Special Issue "Latest Trend in Cultured Meat Study"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2023 | Viewed by 6875

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jean-François Hocquette
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Muscle Growth and Metabolism Group, Herbivore Research Unit, Animal Husbandry and Nutrition Department, National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and the Environment (INRAE), Paris, France
Interests: muscle biology; beef quality; biochemistry; functional genomics; transcriptomics; muscle biomarkers; meat quality
Prof. Dr. Sghaier Chriki
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Isara - Agro School for Life, Lyon, France
Interests: meat quality; livestock farming systems; cultured meat; meat alternative
Prof. Dr. Marie-Pierre Ellies-Oury
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Herbivores Research Unit, National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and the Environment (INRAE), Paris, France
Interests: animal science (growth, production systems); meat science; meat sensory; nutritional quality; cultured meat; statistics; multivariate analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Most of the current claims on “meat” produced from in vitro-cultured muscle cells, known as “cultured meat” or “artificial meat”, are largely driven by proponents of this new technology or by private companies working in this area. On the other hand, opinions by (conventional) meat producers or animal scientists may be perceived in favor of the conventional meat industry. However, we need a rational scientific debate with a balanced critique of potential benefits of “cultured meat” as an alternative to conventional meat production considering the characteristics of the current livestock farming systems. This Special Issue aims to provide balanced opinions in this area by inviting experts in both “cultured meat” production and/or “animal science” to this Special Issue. Experts are invited to present and discuss any research related to this topic and this includes among others, environmental, technological, nutritional, sensory and safety issues. Interdisciplinary and primary research describing the most recent results are more than welcomed since the scientific literature, despite a great number of review papers in this area is modest, whereas press articles in the public media promoting “cultured meat” are, on the contrary, very numerous.

Dr. Jean-François Hocquette
Prof. Dr. Sghaier Chriki
Prof. Dr. Marie-Pierre Ellies-Oury
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • meat alternative
  • cultured meat
  • food for future
  • foodtech
  • animal proteins

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
An Edible, Decellularized Plant Derived Cell Carrier for Lab Grown Meat
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(10), 5155; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12105155 - 20 May 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2415
Abstract
Rapidly expanding skeletal muscle satellite cells with cost-effective methods have been presented as a solution for meeting the growing global demand for meat. A common strategy for scaling cell proliferation employs microcarriers, small beads designed to support anchorage-dependent cells in suspension-style bioreactors. No [...] Read more.
Rapidly expanding skeletal muscle satellite cells with cost-effective methods have been presented as a solution for meeting the growing global demand for meat. A common strategy for scaling cell proliferation employs microcarriers, small beads designed to support anchorage-dependent cells in suspension-style bioreactors. No carrier has yet been marketed for the cultivation of lab-grown meat. The objective of this study was to demonstrate a rapid, food safe, decellularization procedure to yield cell-free extracellular matrix scaffolds and evaluate them as cell carriers for lab grown meat. Broccoli florets were soaked in SDS, Tween-20, and bleach for 48 h. The decellularization process was confirmed via histology, which showed an absence of cell nuclei, and DNA quantification (0.0037 ± 0.00961 μg DNA/mg tissue). Decellularized carriers were sorted by cross sectional area (7.07 ± 1.74 mm2, 3.03 ± 1.15 mm2, and 0.49 ± 0.3 mm2) measured for eccentricity (0.73 ± 0.16). Density measurements of decellularized carriers (1.01 ± 0.01 g/cm) were comparable to traditional microcarriers. Primary bovine satellite cells were inoculated into and cultured within a reactor containing decellularized carriers. Cell adhesion was observed and cell death was limited to 2.55 ± 1.09%. These studies suggested that broccoli florets may serve as adequate edible carrier scaffolds for satellite cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Trend in Cultured Meat Study)
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Review

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Review
Marketing Strategies for Cultured Meat: A Review
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(17), 8795; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12178795 - 01 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1668
Abstract
Environmentally intense and negative consequences relateing to conventional meat production systems have induced some actors to suggest alternative meat sources. Diseases carried by animals, human perception of cruelty to animals, and public health concerns about cardiovascular diseases have provided the basis for the [...] Read more.
Environmentally intense and negative consequences relateing to conventional meat production systems have induced some actors to suggest alternative meat sources. Diseases carried by animals, human perception of cruelty to animals, and public health concerns about cardiovascular diseases have provided the basis for the development of cultured meat. The current market is influenced by many factors, including regulators, affordability, religion, and media perception. The existing cultured meat market is also regulated by legislatures, affordability, consumer religion, and the media. Consumer perception is distributed across various aspects, including ethical priorities, nutritional profile of the meat consumed, age-based acceptance, gender differentiation, political orientation, land-based attitude, education status, socioeconomic factors, and familiarity factor with the existing product in the market. Inhibiting barriers reported among consumers—including low naturalness, safety, nutritional concerns, trust, neophobia, economic, and ethical approaches—should be employed as marketing tactics directly to address their respective concerns. Tissue culture, starter cells, printing, and 3D printing are some of the methods currently being used for the production of cultured meat. Similarly, many hybrid technologies are also being used to produce meat-like products to increase consumer familiarity along and market presence. Existing research frameworks have improved the previous mindset of consumers with media coverage, educational frameworks, and the textural attributes of cultured meat. Additional benefits of CUME may include being environmentally friendly with less production of greenhouse gases. However, consumer trust, affordability, improving nutritional status, and widescale adoption are just a few of the parameters that need to be addressed to enhance consumer acceptability of these products. The aim of this article was to analyze the current state of cultured meat and the marketing content challenges and strategies used to advance public acceptance of cultured meat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Trend in Cultured Meat Study)
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Review
Biotechnological and Technical Challenges Related to Cultured Meat Production
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(13), 6771; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12136771 - 04 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1962
Abstract
The constant growth of the population has pushed researchers to find novel protein sources. A possible solution to this problem has been found in cellular agriculture, specifically in the production of cultured meat. In the following review, the key steps for the production [...] Read more.
The constant growth of the population has pushed researchers to find novel protein sources. A possible solution to this problem has been found in cellular agriculture, specifically in the production of cultured meat. In the following review, the key steps for the production of in vitro meat are identified, as well as the most important challenges. The main biological and technical approaches are taken into account and discussed, such as the choice of animal, animal-free alternatives to fetal bovine serum (FBS), cell biomaterial interactions, and the implementation of scalable and sustainable biofabrication and culturing systems. In the light of the findings, as promising as cultured meat production is, most of the discussed challenges are in an initial stage. Hence, research must overcome these challenges to ensure efficient large-scale production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Trend in Cultured Meat Study)
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