Special Issue "Recycled Materials for Construction Applications"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 3979

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ayodele Olofinjana
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Science, Technology and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD 4556, Australia
Interests: energy materials; Pb-free electrical interconnect; rapid solidification; thermal processing; structure–property
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Christophe Gerber
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Science, Technology and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs Drive, QLD 4556, Australia
Interests: sustainable structures and materials; building energy efficiency; timber structures and timber composites; timber durability; bamboo composites; GFRP-reinforced concrete; recycled materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rapid urbanization and the development of new projects all around the world has meant that the global annual consumption of construction materials is increasing. The massive annual utilization of materials in construction means that the construction industry has the reputation of having a negative impact on the environment. Many attempts are now in place to improve the green credentials of construction either through improving the energy demand of materials processing or more directly by reducing the consumption of freshly mined materials. The large volume of non-degradable wastes normally destined for landfills are an available resource for recycling and reuse. While many municipal authorities now operate waste resource centers equipped to process and sort wastes into construction and demolition, plastics, and ceramics and glass, the construction industry is slow in the uptake of these resources. The numerous works of researchers in the utilization of recycled materials in construction are yet to make the necessary impact.

There is renewed interest in the use of recycled materials through the use of available recycled resources to give construction greener credentials that are being imposed by the societal focus on the sustainability and environmental impacts of businesses. Sustainability therefore has become a significant focus in engineering practice.

This Applied Sciences Special Issue aims to compile all works that address the many issues involved in the reuse of materials, including waste resources processing, optimization of substitutions for freshly mined components, functional properties, reliability issues, the economics of utilization, life cycle analysis, and end of life issues. The scope covers but is not limited to investigations on the reuse of recovered materials, including:

  • Plastics;
  • Steel and metals;
  • Concrete aggregate;
  • Sand glass and ceramics;
  • Asphaltic materials; and
  • Industrial wastes.

Dr. Ayodele Olofinjana
Dr. Christophe Gerber
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • recycled concrete aggregate
  • recycled asphaltic materials
  • recycled plastics
  • recycled glass
  • recycled sand
  • recycled steel and metals
  • packaging materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Effect of Curing Conditions on Selected Properties of Recycled Aggregate Concrete
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(13), 4441; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10134441 - 27 Jun 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 821
Abstract
The paper presents the influence of different curing conditions—wet, dry, and protection against water evaporation (PEV)—on selected properties of concretes with different amounts of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) previously subjected to atmospheric CO2 sequestration. Two types of cement were used, Portland cement [...] Read more.
The paper presents the influence of different curing conditions—wet, dry, and protection against water evaporation (PEV)—on selected properties of concretes with different amounts of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) previously subjected to atmospheric CO2 sequestration. Two types of cement were used, Portland cement and blast-furnace slag cement. The study was performed in laboratory conditions (at the temperature of 20 ± 1 °C and relative humidity of about 60%), according to currently applicable test procedures for most of the measured characteristics of concrete. Additionally, the eco-efficiency indexes (bi and ci) as well as the eco-durability S-CO2 index were calculated. It was found that dry conditions cause the properties of concrete to deteriorate, especially concrete made of blast-furnace slag cement, while PEV allows the achievement of results comparable to wet conditions. Moreover, for series with the highest amounts of coarse recycled aggregate and after longer periods of curing, the difference between the effects of wet curing and protection against water evaporation disappears. The eco-efficiency and eco-durability indexes approach confirms the beneficial effect of blast-furnace slag cement used as a binder, but on the condition of using a proper way of curing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials for Construction Applications)
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Article
Frost Resistance of Coal Gangue Aggregate Concrete Modified by Steel Fiber and Slag Powder
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(9), 3229; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10093229 - 06 May 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 879
Abstract
Coal gangue, a by-product produced during the process of coal mining and washing, has a serious impact on the environment. Using coal gangue as a concrete aggregate has been proven helpful in potentially improving its value and reducing its environmental impact to a [...] Read more.
Coal gangue, a by-product produced during the process of coal mining and washing, has a serious impact on the environment. Using coal gangue as a concrete aggregate has been proven helpful in potentially improving its value and reducing its environmental impact to a certain extent. However, the high water absorption and low strength of coal gangue aggregate cause a poor frost resistance of coal gangue aggregate concrete (CGAC), and thus limits its application in cold areas. This study attempted to modify the CGAC with steel fibers (including hooked-end, undulated, and copper-plated steel fiber) and slag powder, and investigated its frost resistance. Moreover, the impact that steel fiber and slag powder had on air-void characteristics of CGAC was also analyzed. The results show that when steel fibers were incorporated into CGAC, the compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of CGAC reduced significantly after freezing/thawing and that they experienced the smallest reduction when the content of the steel fiber was 1 vol.% and the undulated steel fibers worked best. However, the effect of slag powder on frost resistance of CGAC at an early age was not obvious, which may be related to the slower pozzolanic reaction of slag powder. Incorporating steel fiber or slag powder into CGAC can optimize its mesostructure and make the air-voids of concrete smaller, which is beneficial to its frost resistance. The results provide a good way to improve the performance of CGAC, expand its application in cold regions, and reduce the pollution caused by coal gangue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials for Construction Applications)
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Review

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Review
Evaluation of Performance and Challenges of Use of Waste Materials in Pavement Construction: A Critical Review
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(1), 226; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10010226 - 27 Dec 2019
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 1911
Abstract
Paved surfaces must reliably bear heavy loads, often under challenging environmental and geotechnical conditions. These requirements are addressed through the use of high-quality, newly produced materials in pavement design. However, in remote locations, newly produced materials are often expensive or unavailable, making waste [...] Read more.
Paved surfaces must reliably bear heavy loads, often under challenging environmental and geotechnical conditions. These requirements are addressed through the use of high-quality, newly produced materials in pavement design. However, in remote locations, newly produced materials are often expensive or unavailable, making waste or alternative materials more attractive. Waste materials can be used in their natural condition but are more commonly stabilised or otherwise improved to meet performance targets. However, this practice can incorporate unwarranted risk into pavement design solutions. The decision to use waste materials in a pavement is a balance between technical risk, maintenance liability, available materials, environmental emissions and capital cost. This study reviews the use of waste materials in pavement design and construction. Reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) materials and processed waste plastic for pavement construction are considered. Additionally, blast furnace slag (BFS) and waste glass in pavement construction are evaluated. This review focuses on the effects of alternative materials on the properties of asphalt pavement. The results indicate that RAP is acceptable as an alternative material, while BFS, waste plastic and waste glass can be used under specific conditions. Also, the current and future challenges for the use of waste materials in the pavement industry are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials for Construction Applications)
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