Special Issue "Application of Plasma Technology in Bioscience and Biomedicine"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniela Boehm
Website
Guest Editor
College of Sciences and Health, Technological University Dublin, Dublin D7, Ireland
Interests: cold atmospheric plasma; plasma medicine; plasma activated liquids; antimicrobial effects; cytotoxicity; cancer
Dr. Cristina Canal
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy (CMEM), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), 08034 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: cold plasmas for biomedical applications; surface modification of biomaterials; control of drug release from biomaterials; therapeutical appications of cold plasmas

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plasma technology has been an integral part of life sciences research for decades through its role in the manufacture and modification of material surface characteristics of many common laboratory consumables. However, in recent years, the use of plasma at room temperature and atmospheric pressure (cold atmospheric plasma) has moved into the more immediate focus of bioscience and biomedicine due to its applicability to heat sensitive materials, including biomaterials, cells and tissue.

Plasma can elicit a wide range of biological effects predominantly based on the action of various reactive species generated in the discharge which can modify biomolecules, affect cell growth and behaviour or inactivate microorganisms. Its antimicrobial properties and the ability to control biofilms make cold plasma an interesting candidate for decontamination applications in the environmental, food or medical context. Plasma can on the one hand stimulate cell growth, which can benefit wound healing, and on the other hand inhibit proliferation, which is of interest in cancer treatment. It has been demonstrated that plasma can degrade biomolecules but also modify chemical structures and enzyme activities. Plasma deposition is used for generating material coatings with particular biological functions that increase biocompatibility or reduce cellular or microbial adhesion and find use in medical devices and biosensors. Plasma has also been demonstrated as a useful tool for delivering agents into cells such as nanoparticles, drugs or genes, and it can directly affect cell fate by influencing cell differentiation patterns or tissue regeneration. In addition, plasma-activated/treated liquids generated by exposing liquids to a plasma discharge can achieve many of the aforementioned biological effects induced by direct plasma due to a retention of longer-lived plasma reactive species. Recent years have seen cold plasma move into the clinic for its use in wound healing, and further applications are likely to follow.

In this Special Issue, we would like to cover the breadth and diversity of plasma technology in bioscience and biomedicine and provide a snapshot of some of the exciting research currently happening in this field.

Dr. Daniela Boehm
Dr. Cristina Canal 
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cold atmospheric plasma
  • Plasma medicine
  • Plasma activated/treated liquids
  • Plasma coating
  • Cancer treatment
  • Wound healing
  • Biocompatibility
  • Microbial inactivation
  • Biosensors
  • Surface modification
  • Drug delivery
  • Cell differentiation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Hyaluronan Pericellular Coat and Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment of Cells
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(15), 5024; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10155024 - 22 Jul 2020
Abstract
In different tumors, high amounts of hyaluronan (HA) are correlated with tumor progression. Therefore, new tumor therapy strategies are targeting HA production and degradation. In plasma medicine research, antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on tumor cells were observed using cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) or [...] Read more.
In different tumors, high amounts of hyaluronan (HA) are correlated with tumor progression. Therefore, new tumor therapy strategies are targeting HA production and degradation. In plasma medicine research, antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on tumor cells were observed using cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) or plasma-activated media (PAM). Until now, the influence of PAM on the HA pericellular coat has not been the focus of research. PAM was generated by argon-plasma treatment of Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s Medium via the kINPen®09 plasma jet. The HA expression on PAM-treated HaCaT cells was determined by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Changes in the adhesion behavior of vital cells in PAM were observed by impedance measurement using the xCELLigence system. We found that PAM treatment impaired the HA pericellular coat of HaCaT cells. The time-dependent adhesion was impressively diminished. However, a disturbed HA coat alone was not the reason for the inhibition of cell adhesion because cells enzymatically treated with HAdase did not lose their adhesion capacity completely. Here, we showed for the first time that the plasma-activated medium (PAM) was able to influence the HA pericellular coat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Plasma Technology in Bioscience and Biomedicine)
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Open AccessArticle
The Combination of Plasma-Processed Air (PPA) and Plasma-Treated Water (PTW) Causes Synergistic Inactivation of Candida albicans SC5314
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(9), 3303; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10093303 - 09 May 2020
Abstract
Microwave-induced plasma was used for the generation of plasma-processed air (PPA) and plasma-treated water (PTW). By this way, the plasma was able to functionalize the compressed air and the used water to antimicrobial effective agents. Their fungicidal effects by single and combined application [...] Read more.
Microwave-induced plasma was used for the generation of plasma-processed air (PPA) and plasma-treated water (PTW). By this way, the plasma was able to functionalize the compressed air and the used water to antimicrobial effective agents. Their fungicidal effects by single and combined application were investigated on Candida albicans strain SC5314. The monoculture of C. albicans was cultivated on specimens with polymeric surface structures (PE-stripes). The additive as well as the synergistic fungicidal potential of PPA and PTW was investigated by different process windows of plasma exposure time (5–50 s) and sample treatment time with PPA/PTW (1–5 min). For a single PTW or PPA treatment, an increase in the reduction factor with the indicated treatment time was observed (maximum reduction factor of 1.1 and 1.6, respectively). In comparison, the combined application of PTW and then PPA resulted in antagonistic, additive and synergistic effects, depending on the combination. An application of the synergistically acting processes of PTW for cleaning and PPA for drying can be an innovative alternative to the sanitary processes currently used in production plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Plasma Technology in Bioscience and Biomedicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Antimicrobial Effects of Plasma-Treated Water (PTW) Produced by Microwave-Induced Plasma (MidiPLexc) on Pseudomonas fluorescens Biofilms
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(9), 3118; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10093118 - 29 Apr 2020
Abstract
For the decontamination of surfaces in the food production industry, plasma-generated compounds such as plasma-treated water or plasma-processed air offer many promising possibilities for future applications. Therefore, the antimicrobial effect of water treated with microwave-induced plasma (MidiPLexc) on Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms was investigated. [...] Read more.
For the decontamination of surfaces in the food production industry, plasma-generated compounds such as plasma-treated water or plasma-processed air offer many promising possibilities for future applications. Therefore, the antimicrobial effect of water treated with microwave-induced plasma (MidiPLexc) on Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms was investigated. A total of 10 mL deionized water was treated with the MidiPLexc plasma source for 100, 300 and 900 s (pretreatment time) and the bacterial biofilms were exposed to the plasma-treated water for 1, 3 and 5 min (post-treatment time). To investigate the influence of plasma-treated water on P. fluorescens biofilms, microbiological assays (colony-forming units, fluorescence and XTT assay) and imaging techniques (fluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and atomic force microscopy) were used. The colony-forming units showed a maximum reduction of 6 log10 by using 300 s pretreated plasma water for 5 min. Additionally, a maximum reduction of 81% for the viability of the cells and a 92% reduction in the metabolic activity of the cells were achieved by using 900 s pretreated plasma water for 5 min. The microscopic images showed evident microbial inactivation within the biofilm even at the shortest pretreatment (100 s) and post-treatment (1 min) times. Moreover, reduction of the biofilm thickness and increased cluster formation within the biofilm was detected. Morphologically, the fusion of cell walls into a uniform dense cell mass was detectable. The findings correlated with a decrease in the pH value of the plasma-treated water, which forms the basis for the chemically active components of plasma-treated water and its antimicrobial effects. These results provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of inactivation of biofilms by plasma-generated compounds such as plasma-treated water and thus allow for further parameter adjustment for applications in food industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Plasma Technology in Bioscience and Biomedicine)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
GSH Modification as a Marker for Plasma Source and Biological Response Comparison to Plasma Treatment
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(6), 2025; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10062025 - 17 Mar 2020
Abstract
This study investigated the use of glutathione as a marker to establish a correlation between plasma parameters and the resultant liquid chemistry from two distinct sources to predefined biological outcomes. Two different plasma sources were operated at parameters that resulted in similar biological [...] Read more.
This study investigated the use of glutathione as a marker to establish a correlation between plasma parameters and the resultant liquid chemistry from two distinct sources to predefined biological outcomes. Two different plasma sources were operated at parameters that resulted in similar biological responses: cell viability, mitochondrial activity, and the cell surface display of calreticulin. Specific glutathione modifications appeared to be associated with biological responses elicited by plasma. These modifications were more pronounced with increased treatment time for the European Cooperation in Science and Technology Reference Microplasma Jet (COST-Jet) and increased frequency for the dielectric barrier discharge and were correlated with more potent biological responses. No correlations were found when cells or glutathione were exposed to exogenously added long-lived species alone. This implied that short-lived species and other plasma components were required for the induction of cellular responses, as well as glutathione modifications. These results showed that comparisons of medical plasma sources could not rely on measurements of long-lived chemical species; rather, modifications of biomolecules (such as glutathione) might be better predictors of cellular responses to plasma exposure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Plasma Technology in Bioscience and Biomedicine)
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