Special Issue "Towards a Systems Biology Approach"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jong Bong Lee
Website
Guest Editor
Janssen Research and Development, The Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson and Johnson
Interests: clinical pharmacology, systems pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, biopharmaceutics, modeling and simulations
Dr. Pavel Gershkovich
Website
Guest Editor
University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
Dr. Tae Hwan Kim

Guest Editor
College of Pharmacy, Daegu Catholic University, D7 408, Hayang-Ro 13-13, Hayang-Eup, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongbuk 38430, Korea
Interests: pharmacokinetics; pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling; physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling; quantitative system pharmacology (QSP) modeling; in vivo-in vitro correlation (IVIVC) modeling; drug metabolism/pharmacokinetic screening; pharmaceutical analysis (LC-MS/MS, HPLC)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advancement in experimental instrumentation and techniques coupled with enhanced computational powers has brought about the evolution of systems biology. This integrates quantifiable data with respective mechanisms to allow the understanding of the broader pathways and systems in the fields of biology, physiology, pharmacology and toxicology. However, it is acknowledged that there still remains much to be revealed in any system and that quantification is not always done for all the observations. Data availability and integrity are vital for the systems biology approach to be successful, and we need to uncover and quantify many more mechanisms and pathways in order to avoid models with excessive uncertainty and unnecessary assumptions.

Therefore, in this Special Issue, we would like to invite manuscripts describing not only successful cases of systems biology approach but also the data that contribute to efforts that enable such an approach. The specific scope of this Special Issue includes but is not limited to:

  • Systems biology approach (encompassing the fields of biology, physiology, pharmacology and toxicology)
  • In vitro, ex vivo and/or in vivo research that contributes to a future systems biology approach
  • Novel experimental approach that uncovers novel data needed for a systems biology approach
  • Novel method for the quantification of observations or improvement in quantitative methods that can be utilized in a systems biology approach
  • Conventional modeling approach including physiology-relevant or physiologically based models that can lead to a systems biology approach
  • Model simulations data based on appropriate assumptions and compelling hypotheses

Dr. Jong Bong Lee
Dr. Pavel Gershkovich
Dr. Tae Hwan Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • systems biology
  • systems pharmacology
  • quantitative sciences
  • modeling and simulations
  • physiologically based model
  • mathematical model

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Predicting Intestinal and Hepatic First-Pass Metabolism of Orally Administered Testosterone Undecanoate
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(20), 7283; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10207283 - 18 Oct 2020
Abstract
The bioavailability of orally administered drugs could be impacted by intestinal and hepatic first-pass metabolism. Testosterone undecanoate (TU), an orally administered ester prodrug of testosterone, is significantly subjected to first-pass metabolism. However, the individual contribution of intestinal and hepatic first-pass metabolism is not [...] Read more.
The bioavailability of orally administered drugs could be impacted by intestinal and hepatic first-pass metabolism. Testosterone undecanoate (TU), an orally administered ester prodrug of testosterone, is significantly subjected to first-pass metabolism. However, the individual contribution of intestinal and hepatic first-pass metabolism is not well determined. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to predict the metabolic contribution of each site. The hydrolysis–time profiles of TU incubation in human liver microsomes and Caco-2 cell homogenate were used to predict hepatic and intestinal first-pass metabolism, respectively. The in vitro half-life (t1/2 inv) for the hydrolysis of TU in microsomal mixtures was 28.31 ± 3.51 min. By applying the “well-stirred” model, the fraction of TU that could escape hepatic first-pass metabolism (FH) was predicted as 0.915 ± 0.009. The incubation of TU in Caco-2 cell homogenate yielded t1/2 inv of 109.28 ± 21.42 min, which was applied in a “Q gut” model to estimate the fraction of TU that would escape intestinal first-pass metabolism (FG) as 0.114 ± 0.02. Accordingly, only 11% of the absorbed fraction of TU could escape intestinal metabolism, while 91% can pass through hepatic metabolism. Hence, compared to the liver, the intestinal wall is the main site where TU is significantly metabolised during first-pass effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards a Systems Biology Approach)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Gliclazide: Biopharmaceutics Characteristics to Discuss the Biowaiver of Immediate and Extended Release Tablets
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(20), 7131; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10207131 - 13 Oct 2020
Abstract
The lists of essential medicines of the World Health Organization (WHO) and Brazil include gliclazide as an alternative to the oral antidiabetic drug of first choice, metformin, in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus because of its pharmacokinetic profile and few side [...] Read more.
The lists of essential medicines of the World Health Organization (WHO) and Brazil include gliclazide as an alternative to the oral antidiabetic drug of first choice, metformin, in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus because of its pharmacokinetic profile and few side effects. Thus, it is also considered by WHO and the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) as a drug candidate to biowaiver, which is the evaluation of how favorable the biopharmaceutics characteristics are in order to obtain waiver from the relative bioavailability/bioequivalence (RB/BE) studies to register new medicines. This paper presents a review about the solubility, permeability and dissolution of gliclazide. A critical analysis of the information allowed to identify gliclazide as a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) Class II drug. Therefore, new drugs in immediate release dosage forms will not be eligible for biowaiver. Regarding the extended release dosage forms, besides the limited solubility, no information on the comparative dissolution profile was found, which would be necessary to analyze a possible biowaiver for a smaller dosage. It can be concluded that the registration of new medicines containing gliclazide must undergo RB/BE studies, since there is not enough evidence to recommend the replacement and waiver of such studies for immediate and extended release formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards a Systems Biology Approach)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop