Special Issue "Impacts of Climate Change on Marine Organisms"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Sustainable Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. María Aranguren-Gassis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ecology and Animal Biology, University of Vigo, 36310, Vigo, Galicia, Spain
Interests: Plankton ecology; evolution; oceanography; climate change
Dr. Ana Fernandez-Carrera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ecology and Animal Biology, University of Vigo, 36310, Vigo, Galicia, Spain
Interests: phytoplankton ecology; marine N and C cycles; dinitrogen fixation; primary production
Dr. Inés Viana
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ecology and Animal Biology, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Galicia, Spain
Interests: macrophyte ecology; bioindicators; coastal pollution; trait-based approaches; multiple stressor interactions
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change is altering physical and chemical factors, as well as biotic and abiotic interactions, in marine ecosystems. Important environmental drivers, such as temperature, pH, nutrient availability, and salinity, are simultaneously changing. The resulting modification of marine environments is affecting the performance and distribution of marine species on a global scale. To be able to manage marine ecosystems appropriately, we urgently need to understand the biological responses to the new environments generated by climate change. This knowledge will allow us to preserve marine environments and their diversity and functionality.

For this reason, the goal of this Special Issue is to compile novel information on the consequences of climate change for marine organisms in terms of their biology, distribution, and interactions.

The topics of interest for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • metabolic or behavioral responses of marine organisms to environmental changes driven by climate change;
  • effects of climate change on interactions between marine species;
  • impacts of climate change on marine organisms at the ecosystem level; and
  • acclimation and adaptation of marine organisms to the effects of climate change.

Particular attention will be given to those studies that address a topic from a multi-driver perspective and analyze the consequences of interactions between drivers for marine organisms.

Dr. María Aranguren-Gassis
Dr. Ana Fernandez-Carrera
Dr. Inés Viana
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • marine organisms
  • biological response
  • species distribution
  • temperature
  • pH
  • CO2
  • nutrients
  • ecosystem

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Rising Temperature Is a More Important Driver Than Increasing Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in the Trait Responses of Enhalus acoroides Seedlings
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(6), 2730; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11062730 - 18 Mar 2021
Viewed by 448
Abstract
Increasing temperature and CO2 concentration are among the most important factors affecting marine ecosystems under climate change. We investigated the morphological, biochemical, and physiological trait responses of seedlings of the tropical seagrass Enhalus acoroides under experimental conditions. Trait responses were greater under [...] Read more.
Increasing temperature and CO2 concentration are among the most important factors affecting marine ecosystems under climate change. We investigated the morphological, biochemical, and physiological trait responses of seedlings of the tropical seagrass Enhalus acoroides under experimental conditions. Trait responses were greater under temperature effects than increasing CO2 concentration. Seedlings under rising temperatures showed enhanced leaf growth, lower leaf nutrient content, and stimulated down-regulating mechanisms in terms of photo-physiology. Increasing CO2 concentrations did not show any significant effects independently. There was a significant interaction for some of the trait responses considered, such as leaf number and carbon content in the roots, and trends of higher starch concentrations in the leaves and lower rETRmax under combined enriched CO2 and high temperature, even though none of these interactions were synergistic. Understanding the single and interactive trait responses of seagrass seedlings to increasing temperature and CO2 concentration is of importance to determine the relative responses of early life stages of seagrasses, which may differ from adult plants, in order to form a more holistic view of seagrass ecosystem health under climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Climate Change on Marine Organisms)
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