New Advances in Cereal Breeding and in Cereal Processing Technologies

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 1778

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Council for Agricultural Research and Economics, Research Centre for Engineering and Agro-Food Processing, Via Manziana 30, 00189 Rome, Italy
Interests: organic contaminants; wheat; cereals; micronisation; air-classification; standard grinding; pasta; bread

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Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture and Forest Sciences (DAFNE), University of Tuscia, Via San Camillo de Lellis snc, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Interests: genetics; wheat biofortification; starch; pigmented wheats; functional foods; yield

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Guest Editor
Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-Food and Forest Systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Via San Camillo de Lellis snc, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Interests: environmental science; agricultural and soil sciences; plant's responses to abiotic stresses; bioavailability and bioaccessibility of trace elements
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture and Forest Sciences (DAFNE), University of Tuscia, Via San Camillo de Lellis snc, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Interests: agricultural genetics; starch; genetic biofortification; wheat; functional foods; nutritional quality
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is focused on cereals and covers two main topics: the use of new technologies in plant breeding and the application of innovative processing technologies for the production of cereal-based foods.

Knowledge on and the diffusion of new breeding techniques (i.e., fast breeding, genome editing, cisgenesis, and intragenesis) have led to new perspectives for the improvement of different traits, such as yield, resilience to biotic and abiotic stresses, and technological and nutritional quality.

The use of new technologies in cereal processing is an effective way to produce foods free from chemical contaminants or enriched with beneficial compounds to ensure a variety of safe and healthy products.

Dr. Alessandro Cammerata
Dr. Samuela Palombieri
Dr. Rosita Marabottini
Dr. Francesco Sestili
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • breeding
  • cereals
  • milling
  • air-classified
  • stone milling
  • contaminants

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 1171 KiB  
Article
Enhancing the Protein, Mineral Content, and Bioactivity of Wheat Bread through the Utilisation of Microalgal Biomass: A Comparative Study of Chlorella vulgaris, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Tetraselmis chuii
by Nancy Mahmoud, Joana Ferreira, Anabela Raymundo and Maria Cristiana Nunes
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(6), 2483; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14062483 - 15 Mar 2024
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Abstract
At present, the incorporation of microalgae into bread and related cereal products has attracted attention due to their potential for enhancing nutritional profiles and their impact on health. In this study, 4% of Chlorella vulgaris, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Tetraselmis chuii were [...] Read more.
At present, the incorporation of microalgae into bread and related cereal products has attracted attention due to their potential for enhancing nutritional profiles and their impact on health. In this study, 4% of Chlorella vulgaris, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Tetraselmis chuii were added into wheat flour to produce bread and assesses their impact on the dough rheology behaviour, quality performance, nutritive value, and bioactive profile of bread. The results showed that T. chuii strengthened the dough network, whereas P. tricornutum exerted minimal influence. Notably, the incorporation of C. vulgaris induced a pronounced weakening of the protein network within the dough matrix, leading to disruptions in dough structure and subsequent alterations in starch gelatinisation and retrogradation. These changes lead to a reduction in the bread volume (22.7%) and a corresponding increase in its firmness when C. vulgaris was added. In contrast, T. chuii and P. tricornutum had no significant effect on bread volume. All microalgae species caused the dark green colour of the bread and enhanced the bread nutritional composition, namely in terms of protein content (14.7% increase in C. vulgaris bread) and mineral profile. The breads containing T. chuii exhibited a noticeable increase in both total phenolic content (from 7.22 in the control to 38.52 (µg GAE/g)) and antioxidant capacity (from 117.29 to 591.96 (µg TEAC/g) measured by FRAP). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Cereal Breeding and in Cereal Processing Technologies)
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10 pages, 987 KiB  
Article
Competition between Two Species of the Genus Sitophilus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Wheat and Barley
by Maria K. Sakka, George Terzis and Christos G. Athanassiou
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(21), 11872; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132111872 - 30 Oct 2023
Viewed by 496
Abstract
Species can coexist and infest stored products at different population densities. We evaluated the population growth of Sitophilus oryzae (L.) and Sitophilus granarius (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on wheat and barley in laboratory conditions. Ten adults of each species were placed in vials containing [...] Read more.
Species can coexist and infest stored products at different population densities. We evaluated the population growth of Sitophilus oryzae (L.) and Sitophilus granarius (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on wheat and barley in laboratory conditions. Ten adults of each species were placed in vials containing wheat or barley alone or in combination, and the number of adults was counted after 65 and 120 days. These tests were performed at 25 and 30 °C. Moreover, the number of damaged grain kernels and the weight of frass produced were also recorded. In general, the simultaneous presence of both species had a negative effect on the population growth of either S. oryzae or S. granarius. Nevertheless, no significant differences were noted regarding the number of damaged kernels and the weight of frass in most of the combinations tested. Moreover, the temperature seems to have a negative effect if both species were combined, especially at 30 °C. Our results showed that there was competition in the progeny production capacity when both species were together, but this competition was temperature and commodity-mediated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Cereal Breeding and in Cereal Processing Technologies)
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