Special Issue "Eco-Novel Food and Feed"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Isabel Maria Nunes De Sousa
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Guest Editor
LEAF – Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: Characterization of the structure of food materials using Rheology and Texture complemented with microscopy. Food product development. Functional foods and new sustainable sources of food. Foods for special groups e.g. celiacs and diabetics or special diets (low calories, high protein, etc.). Design of food products to Industry, focused on nutritional and health claims, using under exploited food materials including food industry by-products within a bioeconomy reasoning
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Prof. Dr. Anabela Raymundo
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Guest Editor
LEAF – Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: food rheology; 3D food printing; food design and sustainable product development; gluten-free cereal-based foods
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Dr. María Dolores Torres
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Science Faculty (Campus Ourense), Universidade de Vigo, As Lagoas, 32004 Ourense, Spain
Interests: food rheology; functional foodstuffs; gluten-free matrices; food product innovation with food by-products
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

You are cordially invited to contribute to this Special Issue entitled “Eco-Novel Food and Feed”—a daring and trendy subject.

As we well know, innovation is recognized as the key driver of economic growth. Trends in the food industry deal with a permanent need to develop new food products, adjusted to the consumer demands and, in the near future, to scarcity of food resources. Concepts of sustainable food production and food products as health and wellness promoters, the use of alternative ingredients such as new protein sources, or the use of by-products in designed thought food or feed formulations according to bioeconomic principles, are current topics that act as driving forces for innovation. Currently, food or feed product development methodologies are generally based on the chemical and nutritional properties, complemented with a sensory validation, carried out in the final stages of the development process. In addition, the structure of food has proved to be a determinant for the food’s appeal, and strongly impacts consumers’ acceptance. It is well-known that products with the same chemical composition can present very different structures, resulting in differently perceived texture and sensory properties. In the creative process, the food macromolecules (proteins and polysaccharides) are the major players for the creation of relevant food structures such as foams, emulsions, and gels. The development of gluten-free or vegetarian products by using alternative proteins and polysaccharides, as well as the use of food industry by-products as sources of these structuring biopolymers, along with the structural implications of adding protein and/or fiber-rich healthy ingredients (e.g., macro or microalgae, psyllium) are some of the challenges in creating novel food or feed products. Sustainability in the production of the food ingredients and the economic viability of their production and subsequent transformation into well-accepted commercial food products are essential for the progress of the industry, with a relevant impact on the economy. Finally, the consumer attitude towards new food products is a relevant issue for the success of the novelties, and should be considered for close-to-market novel products.

These are some of the current topics, but you are welcome to add new ones and contribute to this highly impactful Special Issue.

Assoc. Prof. Isabel Maria Nunes de Sousa
Prof. Dr. Anabela Raymundo
Dr. María Dolores Torres Pérez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • innovation
  • food/feed product development
  • design thinking in food/feed formulations
  • sustainability of food/feed
  • food/feed as health and wellness promoters
  • food for groups with special requirements
  • food structure
  • sustainability and economic viability
  • re-introduction of by-products into the food value chain
  • consumer acceptance and attitude
  • market feasibility

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Special Issue: Eco-Novel Food and Feed
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(13), 4641; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10134641 - 05 Jul 2020
Abstract
Tendencies in food and feed industries deal with a permanent need to develop innovative products, tailored to consumer demands and, in the near future, to scarcity of food resources. Sustainable food production and food products as health and wellness promoters, and the use [...] Read more.
Tendencies in food and feed industries deal with a permanent need to develop innovative products, tailored to consumer demands and, in the near future, to scarcity of food resources. Sustainable food production and food products as health and wellness promoters, and the use of alternative ingredients or by-products in designed thought food or feed formulations following circular economy principles, are hot topics that act as driving forces for innovation. This special issue offers a comprehensive forum for exchanging novel research ideas or empirical practices covering discussions from healthy foodstuffs enriched with functional ingredients, with special emphasis on those targets for populations with specific requirements, to consumer attitudes towards new ingredients and end products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Novel Food and Feed)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Psyllium and Laminaria Partnership—An Overview of Possible Food Gel Applications
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(20), 4356; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9204356 - 16 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Seaweeds are a novel source of important nutritional compounds with interesting biological activities that could be processed into added-value products. In this study, two previously developed products obtained by Laminaria ochroleuca processing (liquid extract and a purée-like mixture) were processed with Psyllium gel [...] Read more.
Seaweeds are a novel source of important nutritional compounds with interesting biological activities that could be processed into added-value products. In this study, two previously developed products obtained by Laminaria ochroleuca processing (liquid extract and a purée-like mixture) were processed with Psyllium gel to develop functional hydrogels. The optimization of the formulation and the characterization of the Laminaria-Psyllium gels in terms of their mechanical features have allowed the proposal of potential food applications. A beneficial interaction was found between Laminaria and Psyllium in terms of the reinforcement of texture and rheological properties. The obtained outcomes could provide new healthy gelling formulations with attractive properties to alleviate the growing market demand of eco-novel food matrices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Novel Food and Feed)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Wheat Bread with Dairy Products—Technology, Nutritional, and Sensory Properties
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(19), 4101; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9194101 - 01 Oct 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
As the relation between diet and health became a priority for the consumers, the development of healthy foods enriched with functional ingredients increased substantially. Dairy products represent an alternative for new products and can be used to enhance the functional and nutritional value [...] Read more.
As the relation between diet and health became a priority for the consumers, the development of healthy foods enriched with functional ingredients increased substantially. Dairy products represent an alternative for new products and can be used to enhance the functional and nutritional value of bakery products. The addition of yoghurt and curd cheese to wheat bread was studied, and the impact on the dough rheology, microstructure, bread quality, and sensory properties were evaluated. Dairy product additions from 10 to 50 g and higher levels up to 70 g of yoghurt and 83 g of curd cheese were tested. Replacements were performed on wheat flour basis and water absorption. It was observed that the yoghurt additions had a positive impact on the rheology characteristics of the dough. For curd cheese additions, the best dough evaluated on extension was the 30 g of wheat flour formulation. In both cases, the microstructure analysis supported the results obtained for doughs and breads. These breads showed a significant improvement on nutrition profile, which is important to balance the daily diet in terms of major and trace minerals and is important for health-enhancing and maintenance. Good sensorial acceptability for breads with 50 g of yoghurt and 30 g of curd cheese was obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Novel Food and Feed)
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Open AccessArticle
A Novel Way for Whey: Cheese Whey Fermentation Produces an Effective and Environmentally-Safe Alternative to Chlorine
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(14), 2800; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9142800 - 12 Jul 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Cheese whey has been described as an environmental hazard due to its high organic content. Although it has been suggested that whey can be used as food disinfectant, it continues to pose an environmental problem because it still contains a high organic load. [...] Read more.
Cheese whey has been described as an environmental hazard due to its high organic content. Although it has been suggested that whey can be used as food disinfectant, it continues to pose an environmental problem because it still contains a high organic load. Here, we aimed to develop a low-cost, scalable fermentation protocol to produce a disinfectant from dairy waste that has very little organic content and high levels of lactic acid. Fermentation was achieved with industrial whey from ewe, goat, and cow’s milk, using a specific mesophilic-lactic acid bacteria starter mix over 120 h, which yielded the highest lactic acid production and the lowest lactose content. Antibacterial activity was observed against Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli O157:H7, plus a total of thirteen other food pathogenic and spoilage strains, and antibacterial activities were determined to be highest after 120 h. We further validated this whey’s application as a disinfectant in shredded lettuce and compared its efficacy to that of chlorine, evaluating microbial quality, texture, color, and sensory perception, pH, and O2 and CO2 determinations. Results showed that not only was microbial quality better when using our whey solution (p < 0.05), but also the quality indicators for whey were statistically similar to those treated with chlorine. Hence, our work validates the use of an industrial waste whey as a low-cost, efficient, and environmentally safe disinfectant, with potential applications for minimally processed foodstuffs as an alternative to chlorine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Novel Food and Feed)
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Open AccessArticle
Increased Anti-Inflammatory Effects on LPS-Induced Microglia Cells by Spirulina maxima Extract from Ultrasonic Process
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(10), 2144; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9102144 - 26 May 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
The Spirulina maxima exact from a non-thermal ultrasonic process (UE) contains 17.5 mg/g of total chlorophyll, compared to 6.24 mg/g of chlorophyll derived from the conventional 70% ethanol extraction at 80 °C for 12 h (EE). The UE also showed relatively low cytotoxicity [...] Read more.
The Spirulina maxima exact from a non-thermal ultrasonic process (UE) contains 17.5 mg/g of total chlorophyll, compared to 6.24 mg/g of chlorophyll derived from the conventional 70% ethanol extraction at 80 °C for 12 h (EE). The UE also showed relatively low cytotoxicity against murine microglial cells (BV-2) and inhibited the production of the inflammatory mediators, NO and PGE2. The UE also effectively suppresses both mRNA expression and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, in a concentration-dependent manner. Notably, TNF-α gene and protein production were most strongly down-regulated, while IL-6 was the least affected by all ranges of treatment concentrations. This work first demonstrated a quantitative correlation between mRNA expression and the production of cytokines, showing that suppression of TNF-α gene expression was most significantly correlated with its secretion. These results clearly proved that the anti-inflammatory effects of Spirulina extract from a nonthermal ultrasonic process, which yielded high concentrations of intact forms of chlorophylls, were increased two-fold compared to those of conventional extracts processed at high temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Novel Food and Feed)
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Open AccessArticle
Antihypertensive Peptide Activity in Dutch-Type Cheese Models Prepared with Different Additional Strains of Lactobacillus Genus Bacteria
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(8), 1674; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9081674 - 23 Apr 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the proteolytic activity of bacterial strains from the genus Lactobacillus and their capability in producing peptide inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in cheese models prepared with their addition. After 5 weeks of ripening, all cheese [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to determine the proteolytic activity of bacterial strains from the genus Lactobacillus and their capability in producing peptide inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in cheese models prepared with their addition. After 5 weeks of ripening, all cheese models studied were characterized by a high ability of angiotensin convertase inhibition which exceeded 80%. The use of the adjunct bacterial cultures from the genus Lactobacillus contributed to lower IC50 values compared with the value determined for the control cheese model. The proteolytic activity of model cheeses varied in their increase through the period of ripening, with changes in values dependent on the adjunct lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strain used for cheesemaking. Starting from the first week of ripening, the lowest proteolytic activity was demonstrated for the control cheese models, whereas the highest activity throughout the ripening period was shown for the cheese models with the addition of Lb. rhamnosus 489. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Novel Food and Feed)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Food Neophobia or Distrust of Novelties? Exploring Consumers’ Attitudes toward GMOs, Insects and Cultured Meat
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(20), 4440; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9204440 - 19 Oct 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The food industry is constantly challenged to find new ideas to satisfy the increasingly specific consumer demand. However, innovative food products do not always become part of consumption habits or create a market. One of the major sources of resistance to novelty lies [...] Read more.
The food industry is constantly challenged to find new ideas to satisfy the increasingly specific consumer demand. However, innovative food products do not always become part of consumption habits or create a market. One of the major sources of resistance to novelty lies in the attitude of the consumer, who in many cases may be suspicious or hostile as a result of specific ideologies, overly attached to tradition, or affected by neophobia. This paper analyzes the construct of food neophobia (the “unwillingness to try new foods”) in its phenomenology and its actual power to explain hostility to innovation in the agri-food sector. The limits of the concept, which is not always sufficient to shed light on the many reasons that could underlie the rejection of certain foods, will also be discussed. In addition, we review the recent literature on Europeans’ attitude toward novel foods and innovation including Genetically modified organisms (GMOs), cultivated meat and insects as food. This literature reveals a number of paradoxes in consumers’ behavior, and in the many complex conditions underpinning the success of innovation in food production. These conditions can only be understood by reconstructing the meanings consumers assign to food, and are often embedded in larger social and political frameworks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Novel Food and Feed)

Other

Open AccessBrief Report
Increased Grain Amino Acid Content in Rice with Earthworm Castings
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(6), 1090; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9061090 - 15 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Enhancing the nutritional value of rice can improve the health of rice consumers. Grain amino acid content is an important nutritional component. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the application of earthworm castings could increase the grain amino acid content [...] Read more.
Enhancing the nutritional value of rice can improve the health of rice consumers. Grain amino acid content is an important nutritional component. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the application of earthworm castings could increase the grain amino acid content in rice. Results showed that total amino acid content in the grain of rice was significantly elevated by applying earthworm castings (17 kg m−2), with an average increase of 8% across four tested rice cultivars. Application of earthworm castings had no significant effect on total nitrogen (N) content but significantly increased the ratio of amino acid to N (total amino acid content/total N content) in rice grains. The results of the present study suggest that application of earthworm castings can increase grain amino acid content in rice by improving the efficiency of the N to amino acid conversion, and highlight that further studies are required to assess the effects of earthworm castings on the amino acid metabolism in rice grains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Novel Food and Feed)
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