particular interest were the results related to the measurement of vertical wind velocities. We demonstrated that two independent methods gave the presence of vertical wind velocities with amplitude of ~20 m/s. Estimation of vertical wind contribution to plasma drift velocity indicated the importance of vertical wind measurements and the need to take them into account in physical and empirical models of the ionosphere and thermosphere. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Acoustic-Gravity Waves)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigations of Atmospheric Waves in the Earth Lower Ionosphere by Means of the Method of the Creation of the Artificial Periodic Irregularities of the Ionospheric Plasma
Atmosphere 2019, 10(8), 450; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10080450 - 06 Aug 2019
Abstract
We present results of the studies of internal gravity waves based on altitude-time dependences of the temperature and the density of the neutral component and the velocity of the vertical plasma motion at altitudes of the lower ionosphere (60–130 km). The vertical plasma [...] Read more.
We present results of the studies of internal gravity waves based on altitude-time dependences of the temperature and the density of the neutral component and the velocity of the vertical plasma motion at altitudes of the lower ionosphere (60–130 km). The vertical plasma velocity, which in the specified altitude range is equal to the velocity of the neutral component, the temperature, and the density of the neutral atmosphere are determined by the method of the resonant scattering of radio waves by artificial periodic irregularities (APIs) of the ionosphere plasma. We have developed an API technique and now we are evolving it for studying the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere using the Sura heating facility (56.1 N; 46.1 E), Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. An advantage of the API technique is the opportunity to determine the parameters of the undisturbed natural environment under a disturbance of the ionosphere by a field of powerful high frequency radio waves. Analysis of altitude-time variations of the neutral temperature, the density, and the vertical plasma velocity allows one to estimate periods of atmospheric waves propagation. Wavelike variations with a period from 5 min to 3 h and more are clearly determined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Acoustic-Gravity Waves)
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Open AccessArticle
How Can the International Monitoring System Infrasound Network Contribute to Gravity Wave Measurements?
Atmosphere 2019, 10(7), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070399 - 16 Jul 2019
Abstract
Gravity waves (GWs) propagate horizontally and vertically in the atmosphere. They transport energy and momentum, and therefore GWs can affect the atmospheric circulation at different altitude layers when dissipating. Thus knowledge about the occurrence of GWs is essential for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). [...] Read more.
Gravity waves (GWs) propagate horizontally and vertically in the atmosphere. They transport energy and momentum, and therefore GWs can affect the atmospheric circulation at different altitude layers when dissipating. Thus knowledge about the occurrence of GWs is essential for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). However, uniform networks for covering GW measurements globally are rare, especially in the troposphere. It has been shown that an infrasound station of the International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound network is capable of measuring GWs at the Earth’s surface. The IMS was deployed for monitoring the atmosphere to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty. In this study, the Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation Method (PMCC) is used for re-processing up to 20 years of IMS infrasound recordings in order to derive GW detections. For this purpose, two alternative PMCC configurations are discussed, covering GW frequencies equivalent to periods of between 5 min and 150 min. These detections mainly reflect sources of deep convection, particularly in the tropics. At mid-latitudes, coherent wind noise more often produces spurious detections. Combining the results of both configurations provides a global dataset of ground-based GW measurements, which enables the calculation of GW parameters. These can be used for improving NWP models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Acoustic-Gravity Waves)
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