Special Issue "Polymeric Adhesives for Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ji Hyun Ryu
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Carbon Convergence Engineering, College of Engineering, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Chunbuk 54538, Korea
Interests: biomaterials; adhesives; hydrogels; hemostat; drug delivery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polymeric biomaterials have been extensively developed for various biomedical applications such as drug delivery and tissue engineering due to their ability to interact with biological systems. However, it has been difficult to attach the biomaterials on the target tissue surfaces due to a large amount of water in our bodies. Over the past several decades, there have been numerous attempts to develop adhesive polymer-based biomaterials that instantly adhere to the target tissue. For instance, the conjugation or incorporation of adhesive moieties into polymeric biomaterials exhibits excellent tissue adhesive properties without affecting their intrinsic properties. Thus, polymeric adhesives have an enormous potential to enhance the therapeutic effects of various medical treatments.

This Special Issue of Applied Sciences, entitled ‘’Polymeric Adhesives for Biomedical Applications’’, will overview recent progress in the development of adhesive polymeric biomaterials with a broad range of design strategies, syntheses, preparations, structures, characteristics, mechanisms, and applications in biomedical fields. Original research articles, reviews, and perspective articles are welcome.

Dr. Ji Hyun Ryu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Adhesive polymer
  • Adhesive hydrogel/film/particle/fiber
  • Tissue/cell adhesive
  • Mucoadhesive
  • Sealant
  • Medical glue
  • Fibrin glue
  • Polyacrylic acid
  • Polyphenol
  • Polyurethane
  • Catechol
  • Thiol

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Particle Orientation and Porosity on Thermal Conductivity of Petroleum Pitch Polymer-Based Carbon Molded Body
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(20), 7281; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10207281 - 17 Oct 2020
Abstract
The present study was conducted to investigate changes in the thermal conductivity of petroleum pitch-based carbon molded bodies prepared by anisotropic (uniaxial) molding under different molding pressures. The carbon molded bodies were prepared using needle coke and petroleum-based binder pitch polymers (softening point: [...] Read more.
The present study was conducted to investigate changes in the thermal conductivity of petroleum pitch-based carbon molded bodies prepared by anisotropic (uniaxial) molding under different molding pressures. The carbon molded bodies were prepared using needle coke and petroleum-based binder pitch polymers (softening point: 150 ℃). Green blocks prepared under high molding pressure showed a higher particle orientation value up to 16.4 μm. Graphite blocks, prepared by graphitizing the green blocks at 2800 ℃ showed a similar trend. The pores in the carbon molded body were filled with low boiling point substances, generated by the thermal treatment of the binder pitch polymer or air that could not be discharged during the molding procedure. Therefore, when phonons encountered a pore, phonon scattering, rather than phonon transport, occurred, and thus the heat transport from the hot zone to a cold zone became slow. As a result, although the particle orientation was a little higher in the B_10-G sample than in the B_20-G sample (in the error range), the thermal conductivity was higher in the B_20-G sample, which may be because the B_10-G sample had a higher porosity than the B_20-G sample. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Adhesives for Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
The Control of Volume Expansion and Porosity in Carbon Block by Carbon Black (CB) Addition for Increasing Thermal Conductivity
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(17), 6068; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10176068 - 01 Sep 2020
Abstract
The graphite block as a phase change materials (PCMs) was manufactured by graphitization of a carbon block. Carbon blocks were prepared by filler (cokes or graphite) and binder (pitch). The binder-coated filler was thermally treated for carbonization. The gases generated from the evaporation [...] Read more.
The graphite block as a phase change materials (PCMs) was manufactured by graphitization of a carbon block. Carbon blocks were prepared by filler (cokes or graphite) and binder (pitch). The binder-coated filler was thermally treated for carbonization. The gases generated from the evaporation of low molecular weight components in the binder pitch during the carbonization process were not released to the outside. Consequently, porosity and volume expansion were increased in artificial graphite, and thereby the thermal conductivity decreased. In this study, to prevent the decrease of thermal conductivity in the artificial graphite due to the disadvantages of binder pitch, the carbon block was prepared by the addition of carbon black, which can absorb low molecular weight compounds and release the generated gas. The properties of the prepared carbon blocks were analyzed by SEM, TGA, and thermal conductivity. The addition of carbon black (CB) decreased the porosity and volume expansion of the carbon blocks by 38.3% and 65.9%, respectively, and increased the thermal conductivity by 57.1%. The CB absorbed the low molecular weight compounds of binder pitch and induced the release of generated gases during the carbonization process to decrease porosity, and the thermal conductivity of the carbon block increased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Adhesives for Biomedical Applications)
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