Special Issue "Advances in Semiconductor Photocatalysis"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Zhongyu Cai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
Interests: photonic photocatalysis; photonic sensing; self-assembly; photonic crystals; plasmonic materials; chemical analysis; chemical separation; colloids and surface chemistry
Prof. Dr. Jia Hong Pan
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Co-Guest Editor
North China Electric Power University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Energy Safety and Clean Utilization, Beijing, China
Interests: semiconductor photocatalysis, perovskite solar cell, self-assembled nanostructures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Semiconductor materials have long been used as photocatalysts for various applications. In recent years, many methods have been developed in order to improve the photocatalytic activity of traditional semiconductor materials such as TiO2. Besides the “old materials”, novel semiconductor materials have been explored for photocatalysis applications, and significant advances have been made. New concepts, like “plasmonic photocatalysis” and “photonic photocatalysis” have been devised. The new materials and new methods can significantly enhance photocatalysis efficiency and overcome many drawbacks associated with the traditional semiconductor photocatalysts. 

This Special Issue aims to provide a platform for scientists and engineers to report the most exciting advances made in this field. We would like to invite colleagues to contribute to this Special Issue. We expect to see amazing studies on semiconductor photocatalysts synthesis, novel methods for photocatalysis enhancement, and novel applications of semiconductor photocatalysts in any form of photocatalytic processes.

Dr. Zhongyu Cai
Prof. Dr. Jia Hong Pan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Semiconductor photocatalysis
  • Plasmonic photocatalysis
  • Photonic photocatalysis
  • Plasmonic materials
  • Photonic materials
  • Pollutant treatment
  • Water splitting
  • Volatile organic compounds remediation
  • Carbon dioxide transformation
  • Solar energy conversion
  • Photovoltaics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Graphene Quantum Dots Doped PVDF(TBT)/PVP(TBT) Fiber Film with Enhanced Photocatalytic Performance
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 596; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10020596 - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
We report the fabrication of polyvinylidene fluoride (tetrabutyl titanate)/polyvinyl pyrrolidone ((tetrabutyl titanate))-graphene quantum dots [PVDF(TBT)/PVP(TBT)-GQDs] film photocatalyst with enhanced photocatalytic performance. The polyvinylidene fluoride (tetrabutyl titanate)/polyvinyl pyrrolidone ((tetrabutyl titanate)) [PVDF(TBT)/PVP(TBT)] film was first prepared with a dual-electrospinning method and then followed by attaching [...] Read more.
We report the fabrication of polyvinylidene fluoride (tetrabutyl titanate)/polyvinyl pyrrolidone ((tetrabutyl titanate))-graphene quantum dots [PVDF(TBT)/PVP(TBT)-GQDs] film photocatalyst with enhanced photocatalytic performance. The polyvinylidene fluoride (tetrabutyl titanate)/polyvinyl pyrrolidone ((tetrabutyl titanate)) [PVDF(TBT)/PVP(TBT)] film was first prepared with a dual-electrospinning method and then followed by attaching graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to the surface of the composite film through a hydrothermal method. Later, part of the PVP in the composite film was dissolved by a hydrothermal method. As a result, a PVDF(TBT)/PVP(TBT)-GQDs film photocatalyst with a larger specific surface area was achieved. The photocatalytic degradation behavior of the PVDF(TBT)/PVP(TBT)-GQDs film photocatalyst was examined by using Rhodamine B as the target contaminant. The PVDF(TBT)/PVP(TBT)-GQDs photocatalyst showed a higher photocatalytic efficiency than PVDF(TBT)-H2O, PVDF(TBT)/PVP(TBT)-H2O, and PVDF(TBT)-GQDs, respectively. The enhanced photocatalytic efficiency can be attributed to the broader optical response range of the PVDF(TBT)/PVP(TBT)-GQDs photocatalyst, which makes it useful as an effective photocatalyst under white light irradiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Semiconductor Photocatalysis)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Recent Advances and Applications of Semiconductor Photocatalytic Technology
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(12), 2489; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9122489 - 18 Jun 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Along with the development of industry and the improvement of people’s living standards, peoples’ demand on resources has greatly increased, causing energy crises and environmental pollution. In recent years, photocatalytic technology has shown great potential as a low-cost, environmentally-friendly, and sustainable technology, and [...] Read more.
Along with the development of industry and the improvement of people’s living standards, peoples’ demand on resources has greatly increased, causing energy crises and environmental pollution. In recent years, photocatalytic technology has shown great potential as a low-cost, environmentally-friendly, and sustainable technology, and it has become a hot research topic. However, current photocatalytic technology cannot meet industrial requirements. The biggest challenge in the industrialization of photocatalyst technology is the development of an ideal photocatalyst, which should possess four features, including a high photocatalytic efficiency, a large specific surface area, a full utilization of sunlight, and recyclability. In this review, starting from the photocatalytic reaction mechanism and the preparation of the photocatalyst, we review the classification of current photocatalysts and the methods for improving photocatalytic performance; we also further discuss the potential industrial usage of photocatalytic technology. This review also aims to provide basic and comprehensive information on the industrialization of photocatalysis technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Semiconductor Photocatalysis)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Photocatalytic Lithography
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(7), 1266; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9071266 - 27 Mar 2019
Abstract
Patterning, the controlled formation of ordered surface features with different physico-chemical properties, is a cornerstone of contemporary micro- and nanofabrication. In this context, lithographic approaches owe their wide success to their versatility and their relative ease of implementation and scalability. Conventional photolithographic methods [...] Read more.
Patterning, the controlled formation of ordered surface features with different physico-chemical properties, is a cornerstone of contemporary micro- and nanofabrication. In this context, lithographic approaches owe their wide success to their versatility and their relative ease of implementation and scalability. Conventional photolithographic methods require several steps and the use of polymeric photoresists for the development of the desired pattern, all factors which can be deleterious, especially for sensitive substrates. Efficient patterning of surfaces, with resolution down to the nanometer scale, can be achieved by means of photocatalytic lithography. This approach is based on the use of photocatalysts to achieve the selective chemical modification or degradation of self-assembled monolayers, polymers, and metals. A wide range of photoactive compounds, from semiconducting oxides to porphyrins, have been demonstrated to be suitable photocatalysts. The goal of the present review is to provide a comprehensive state-of-the-art photocatalytic lithography, ranging from approaches based on semiconducting oxides to singlet oxygen-based lithography. Special attention will be dedicated to the results obtained for the patterning of polymer brushes, the sculpturing of metal nanoparticle arrays, and the patterning of graphene-based structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Semiconductor Photocatalysis)
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