Special Issue "Advances in Industrial Waste Reduction"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Industrial Technologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Constantinos S. Psomopoulos
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Guest Editor
High Voltage and Energy Systems Research Lab, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of West Attica, GR-122 44, Egaleo, Greece
Interests: high voltage engineering; critical energy infrastructure protection; energy efficiency; resource efficiency; sustainability; eco-design; energy systems asset management
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Prof. Athanasios Kungolos
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Guest Editor
School of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 
Thessaloniki, Greece
Prof. Dr. Armando Di Nardo
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Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Università degli Studi della Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, via Roma 29, Aversa, 81031, Italy
Interests: Water network management; Water network partitioning; Water leakage; Complex network theory; Critical infrastructure; Optimization; Smart water network; Resilience
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Industry is an integral part of the economic activity of any country. It may be divided mainly into primary and secondary, where there is also the tertiary sector focusing on services and intellectual services industry. The primary sector is concerned with the extraction of raw materials. It includes fishing, farming, forestry, minerals extraction, and mining. These activities produce large amounts of waste, with a high environmental impact. Their impact also depends on the economic status of the country in which the infrastructures are operating. The secondary sector of the economy includes industries that produce a finished, usable product, or are involved in construction. This sector, generally, takes the output of the primary sector and manufactures finished goods that are suitable for use by other businesses, for export, or sale to domestic consumers. This sector is often divided into light and heavy industry. Many of these industries consume large quantities of energy, and require factories and machinery to convert raw materials into goods and products. They also produce waste materials and waste heat that may cause environmental problems or pollution. The secondary sector supports both the primary and tertiary sector.

Industrial wastes are produced by industrial activity, which includes any material that is rendered useless during a manufacturing process, such as that of factories, industries, mills, and mining operations. Types of industrial waste include dirt and gravel, masonry and concrete, scrap metal, oil, solvents, chemicals, scrap lumber, and even vegetable matter from restaurants. Industrial waste may be solid, liquid, or gaseous. It may be hazardous or non-hazardous waste. Hazardous waste may be toxic, ignitable, corrosive, reactive, or radioactive. Industrial waste may pollute the air, soil, or nearby water sources, eventually ending up in the sea. Industrial waste is often mixed into municipal waste, making accurate assessments difficult. An estimate for the United States reaches as high as 7.6 billion tons of industrial waste produced every year. Most countries have enacted legislation to deal with the problem of industrial waste, but strictness and compliance regimes vary. Enforcement is always an issue. Industrial wastes are growing in numbers as the industry expands and new horizons are created. Thus, nowadays, industrial waste management is one of the key issues for reaching sustainable development and a circular economy. They have a tremendous impact on the environment, and their proper management is of paramount importance for preserving the environment. Thus, their impact on climate change is very high.

Science and engineering have spent millions of hours on investigating the methods for improving waste management methods and mitigating their impact on the environment. Thousands of papers have proven the importance of proper industrial waste management and recycling towards protecting the environment and reducing the impact of climate change, providing the benefits of established and innovative methods. This Special Issue is focused on presenting new views and approaches for established methods, as well as presenting new breakthrough approaches in waste management towards a circular economy and a sustainable production/consumption approach. Under this context, the management and reduction of industrial waste must be examined under the United Nations’ Sustainability Goals and the circular economy. Thus, their impact on the economy and society are also important, and this Special Issue will welcome such manuscripts. The scope and the goal of this Special Issue is to investigate, in addition to the core issues of advanced industrial waste management technologies, the alternative approaches arising towards their reduction through sustainable, life-cycle, circularity, and waste as resource approaches towards their reduction and minimisation. With reference to the water, the Special Issue is focused both on the problem of water contamination and on water waste. Societal and economic challenges are an extremely important parameter that affects decision making and technological solutions selection, so their role in achieving sustainability for industrial waste management is crucial. Stakeholders, technology experts, and decision makers have to prove their choices, going beyond the obvious benefits addressed by technology, as the local and regional communities are the ones that fight against one or another technology, and present the NIMBY phenomenon. Thus, submissions related to these aspects, as well as case studies, are more than welcome in this Special Issue.

Prof. Constantinos S. Psomopoulos
Prof. Athanasios Kungolos
Prof. Armando Di Nardo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Waste from the raw materials industry
  • Waste from the manufacturing and construction industry
  • Industrial waste as a resource
  • Industrial water waste management
  • Solid, liquid, and gaseous industrial waste
  • Hazardous and non-hazardous industrial waste
  • Industrial waste generation and reduction
  • Environmental, economic, and societal aspects of industrial waste management
  • Advanced techniques for industrial waste management
  • LCA, environmental impact, and sustainable approaches in industrial waste management
  • Industrial waste under the UN’s Sustainability Goals and circular economy
  • Risk analysis and vulnerability of industrial waste management industry and supply chain
  • Legislation and prevention for industrial waste
  • WEEE and industrial waste

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Circular Economy in Mexico’s Electronic and Cell Phone Industry: Recent Evidence of Consumer Behavior
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(21), 7744; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217744 - 02 Nov 2020
Abstract
Circular Economy (CE) models are increasingly referenced in international fora and on many countries’ climate action agendas. This emphasis is associated with the international environmental and climate crisis. The case of the electronics industry remains particularly relevant, given its background in the use [...] Read more.
Circular Economy (CE) models are increasingly referenced in international fora and on many countries’ climate action agendas. This emphasis is associated with the international environmental and climate crisis. The case of the electronics industry remains particularly relevant, given its background in the use of CE models and its potential to enhance their use. This work focuses on consumer behavior regarding electronics products in Mexico. This is a largely under-researched topic not only in Mexico but also in Latin America. This study demonstrates that, by trying to extend the lifespan of their electronic products, consumers have awareness of product circularity. However, there is a lack of incentives to capitalize on this consumer interest, compounded by the limited participation of manufacturers and distributors. It is concluded that with a well-designed public policy, the electronics industry (including the mobile phone sector) in Mexico can move toward a CE model more rapidly. A stronger initiative for CE by design should be part of these policies, not only in Mexico but also internationally. The role of better eco-labelling in promoting consumers’ environmental awareness is essential. The lessons of this case study might be of interest to other countries as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Industrial Waste Reduction)
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Open AccessArticle
A Mathematical Model for Reduction of Trim Loss in Cutting Reels at a Make-to-Order Paper Mill
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(15), 5274; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10155274 - 30 Jul 2020
Abstract
One of the main issues in a paper mill is the minimization of trim loss when cutting master reels and stocked reels into reels of smaller required widths. The losses produced in trimming at a paper mill are reprocessed by using different chemicals [...] Read more.
One of the main issues in a paper mill is the minimization of trim loss when cutting master reels and stocked reels into reels of smaller required widths. The losses produced in trimming at a paper mill are reprocessed by using different chemicals which contributes to significant discharge of effluent to surface water and causes environmental damage. This paper presents a real-world industrial problem of production planning and cutting optimization of reels at a paper mill and differs from other cutting stock problems by considering production and cutting of master reels of flexible widths and cutting already stocked over-produced and useable leftover reels of smaller widths. The cutting process of reels is performed with a limited number of cutting knives at the winder. The problem is formulated as a linear programming model where the generation of all feasible cutting patterns determines the columns of the constraint matrix. The model is solved optimally using simplex algorithm with the objective of trim loss minimization while satisfying a set of constraints. The solution obtained is rounded in a post-optimization procedure in order to satisfy integer constraints. When tested on data from the paper mill, the results of the proposed model showed a significant reduction in trim loss and outperformed traditional exact approaches. The cutting optimization resulted in minimum losses in paper trimming and a lesser amount of paper is reprocessed to make new reels which reduced the discharge of effluent to the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Industrial Waste Reduction)
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Open AccessArticle
An Empirical Study on Greenhouse Gas Emission Calculations Under Different Municipal Solid Waste Management Strategies
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(5), 1673; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10051673 - 02 Mar 2020
Abstract
The Chinese government is committed to ensuring separation of municipal solid waste (MSW), promoting the integrated development of the MSW management system with the renewable resource recovery system, and achieving construction of ecological civilization. Guided by the methods in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate [...] Read more.
The Chinese government is committed to ensuring separation of municipal solid waste (MSW), promoting the integrated development of the MSW management system with the renewable resource recovery system, and achieving construction of ecological civilization. Guided by the methods in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions under five waste disposal scenarios in Beijing under the life cycle framework were assessed in this research. The study included collection and transportation, as well as three end disposal methods (sanitary landfill, incineration, and composting), and the emission reduction benefits of electricity generation from incineration and recycling of renewable resources were taken into account. The results show that an emission reduction benefit of 70.82% could be achieved under Scenario 5 in which kitchen waste and recyclables are sorted and recycled and the residue is incinerated, and the selection of the optimal strategy was not affected by changes in the separation rate. In addition, landfill would emit more GHG than incineration and composting. The results of this study are helpful for the government to make a decision on MSW management considering the goal of GHG emission reduction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Industrial Waste Reduction)
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