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Open AccessArticle

Deposition of Cell Culture Coatings Using a Cold Plasma Deposition Method

1
TheraDep, Questum, Ballingarrane Science and Technology Park, Co. Tipperary, Clonmel, Ireland
2
School of Biosystems and Food Engineering, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin D4, Ireland
3
School of Chemical Sciences, FutureNeuro SFI Research Centre, National Centre for Centre Research, Dublin City University, Dublin D9, Ireland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(19), 6670; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10196670
Received: 13 August 2020 / Revised: 8 September 2020 / Accepted: 18 September 2020 / Published: 24 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Plasma Technology in Bioscience and Biomedicine)
Collagen coatings were applied onto polystyrene microplates using a cold atmospheric pressure plasma process. The coatings were compared to standard wet chemical collagen thin films using microscopy, surface energy, infra-red spectroscopy, electrophoresis, and cell culture techniques. Thin films were also deposited on gold electrodes using both coating methods and their structural and barrier properties probed using cyclic voltammetry. While the wet chemical technique produced a thicker deposit, both films appear equivalent in terms of coverage, porosity, structure, and chemistry. Significantly, the cold plasma method preserves both the primary and secondary structure of the protein and this results in high biocompatibility and cell activity that is at least equivalent to the standard wet chemical technique. The significance of these results is discussed in relation to the benefits of a single step plasma coating in comparison to the traditional multi-step aseptic coating technique. View Full-Text
Keywords: plasma polymerization; corona discharge; biomolecule deposition; collagen; protein voltammetry plasma polymerization; corona discharge; biomolecule deposition; collagen; protein voltammetry
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MDPI and ACS Style

O’Sullivan, D.; McArdle, H.; Ng, S.W.; Bourke, P.; Forster, R.; O’Neill, L. Deposition of Cell Culture Coatings Using a Cold Plasma Deposition Method. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 6670. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10196670

AMA Style

O’Sullivan D, McArdle H, Ng SW, Bourke P, Forster R, O’Neill L. Deposition of Cell Culture Coatings Using a Cold Plasma Deposition Method. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(19):6670. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10196670

Chicago/Turabian Style

O’Sullivan, Denis; McArdle, Hazel; Ng, Sing W.; Bourke, Paula; Forster, Robert; O’Neill, Liam. 2020. "Deposition of Cell Culture Coatings Using a Cold Plasma Deposition Method" Appl. Sci. 10, no. 19: 6670. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10196670

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