Special Issue "Brillouin Scattering and Optomechanics"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jean-Charles Beugnot
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut FEMTO-ST, Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, CNRS, 25000 Besançon, France
Interests: brillouin light scattering in optical fibers; optoacoustics; optical fiber tapers; optical fiber sensor
Dr. Vincent Laude
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut FEMTO-ST, Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, CNRS, 25000 Besançon, France
Interests: brillouin light scattering in optical fibers and microwires; optomechanical structures; acousto-optics; opto-acoustics; phononic crystals; acoustic metamaterials; phoxonic crystals; surface acoustic waves
Dr. Thibaut Sylvestre
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut FEMTO-ST, Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, CNRS, 25000 Besançon, France
Interests: brillouin light scattering; optomechanics; optoacoustics; nonlinear optics; fiber optics; photonic crystal fibers; fiber tapers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The science of the interaction of sound and light, including acousto-optics, has recently witnessed the emergence of new topics and directions that lead to novel fundamental effects and applications. Optomechanical structures, including phoxonic crystals—also known as simultaneous photonic and phononic crystals—are presently being investigated in order to obtain very efficient interactions in tiny volumes. They allow for the control of phonons with photons, but also for ultimate sensing applications. Concurrently, opto-acoustical interactions in micro- and nanoscale optical resonantors, fibers, and waveguides are being seen in a new light thanks to new materials and structures, leading to a renewed view of Brillouin scattering.

This Special Issue of the journal Applied Sciences “Brillouin Scattering and Optomechanics” aims to cover recent advances in the science of the interaction of light and sound, including theoretical and experimental contributions.

Dr. Jean-Charles Beugnot
Dr. Vincent Laude
Dr. Thibaut Sylvestre
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optomechanics and optomechanical structures

  • Phoxonics (simultaneous photonic and phononic crystals and structures)

  • Brillouin light scattering in optical fibers, wires, and waveguides

  • Theory of the interaction of photons and phonons

  • Coherent generation of ultrasound by light

  • Interactions of ultrasound with optical/electromagnetic waves

  • Acousto-optics at the micro- and nanoscale

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Special Issue on Brillouin Scattering and Optomechanics
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(18), 3745; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9183745 - 08 Sep 2019
Viewed by 577
Abstract
The science of the interaction of sound and light, including acousto-optics and opto-acoustics, has recently witnessed the emergence of new topics and directions that lead to a renewed understanding of fundamental effects and to novel applications [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brillouin Scattering and Optomechanics)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Article
Spontaneous Brillouin Scattering Spectrum and Coherent Brillouin Gain in Optical Fibers
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(6), 907; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8060907 - 01 Jun 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1394
Abstract
Brillouin light scattering describes the diffraction of light waves by acoustic phonons, originating from random thermal fluctuations inside a transparent body, or by coherent acoustic waves, generated by a transducer or from the interference of two frequency-detuned optical waves. In experiments with optical [...] Read more.
Brillouin light scattering describes the diffraction of light waves by acoustic phonons, originating from random thermal fluctuations inside a transparent body, or by coherent acoustic waves, generated by a transducer or from the interference of two frequency-detuned optical waves. In experiments with optical fibers, it is generally found that the spontaneous Brillouin spectrum has the same frequency dependence as the coherent Brillouin gain. We examine the origin of this similarity between apparently different physical situations. We specifically solve the elastodynamic equation, giving displacements inside the body, under a stochastic Langevin excitation and in response to a coherent optical force. It is emphasized that phase matching is responsible for temporal and spatial frequency-domain filtering of the excitation, leading in either case to the excitation of a Lorentzian frequency response solely determined by elastic loss. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brillouin Scattering and Optomechanics)
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Article
Propagation of Elastic Waves in a One-Dimensional High Aspect Ratio Nanoridge Phononic Crystal
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(5), 805; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8050805 - 17 May 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1730
Abstract
We investigate the propagation of elastic waves in a one-dimensional (1D) phononic crystal constituted by high aspect ratio epoxy nanoridges that have been deposited at the surface of a glass substrate. With the help of the finite element method (FEM), we calculate the [...] Read more.
We investigate the propagation of elastic waves in a one-dimensional (1D) phononic crystal constituted by high aspect ratio epoxy nanoridges that have been deposited at the surface of a glass substrate. With the help of the finite element method (FEM), we calculate the dispersion curves of the modes localized at the surface for propagation both parallel and perpendicular to the nanoridges. When the direction of the wave is parallel to the nanoridges, we find that the vibrational states coincide with the Lamb modes of an infinite plate that correspond to one nanoridge. When the direction of wave propagation is perpendicular to the 1D nanoridges, the localized modes inside the nanoridges give rise to flat branches in the band structure that interact with the surface Rayleigh mode, and possibly open narrow band gaps. Filling the nanoridge structure with a viscous liquid produces new modes that propagate along the 1D finite height multilayer array. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brillouin Scattering and Optomechanics)
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Article
Inducing Strong Non-Linearities in a Phonon Trapping Quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator Coupled to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 602; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8040602 - 11 Apr 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1516
Abstract
A quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave resonator is designed to coherently trap phonons in such a way that they are well confined and immune to suspension losses so they exhibit extremely high acoustic Q-factors at low temperature, with Q × f products of [...] Read more.
A quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave resonator is designed to coherently trap phonons in such a way that they are well confined and immune to suspension losses so they exhibit extremely high acoustic Q-factors at low temperature, with Q × f products of order 10 18 Hz. In this work we couple such a resonator to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) amplifier and investigate effects in the strong signal regime. Both parallel and series connection topologies of the system are investigated. The study reveals significant non-Duffing response that is associated with the nonlinear characteristics of Josephson junctions. The nonlinearity provides quasi-periodic structure of the spectrum in both incident power and frequency. The result gives an insight into the open loop behaviour of a future Cryogenic Quartz Oscillator in the strong signal regime. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brillouin Scattering and Optomechanics)
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Article
A Topological View on Optical and Phononic Fabry–Perot Microcavities through the Su–Schrieffer–Heeger Model
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 527; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8040527 - 30 Mar 2018
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2493
Abstract
Advances in nanofabrication technologies have enabled the study of acoustic wave phenomena in the technologically relevant GHz–THz range. First steps towards applying concepts from topology in nanophononics were made with the proposal of a new topological acoustic resonator, based on the concept of [...] Read more.
Advances in nanofabrication technologies have enabled the study of acoustic wave phenomena in the technologically relevant GHz–THz range. First steps towards applying concepts from topology in nanophononics were made with the proposal of a new topological acoustic resonator, based on the concept of band inversion. In topology, the Su–Schrieffer–Heeger (SSH) model is the paradigm that accounts for the topological properties of many one-dimensional structures. Both the classical Fabry–Perot resonator and the reported topological resonators are based on Distributed Bragg Reflectors (DBRs). A clear and detailed relation between the two systems, however, is still lacking. Here, we show how a parallelism between the standard DBR-based acoustic Fabry–Perot type cavity and the SSH model of polyacetylene can be established. We discuss the existence of surface modes in acoustic DBRs and interface modes in concatenated DBRs and show that these modes are equivalent to Fabry–Perot type cavity modes. Although it is not possible to assign topological invariants to both acoustic bands enclosing the considered minigap in the nanophononic Fabry–Perot case, the existence of the confined mode in a Fabry–Perot cavity can nevertheless be interpreted in terms of the symmetry inversion of the Bloch modes at the Brillouin zone edge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brillouin Scattering and Optomechanics)
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Article
Elastic Characterization of Transparent and Opaque Films, Multilayers and Acoustic Resonators by Surface Brillouin Scattering: A Review
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 124; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8010124 - 16 Jan 2018
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2220
Abstract
There is currently a renewed interest in the development of experimental methods to achieve the elastic characterization of thin films, multilayers and acoustic resonators operating in the GHz range of frequencies. The potentialities of surface Brillouin light scattering (surf-BLS) for this aim are [...] Read more.
There is currently a renewed interest in the development of experimental methods to achieve the elastic characterization of thin films, multilayers and acoustic resonators operating in the GHz range of frequencies. The potentialities of surface Brillouin light scattering (surf-BLS) for this aim are reviewed in this paper, addressing the various situations that may occur for the different types of structures. In particular, the experimental methodology and the amount of information that can be obtained depending on the transparency or opacity of the film material, as well as on the ratio between the film thickness and the light wavelength, are discussed. A generalization to the case of multilayered samples is also provided, together with an outlook on the capability of the recently developed micro-focused scanning version of the surf-BLS technique, which opens new opportunities for the imaging of the spatial profile of the acoustic field in acoustic resonators and in artificially patterned metamaterials, such as phononic crystals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brillouin Scattering and Optomechanics)
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