Special Issue "Building-Integrated Photovoltaics"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Taehoon Hong
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture & Architectural Engineering,College of Engineering, Yonsei University,50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 03722, Korea
Interests: design and manufacturing of BIPV; theoretical and experimental investigation; techno-economic performance evaluation; solar energy trading; solar city
Dr. Choongwan Koo
Website
Guest Editor
Division of Architecture & Urban Design, College of Urban Sciences, Incheon National University, 119 Academy-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon, 22012, Korea
Interests: application of BIPV; modelling and simulation; nonlinearity and optimization; real-time monitoring and diagnostics; distributed generation; demand response

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

You are cordially invited to contribute to a Special Issue of Applied Science (IF = 1.679; https://www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci), focusing on “Building-Integrated Photovoltaics”.

It is reported that buildings account for about 40% of global energy consumption. Accordingly, interest in solar photovoltaic (PV) systems in buildings has increased with various advantages, such as competitive cost, increased efficiency, and government subsidies. Particularly, in a big city, with high-rise and high-density buildings, building-integrated PV (BIPV) systems are highly recommended by utilizing building façade and rooftop areas. Furthermore, BIPV allows distributed generation and provides more innovative electrical infrastructure.

This Special Issue aims to address potential challenges and opportunities in the design, development, optimization, operation, and extension of “Building-Integrated Photovoltaics”. We invite authors to submit original research papers or short communications, or comprehensive review articles on the latest achievements and innovations in building-integrated photovoltaics. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Design and Manufacturing of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics

  • Trends and Development in Building-Integrated Photovoltaics Technologies

  • Theoretical and Experimental Investigation on Building-Integrated Photovoltaics

  • Computational Modelling and Simulation of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics

  • Nonlinearity and Optimization in Building-Integrated Photovoltaics

  • Techno-Economic Performance Evaluation of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics

  • Real Time Monitoring and Diagnostics for Building-Integrated Photovoltaics

  • Remote Control and Operation of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics

  • Policy Issue: System Marginal Price, Solar Renewable Energy Credits, Solar Energy Trading, Block Chain Technology

  • Macro-Perspective: Distributed Generation, Demand Response, Energy Storage System, Smart Grid, Solar City

If you would be willing to write a paper for this Special Issue, we would need to receive your manuscript by 30 August 2018. Details on the manuscript preparation and categories may be found at Instructions for Authors (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci/instructions) for more information on the journal’s policies and the submission process.

Prof. Dr. Taehoon Hong
Dr. Choongwan Koo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Solar Photovoltaics and Technologies
  • Modelling & Simulation
  • Nonlinearity & Optimization
  • Techno-Economic Performance
  • Real Time Monitoring & Diagnostics
  • Remote Control & Operation
  • Solar Energy Policy
  • Distributed Generation
  • Demand Response
  • Smart Grid

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Performance Evaluation and Optimization of a Building-Integrated Photovoltaic/Thermal Solar Water Heating System for Exterior Shading: A Case Study in South China
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(24), 5395; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9245395 - 10 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Building-integrated photovoltaic/thermal (BIPV/T) systems can produce both electrical and thermal energy through the use of photovoltaic/thermal modules integrated with building envelope. Exterior shading is a common way to improve summer indoor thermal environment of the buildings in low latitudes. This study presents a [...] Read more.
Building-integrated photovoltaic/thermal (BIPV/T) systems can produce both electrical and thermal energy through the use of photovoltaic/thermal modules integrated with building envelope. Exterior shading is a common way to improve summer indoor thermal environment of the buildings in low latitudes. This study presents a BIPV/T solar water heating system for exterior shading of residences. In order to evaluate and optimize the system performances, a model was developed to simulate the thermal and electrical production of such system. The simulations for an example system in Guangzhou, a city in South China, were performed to investigate the influences of tank installation height and panel tilt angle on system performances. According to simulation results, the suggested tank installation height is 0.6~0.8 m. The shading coefficient ranges from 0.797 to 0.828 when the tilt angle varies from 14° to 38°. The reduction of panel tilt angle causes a certain improvement of shading performance. The annual auxiliary heat reaches the minimum when the panel tilt angle equals 28°, and the annual electric energy output changes little when the panel tilt angle ranges from 20° to 28°. Comprehensively considering thermal, electrical, and shading performances, the suggested panel tilt angle is 20°~28°. The average thermal and electrical efficiencies are respectively 38.25% and 11.95% when the panel tilt angle ranges from 20° to 28°. The presented system is a promising way to provide hot water, electricity, and exterior shading for residences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building-Integrated Photovoltaics)
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Open AccessArticle
Power Prediction of Bifacial Si PV Module with Different Reflection Conditions on Rooftop
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(10), 1752; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8101752 - 28 Sep 2018
Cited by 7
Abstract
A bifacial solar module has a structure that allows the rear electrode to be added to the existing silicon photovoltaic module structure. Thus, it can capture energy from both the front and rear sides of the module. In this paper, modeling is suggested [...] Read more.
A bifacial solar module has a structure that allows the rear electrode to be added to the existing silicon photovoltaic module structure. Thus, it can capture energy from both the front and rear sides of the module. In this paper, modeling is suggested to estimate the amount of energy generated from the rear of the bifacial photovoltaic module. After calculating the amount of irradiance from the rear side, the estimated power generation is compared with the real power output from the rear side of the module. The experiments were performed using four different environments with different albedos. The theoretical prediction of the model shows a maximum of 5% and average of 1.86% error in the measurement data. Based on the nature of the bifacial solar module, which receives additional irradiance from the rear side, this study compared the output amounts with respect to different rear environments. Recently, installation of floating Photovoltaic has been increasing. As the reflection of irradiation from the water surface occurs, the positive influence of the installation with the bifacial photovoltaic can be expected. We are confident that this research will contribute to zero energy construction by designing systems based on bifacial PV module with high performance ratio when applying solar power in a microgrid environment, which is the future energy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building-Integrated Photovoltaics)
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Open AccessArticle
Power Performance Loss Factor Analysis of the a-Si BIPV Window System Based on the Measured Data of the BIPV Test Facility
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(9), 1645; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8091645 - 13 Sep 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
The application of a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) module to an elevation means that the factors causing performance losses in a BIPV are relatively high compared to a photovoltaic (PV) that is installed at the optimal angle. Therefore, it is essential to evaluate the [...] Read more.
The application of a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) module to an elevation means that the factors causing performance losses in a BIPV are relatively high compared to a photovoltaic (PV) that is installed at the optimal angle. Therefore, it is essential to evaluate the performance loss factors of BIPV and to examine the characteristics of each performance loss factor. Measured data were used to analyze the performance and loss factors (module temperature, dust and soiling, power conditioning system (PCS) standby mode, direct current–alternating current (DC-AC) conversion loss). A performance ratio of International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61724 was used to power the generation performance analysis. The impact analysis of each loss factor is analyzed by using difference of the power generation, the module efficiency, irradiation, and the performance ratio according to the existence of a loss factor. The performance ratio analysis result of this BIPV system shows a range of 66.8–69.5%. The range of performance loss due to each loss factor was as follows; module temperature: 2.2–6.0%, dust and soiling: 2.2–23.1%, PCS standby loss: 4.9–15.7%, DC–AC conversion loss: 4.1–8.0%. Because the effects of the loss factors are different depending on the installation conditions, the performance loss of the system should be minimized by taking this into consideration in the design stage in the BIPV. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building-Integrated Photovoltaics)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Title: Photovoltaic panel integration on an irrigated green roof

Bracha Y. Schindler & Leon Blaustein

Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Science, University of Haifa.

Abstract: Green roofs, roofs planted with vegetation, are used to lower temperatures and increase biodiversity in cities, among other benefits. The integration of photovoltaic panels (PV) with green roofs is predicted to provide benefits for both the photovoltaic panels and the green roof, as the green roof cools the panels and the panels provide shade that is beneficial for some species. In this study, we examined the reciprocal effects of the green roof and PV on an irrigated green roof in a Mediterranean climate. In a replicated experiment, we included plots with a green roof versus a bituminous roof surface and green roof plots with and without PV. Irrigation was expected to maintain plant growth during the dry summer and promote cooling of the PV when temperatures are highest and PV efficiency is expected to decline. However, preliminary results indicate no effect of green roofs on panel temperature and electricity production throughout the summer.  We intend to do an experimental design on the Peres Peace Center in which we will irrigate or not irrigate the photovoltaic panels on the green roof. We suggest that irrigated panels will increase electricity production.

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