Processing, Manufacturing and Machining of Advanced Alloy Materials: Latest Advances and Prospects

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2024 | Viewed by 669

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Production Engeneering, Lublin University of Technology, 20-618 Lublin, Poland
Interests: magnesium alloys; milling; machinability indicators; machining
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Guest Editor
Department of Production Engineering, Lublin University of Technology, 20-618 Lublin, Poland
Interests: surface roughness; surface topography; vibratory shot peening; finishing treatment; burnishing; microhardness

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics, Rzeszow University of Technology, 12 Powstancow Warszawy Str., 35-959 Rzeszow, Poland
Interests: milling; turning, difficult-to-cut materials; sustainable machining; CNC programming; machining process optimization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced Alloy Materials include both titanium, nickel and chromium alloys, as well as light alloys, including aluminum and magnesium alloys. Each material group finds different applications in various industries. For example, titanium or nickel alloys are used for components such as aircraft engine elements. On the other hand, light alloys (e.g., magnesium alloys) characterized by insignificant weight and considerable strength, find increasingly wider applications as weight-saving elements. In the case of magnesium alloys, properties such as excellent electromagnetic shielding, advantageous casting properties, good machinability, the ability to damp vibrations, recyclability and accessibility are considered beneficial.

Starting from the 1970s, attempts have been made to define recommended machinability parameters for different alloys, including difficult-to-machine materials and lights alloys. Problems occurring in the manufacturing and machining of various groups of materials may have various causes. For example, the problems occurring in the milling of magnesium alloys can be classified depending on the type of machining (i.e., dry, wet or with oil). In dry machining, the critical machinability indicator is the temperature in the cutting zone. However, magnesium alloys have proven to be suitable for both rough, finish and precision machining.

For the above reasons, it seems advisable to collect the most important information about “Processing, Manufacturing and Machining of Advanced Alloy Materials: Latest Advances and Prospects”.

Dr. Ireneusz Zagórski
Dr. Agnieszka Skoczylas
Prof. Dr. Witold Habrat
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • machinability
  • aviation alloys
  • difficult-to-machine materials
  • light alloys
  • machinability indicators
  • surface roughness
  • cutting forces
  • vibrations
  • temperature in the cutting area
  • structure after processing
  • microhardness

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

19 pages, 8939 KiB  
Article
Process Stability Analysis during Trochoidal Milling of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy Using Different Toolholder Types
by Jarosław Korpysa, Ireneusz Zagórski, Andrzej Weremczuk and Witold Habrat
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(9), 3616; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14093616 - 24 Apr 2024
Viewed by 473
Abstract
Trochoidal milling is one of the solutions for increasing the efficiency of machining processes. A decreased cutting tool’s arc of contact leads to a reduction in the generated cutting forces, thus improving process stability. Vibration is an inherent part of any machining process, [...] Read more.
Trochoidal milling is one of the solutions for increasing the efficiency of machining processes. A decreased cutting tool’s arc of contact leads to a reduction in the generated cutting forces, thus improving process stability. Vibration is an inherent part of any machining process, affecting the accuracy and quality of the manufactured components, but it can also pose a danger to machine operators. Chatter is particularly detrimental, leaving characteristic marks on shaped surfaces and potentially leading to catastrophic tool damage. Therefore, it is important to ensure the stability of machining and also reduce vibration. The primary purpose of the conducted research is to evaluate the stability of the milling process of the AZ91D magnesium alloy performed through a trochoidal strategy. An additional objective is to establish the effect of the variation in machining parameters and toolholder types on milling stability. Three types of toolholders most commonly used in industry are used in the study. The basis of the investigation is the measurement of vibration displacement and acceleration analysed in the time domain. A spectral analysis of the signals is also performed based on Fast Fourier Transform, to identify signal components and detect the susceptibility to chatter occurrence. An important part of the study is also an attempt to use the Composite Multiscale Entropy as an indicator to determine the stability of the machining processes. Entropy does not exceed the values of 1.5 for cutting speed and 2.5 for feed per tooth, respectively. Vibration acceleration does not exceed (in most cases) the value of 20 m/s2 for the peak-to-peak parameter and the shrinkfit toolholder. For vibration displacement (peak-to-peak parameter), there are oscillations around the value of 0.9 mm for all kinds of toolholders. Full article
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