Special Issue "Aquatic Animal Health in Vulnerable Environments"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 March 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Natalija Topić Popović
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Ruđer Bošković Institute, Laboratory for Aquaculture Biotechnology, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: aquaculture biotechnology; aquatic bacterial pathogens; development of rapid diagnostic methods for bacterial diseases of fish and invertebrates; biological markers for assessment of ecosystem disbalance; fish and shellfish tissue biochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue on “Aquatic Animal Health in Vulnerable Environments” in the Applied Sciences journal. Aquatic animals, whether marine or freshwater, whether farmed or wild, face a number of threats related to their water environment. The technological pressures, occurrence of contaminants, and climate changes are ubiquitous in the environment and cause undesirable ecological effects reflecting on aquatic organisms. Thus, the aim of this Special Issue is to present the latest advances in identifying and resolving challenges related to aquatic animal health in aquacultured and free-living species.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: aquatic animal health, aquaculture, fishery management, fish community composition, genetics, environmental interactions, effects of pollutants on aquatic organisms, statistical approaches for predicting biological responses, and fish welfare.

Although the deadline for submission of manuscripts to this Special Issue is 10 March 2022, I would appreciate hearing from you in the next few weeks as to whether you would like to contribute.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Natalija Topić Popović
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aquatic animal health
  • environmental interactions
  • aquaculture

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Assessment of Stocking Activities on the Native Brown Trout Populations from Nestos River (Southern Balkans) Inferred by mtDNA RFLP and Sequencing Analyses
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(19), 9034; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11199034 - 28 Sep 2021
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Abstract
Alien fish introductions, conducted towards the ichthyofauna enhancement in local drainages, have been occasionally proved harmful for the indigenous freshwater fish populations. The present study was designed to assess the impact of stocking activities, carried out in the past decades with fingerlings originating [...] Read more.
Alien fish introductions, conducted towards the ichthyofauna enhancement in local drainages, have been occasionally proved harmful for the indigenous freshwater fish populations. The present study was designed to assess the impact of stocking activities, carried out in the past decades with fingerlings originating from Acheloos river hatcheries, on the native trout (Salmo sp.) populations of Nestos River, Greece. Trout specimens collected from several tributaries of Nestos River and were analyzed by means of PCR-RFLP and sequencing targeting the mitochondrial ND5-ND6 genes and the entire control region, respectively. It should be mentioned that trouts from Acheloos mainly belong to the marmoratus mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineage, while the autochthonous trouts from Nestos belong to the Adriatic lineage. Both methodologies demonstrated that most samples from the three tributaries located at the lower part of Nestos constitute offspring of the fingerlings transferred from Acheloos hatcheries. Therefore, these tributaries have been strongly affected by stocking activities with a potential complete loss of their autochthonous trout. On the other hand, it seems that trout populations from higher altitude tributaries have not been affected by stockings. Hence, efforts should be undertaken in order to prevent the prevalence of the non-indigenous translocated Salmo in higher altitude tributaries, in conjunction with a management plan designed for the total trout populations from the area, speaking of which it has been recently included to the National Park of Rodopi Mountains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Animal Health in Vulnerable Environments)
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Article
Improving Keeping for Octopuses by Testing Different Escape-Proof Designs on Tanks for “Big Blue Octopus” (Octopus cyanea)
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(18), 8547; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11188547 - 14 Sep 2021
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Abstract
Octopus cyanea has a wide range of natural distribution and is interesting for scientific research. However, unlike Octopus vulgaris, the species is poorly studied, and few data exist on best practices for keeping them. One of the most common reasons for losing [...] Read more.
Octopus cyanea has a wide range of natural distribution and is interesting for scientific research. However, unlike Octopus vulgaris, the species is poorly studied, and few data exist on best practices for keeping them. One of the most common reasons for losing octopuses in human care is their ability to escape from holding tanks. Adult Octopus cyanea (n = 33) were locally collected in Okinawa throughout the year. All animals were housed at the laboratory facilities at the Marine Station of the Okinawa institute of Science and Technology. Animals were kept in a flow-through saltwater system in three different types of holding tanks ranging from 550 L to 600 L tanks or in 2000 L tanks, all with an environment enriched with clay pots or natural rocks as dens. They were fed a daily diet of dead fish or live or dead crustaceans ad libitum. To characterize the effectiveness of different keeping conditions, we compared escape attempts and non-natural deaths during the animals’ time under human care. We found that two types of tanks, the 600 L transparent acrylic glass tanks with weighted lids and the 2000 L tanks with synthetic grass lined walls, had significantly fewer escapes than the 550 L tanks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Animal Health in Vulnerable Environments)
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Article
Evaluation of Praziquantel Efficacy against Zeuxapta seriolae Infections in Greater Amberjack, Seriola dumerili
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(10), 4656; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11104656 - 19 May 2021
Viewed by 460
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of dietary praziquantel (PZQ), a promising fish anthelminthic, against Zeuxapta seriolae, a lethal ectoparasite of greater amberjack (Seriola dumerili Risso) farmed in the Mediterranean and elsewhere. The trial was carried out [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of dietary praziquantel (PZQ), a promising fish anthelminthic, against Zeuxapta seriolae, a lethal ectoparasite of greater amberjack (Seriola dumerili Risso) farmed in the Mediterranean and elsewhere. The trial was carried out in small cages (3 m3) in situ, harbouring fish (125 ± 14 g) naturally infected with Z. seriolae, at 25 ± 1 °C water temperature. Praziquantel-medicated diet (150 mg PZQ/kg fish) was delivered for three days against a control group. Measurement of both adults and oncomiracidia of Z. seriolae in sampled gill arches revealed significant differences between the tested groups (PZQ: 19.3 ± 9.8 vs. Control: 3.8 ± 6.3). Considering an estimated efficacy of 80.4% in the medicated fish, the present study indicates that oral PZQ treatments can confront Z. seriolae infections considerably in farmed greater amberjack and, perhaps, replace the commonly used hydrogen peroxidase baths. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Animal Health in Vulnerable Environments)
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Article
Comparative Tissue Responses of Marine Mollusks on Seasonal Changes in the Northern Adriatic Sea
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(6), 2874; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11062874 - 23 Mar 2021
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Abstract
In the shallow Northern Adriatic, marine mollusks are affected by bottom trawling and seafood disturbance. Seasonal oscillations of oceanographic factors additionally influence their physiology, stress responses and survival. Tissue responses to seasonal variations in green ormer (Haliotis tuberculata L.) and Mediterranean scallop [...] Read more.
In the shallow Northern Adriatic, marine mollusks are affected by bottom trawling and seafood disturbance. Seasonal oscillations of oceanographic factors additionally influence their physiology, stress responses and survival. Tissue responses to seasonal variations in green ormer (Haliotis tuberculata L.) and Mediterranean scallop (Pecten jacobaeus L.) in the Northern Adriatic have not been reported. Hence, their biochemical and antioxidant defense properties over seasons were studied and the microanatomical structure of their tissue was correlated with function. Histological analysis of gonads revealed two peaks of gonadal maturation and spawning during the spring/summer period and winter season for scallops, and one peak during the fall for ormers. The gonadal maturation of both species was correlated with their seasonal variations of metabolic demands and antioxidant capacity. The lipid vacuoles of tubuloacinar terminations in the digestive gland differed between the two species; in scallop they are several-fold larger in size and number. Low temperatures in winter contributed to a decline in enzymatic antioxidant defense in scallop tissues, having lower superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and higher concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidant status (TAS). In ormers, winter induced lower TAS, TBARS, SOD and GPx concentrations. The significant difference of winter TAS and TBARS levels between ormers and scallops was correlated with variations in their reproductive cycles, as well as in antioxidant defense systems. The most important factor for stress-related parameters for both species in this work was found to be the season-induced temperature change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Animal Health in Vulnerable Environments)
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