Special Issue "Advanced Flexible Electronics: Materials, Sensors, and Applications"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2021) | Viewed by 3924

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Carlos Garcia Nunez
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Guest Editor
Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), Institute of Thin Films, Sensors & Imaging (TFSI), University of the West of Scotland (UWS), Paisley PA1 2BE, UK
Interests: advanced materials and nanotechnology; thin-film technology; plasma physics; epitaxial growth; gravitational wave detection; low-mechanical-loss coatings; flexible/wearable electronics; energy-autonomous systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Hadi Heidari
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Microelectronics Lab, James Watt School of Engineering, James Watt Building (South), University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK
Interests: flexible wearable and implantable devices; microelectronics design; biomedical circuits and systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Sina Naficy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia
Interests: sensors; hydrogels; polymer gels; polymer network; soft robotics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Flexible electronics is a research field that has attracted great attention due to properties such as conformability, wearability, implantability and portability, making this technology suitable for advanced applications that are noncompatible with conventional rigid electronics. Flexible electronic devices can be utilised in multiple technological areas such as sensors, energy storage devices, energy harvesters, microelectronic devices and optoelectronics. This will allow the expansion of these technologies into novel applications, such as wearable healthcare sensing/monitoring systems, point-of-care portable devices, flexible displays, flexible smartphones/laptops, implantable devices and electronic skins. In this field, the investigation of suitable integration techniques to fabricate flexible electronic devices based on both organic and inorganic materials has been a matter of intensive research during the past decade. In particular, the latest developments in creating new materials including low-dimensional structures, smart soft matter, disposable functional materials, biocompatible composites and earth-abundant materials, as well as the development of ultra-high vacuum systems, additive manufacturing and chemical procedures to synthesize them, have fostered new research avenues in the field of flexible electronics. The full realisation of such multidevice structures with multifunctional properties requires the participation of a wider scientific community consisting of physicists, chemists, technologists and engineers, from academia and industries.

 

The Applied Sciences Journal is a leading academic journal that publishes cutting-edge research in this particular field. The journal is planning a Special Issue (to be published in April, 2020) focused on the progress in advanced flexible electronics. The topics that the Special Issue will include but not be limited to are:

  • Organic flexible electronic devices
  • Inorganic flexible electronic devices
  • Stretchable/wearable electronic devices
  • Implantable electronic devices
  • New approaches: design, integration and fabrication of flexible electronic devices

Dr. Carlos García Núñez
Dr. Hadi Heidari
Dr. Sina Naficy
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • flexible electronics
  • stretchable electronics
  • wearable electronics
  • implantable devices
  • flexible sensors
  • flexible actuators
  • smart soft matters

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Performance Enhancement of Flexible Polymer Triboelectric Generator through Polarization of the Embedded Ferroelectric Polymer Layer
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(3), 1284; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11031284 - 30 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1079
Abstract
In this work, we report on a flexible triboelectric generator (TEG) with a multilayer polymer structure, consisting of a poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) layer sandwiched by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers for the performance enhancement of TEGs. We confirmed that the output performance of the TEG [...] Read more.
In this work, we report on a flexible triboelectric generator (TEG) with a multilayer polymer structure, consisting of a poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) layer sandwiched by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers for the performance enhancement of TEGs. We confirmed that the output performance of the TEG is closely dependent on the structure and polarization direction of the PVDF-TrFE layer. In addition, the PDMS layer serves as the electron trapping layer and suppresses the discharging of the surface charges, boosting the output performance. Furthermore, the polarized PVDF-TrFE layer in the preferred direction contributes to increasing the surface potential during the contact–separation motion. The interaction between these two polymer layers synergistically leads to the boosted output performance of TEGs. Specifically, the maximum peak-to-peak output voltage and current density of 420 V and 50 μA/cm2 generated by the proposed architecture, representing approximately a fivefold improvement compared with the TEG with a single layer, even though the same friction layers were used for contact electrification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Flexible Electronics: Materials, Sensors, and Applications)
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Article
Low Velocity Impact Energy Monitoring and Recognition of Composite Laminates with Variable Thickness Based on Optical Fiber Sensor Network
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(2), 584; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11020584 - 08 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 614
Abstract
At present, most of the research on low velocity impact of composite laminates focuses on load location and damage assessment. To provide further early warnings about structural impact damage, impact energy can be monitored and identified. For high strength composite laminates with variable [...] Read more.
At present, most of the research on low velocity impact of composite laminates focuses on load location and damage assessment. To provide further early warnings about structural impact damage, impact energy can be monitored and identified. For high strength composite laminates with variable thickness, in order to further accurately evaluate the impact energy, it is necessary to adopt more suitable dynamic load signal analysis and impact energy identification methods. Therefore, a new low velocity impact monitoring and identification method for composite plates with variable thickness is proposed. All impact sample signals collected by optical fiber sensor network are decomposed by whitening Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD); the energy feature set is established according to the impact energy eigenvalue of sample signal; according to the first order component of signal decomposition, the thickness coefficient is determined and the energy feature set is modified to evaluate the actual impact energy. Meanwhile, combined with optical fiber sensing and signal processing technology, an impact energy monitoring system has been established, and the low velocity impact monitoring and identification experiments of composite laminates with variable thickness were carried out. The proposed energy identification method successfully identified 1–3 J impact energy with an average error of 4.82%, and the average error of large thickness area with low sensitivity was significantly reduced from 13.25% to 5.67%. The results show that the thickness coefficient correction method based on whitening EMD can evaluate the low velocity impact energy more accurately, and the thickness coefficient correction step significantly improves the recognition performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Flexible Electronics: Materials, Sensors, and Applications)
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Review

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Review
Recent Advances in Wearable Devices for Non-Invasive Sensing
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(3), 1235; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11031235 - 29 Jan 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1487
Abstract
The development of wearable sensors is aimed at enabling continuous real-time health monitoring, which leads to timely and precise diagnosis anytime and anywhere. Unlike conventional wearable sensors that are somewhat bulky, rigid, and planar, research for next-generation wearable sensors has been focused on [...] Read more.
The development of wearable sensors is aimed at enabling continuous real-time health monitoring, which leads to timely and precise diagnosis anytime and anywhere. Unlike conventional wearable sensors that are somewhat bulky, rigid, and planar, research for next-generation wearable sensors has been focused on establishing fully-wearable systems. To attain such excellent wearability while providing accurate and reliable measurements, fabrication strategies should include (1) proper choices of materials and structural designs, (2) constructing efficient wireless power and data transmission systems, and (3) developing highly-integrated sensing systems. Herein, we discuss recent advances in wearable devices for non-invasive sensing, with focuses on materials design, nano/microfabrication, sensors, wireless technologies, and the integration of those. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Flexible Electronics: Materials, Sensors, and Applications)
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