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How Can the International Monitoring System Infrasound Network Contribute to Gravity Wave Measurements?

1
Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), B4.3, 30655 Hannover, Germany
2
Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA), DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2019, 10(7), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070399
Received: 10 June 2019 / Revised: 5 July 2019 / Accepted: 12 July 2019 / Published: 16 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Acoustic-Gravity Waves)
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Abstract

Gravity waves (GWs) propagate horizontally and vertically in the atmosphere. They transport energy and momentum, and therefore GWs can affect the atmospheric circulation at different altitude layers when dissipating. Thus knowledge about the occurrence of GWs is essential for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). However, uniform networks for covering GW measurements globally are rare, especially in the troposphere. It has been shown that an infrasound station of the International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound network is capable of measuring GWs at the Earth’s surface. The IMS was deployed for monitoring the atmosphere to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty. In this study, the Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation Method (PMCC) is used for re-processing up to 20 years of IMS infrasound recordings in order to derive GW detections. For this purpose, two alternative PMCC configurations are discussed, covering GW frequencies equivalent to periods of between 5 min and 150 min. These detections mainly reflect sources of deep convection, particularly in the tropics. At mid-latitudes, coherent wind noise more often produces spurious detections. Combining the results of both configurations provides a global dataset of ground-based GW measurements, which enables the calculation of GW parameters. These can be used for improving NWP models. View Full-Text
Keywords: International Monitoring System (IMS); infrasound; gravity waves; Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT); atmospheric dynamics; ARISE; PMCC International Monitoring System (IMS); infrasound; gravity waves; Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT); atmospheric dynamics; ARISE; PMCC
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Hupe, P.; Ceranna, L.; Le Pichon, A. How Can the International Monitoring System Infrasound Network Contribute to Gravity Wave Measurements? Atmosphere 2019, 10, 399.

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