Recent Advances in Antibiotic and Antibiotic Resistance Research in Food

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 11661

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Servicio de Zoonosis de Transmisión Alimentaria y Resistencia a Antimicrobianos (ZTA), VISAVET, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: antimicrobial resistance; one health; veterinary microbiology

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Guest Editor
Agroscope, 3003 Bern, Switzerland
Interests: food biotechnology; lactic acid bacteria; antimicrobials (bacteriocins, antimicrobial peptides); antibiotic resistance; food microbiology; dairy science; fermented foods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, a growing body of evidence has indicated that the food production chain may play a key role in the transmission of antimicrobial resistance among microorganisms present in food. Therefore, great efforts have been made to redirect antibiotic therapies in primary production, and extensive work has also been developed to try to understand at what points in the food chain the antimicrobial resistance transmission can be controlled and reduced. Likewise, new therapeutic and animal management strategies have also been developed that promote reduction in the use of antibiotics. This Special Issue welcomes both research and review papers on the most recent and innovative developments of antibiotics and antimicrobial resistance in foods. We hope the Special Issue can further encourage and promote scientific contributions of researchers in this field.

Prof. Dr. David Rodríguez-Lázaro
Dr. María Ugarte Ruiz
Dr. Ueli von Ah
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial resistance
  • antibiotic chemotherapy in animals
  • food safety
  • food chain
  • animal production
  • alternative animal chemotherapy
  • prevention
  • epidemiology
  • diagnostics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 555 KiB  
Article
Physiological Characteristics of Putative Enterobacteria Associated with Meat and Fish Available in Southern Brazilian Retail Markets: Antimicrobial Susceptibility, Toxic Metal Tolerance and Expression of Efflux Pumps
by Renata da Costa Barros Silva, Jéssica Andrade, Vanessa Cordeiro Dias, Jéssica Carla Sequeto, Nayara Felga Santos, Vânia Lúcia da Silva and Cláudio Galuppo Diniz
Antibiotics 2022, 11(12), 1677; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11121677 - 22 Nov 2022
Viewed by 1220
Abstract
Multidrug-resistant (MDR) mesophilic facultatively anaerobic Gram-negative rods are a public health issue and their spread from animal-source foods to humans is of concern worldwide. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and physiological aspects of such rods, [...] Read more.
Multidrug-resistant (MDR) mesophilic facultatively anaerobic Gram-negative rods are a public health issue and their spread from animal-source foods to humans is of concern worldwide. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and physiological aspects of such rods, including their tolerance to toxic metals and the screening of efflux pumps expressing isolates among enterobacteria isolated from meat (chicken, beef and pork) and fish samples acquired from retail establishments in a Brazilian urban Centre of over 2,300,000 inhabitants. The study revealed that 62.9% of isolated bacteria were resistant to at least one antimicrobial, of which 32.3% and 8.1% were resistant to one and two of the tested drugs, respectively. A resistance of up to six antimicrobials was also observed (0.9%). Out of the total amount, 22.7% were classified as MDR. Chicken was the meat that harbored most MDR isolates, and fish harbored the least. It was not possible to distinguish the different types of meat or fish considering the resistance patterns. The MDR isolates showed a higher tolerance to mercury and cadmium salts and the increased activity of the efflux mechanisms compared to other susceptible or resistant strains. In One Health. the perspective occurrence of putative MDR bacteria in fresh meat and fish draws attention to the antimicrobial resistance phenomenon in an open environment. Full article
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13 pages, 1288 KiB  
Article
Estimates of Dietary Exposure to Antibiotics among a Community Population in East China
by Yingying Wang, Xinping Zhao, Jinxin Zang, Yurong Li, Xiaolian Dong, Feng Jiang, Na Wang, Lufang Jiang, Qingwu Jiang and Chaowei Fu
Antibiotics 2022, 11(3), 407; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11030407 - 17 Mar 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2208
Abstract
Background: Antibiotics are widely used in clinics, livestock farms and the aquaculture industry. A variety of antibiotics in foods and drinking water may lead to important and inadvertent dietary exposure However, the profile of dietary exposure to antibiotics in humans is not well-explored. [...] Read more.
Background: Antibiotics are widely used in clinics, livestock farms and the aquaculture industry. A variety of antibiotics in foods and drinking water may lead to important and inadvertent dietary exposure However, the profile of dietary exposure to antibiotics in humans is not well-explored. East China is an economically developed area with a high usage of antibiotics and a high rate of antibiotic resistance (ABR). This study aimed to evaluate the total intake level of antibiotics in humans via foods and drinking water based on a community population in East China. Methods: A total of 600 local residents from 194 households were recruited into this study in Deqing County of Zhejiang Province since June 2019. Each subject was asked to fill a food frequency questionnaire to report their daily consumption of foods and drinking water. Tap water samples were collected from ten households and twenty-one antibiotics of five categories were selected to detect in drinking water. Data of antibiotic residues in animal-derived foods were obtained from the notification of unqualified edible agricultural products after special supervision sampling inspection in Deqing County. The human dietary exposure to antibiotics was estimated by combining the data of antibiotic contamination in foods and drinking water, and the information of dietary consumption. Results: Of twenty-one antibiotics selected, subjects were exposed to a total of sixteen antibiotics, ranging from 15.12 to 1128 μg/day via two main dietary routes (animal-derived foods and drinking water). The overall dietary exposure level varied greatly in the antibiotics detected and their sources. Compared with other antibiotics, enrofloxacin made the most contributions in terms of dietary exposure, with a median exposure level of 120.19 μg/day (IQR: 8.39–698.78 μg/day), followed by sulfamethazine (median: 32.95 μg/day, IQR: 2.77–162.55 μg/day) and oxytetracycline (median: 28.50 μg/day, IQR: 2.22–146.58 μg/day). The estimated exposure level via drinking water (at the ng/day level, median: 26.74 ng/day, IQR: 16.05–37.44 ng/day) was significantly and substantially lower than those via animal-derived foods (at the μg/day level, median: 216.38 μg/day, IQR: 87.52–323.00 μg/day). The overall dietary exposure level also showed differences in sex and age. Males and youths were more likely to be exposed to antibiotics via dietary routes than others. Conclusions: The community population investigated in East China was extensively exposed to multiple antibiotics via dietary routes. Long-term exposure to low-dose antibiotics in animal-derived foods was the primary dietary exposure route, compared with drinking water. Enrofloxacin contributed to the major body burden of dietary exposure, based on the combination of consumption of aquatic products and considerable enrofloxacin residues in them. Although the human dietary exposure level to antibiotics via drinking water and animal-derived foods ranged from ng/day to μg/L, their chronic toxicity and the accumulation and spread of ABR may be potential hazards to humans. Therefore, long-term monitoring of antibiotic contaminations in foods and drinking water, and human dietary antibiotic exposure is warranted. Full article
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23 pages, 2790 KiB  
Article
Multi-Drug Resistant Escherichia coli, Biosecurity and Anti-Microbial Use in Live Bird Markets, Abeokuta, Nigeria
by Oluwawemimo Adebowale, Motunrayo Makanjuola, Noah Bankole, Mary Olasoju, Aderonke Alamu, Eniola Kperegbeyi, Oladotun Oladejo, Olubunmi Fasanmi, Olanike Adeyemo and Folorunso O. Fasina
Antibiotics 2022, 11(2), 253; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11020253 - 16 Feb 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3107
Abstract
Live bird markets (LBM) remain a critical link from farm to fork in the poultry value chain, which oftentimes promotes indiscriminate antimicrobial use (AMU) and resistance (AMR). In this study, we assessed biosecurity practices, AMU, and associated these with multidrug resistant (MDR) E. [...] Read more.
Live bird markets (LBM) remain a critical link from farm to fork in the poultry value chain, which oftentimes promotes indiscriminate antimicrobial use (AMU) and resistance (AMR). In this study, we assessed biosecurity practices, AMU, and associated these with multidrug resistant (MDR) E. coli in LBMs in Abeokuta, Ogun State. A cross-sectional survey among live bird sellers (LBS) in eight LBMs was conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire. Also, cloacal samples (n = 200) were randomly collected and pooled for bacteriological detection of MDR E. coli in live chickens of consenting LBS. Susceptibility to 14 antimicrobials belonging to 6 different classes was determined using the disk diffusion method. Biosecurity level and AMU were generally low. LBS less than 46 years were 6.8- fold more likely to fall within the poor biosecurity level (Crudes odds ratio = 6.8; 95% CI; 1.20–38.56; p = 0.03) than others. An informal or primary school education increased the odds of having a poor practice of AMU by 15.1 folds (Crudes odds ratio = 15.1; 95% CI; 2.73–84.18; p = 0.002) than those with secondary or tertiary. The prevalence of E. coli and MDR E. coli at the LBM level were 80% and 56.3%, respectively. Extremely high resistance rates were observed for ceftazidime (96.9%) and imipenem (90.6%). The odds of MDR E. coli increased eight-fold in poultry kept by LBS who use AMs as prophylaxis. This current data could be useful for the development of targeted behavioral risk communication and mitigation strategies for AMR to impede the potential horizontal transfer of AMR genes to humans through animal-sourced food. Full article
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21 pages, 3869 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Effect of an Oxytetracycline Treatment on the Gut Microbiome and Antimicrobial Resistance Gene Dynamics in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)
by Christopher J. Payne, James F. Turnbull, Simon MacKenzie and Margaret Crumlish
Antibiotics 2021, 10(10), 1213; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10101213 - 06 Oct 2021
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3924
Abstract
Antibiotics play a vital role in aquaculture where they are commonly used to treat bacterial diseases. However, the impact of antibiotic treatment on the gut microbiome and the development of antimicrobial resistance in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) over time remains to [...] Read more.
Antibiotics play a vital role in aquaculture where they are commonly used to treat bacterial diseases. However, the impact of antibiotic treatment on the gut microbiome and the development of antimicrobial resistance in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) over time remains to be fully understood. In this study, fish were fed a single treatment of oxytetracycline (100 mg/kg/day) for eight days, followed by a 14-day withdrawal period. Changes in the distal gut microbiome were measured using 16S rRNA sequencing. In addition, the abundance of antimicrobial resistance genes was quantified using real-time qPCR methods. Overall, the gut microbiome community diversity and structure of Nile tilapia was resilient to oxytetracycline treatment. However, antibiotic treatment was associated with an enrichment in Plesiomonas, accompanied by a decline in other bacteria taxa. Oxytetracycline treatment increased the proportion of tetA in the distal gut of fish and tank biofilms of the treated group. Furthermore, the abundance of tetA along with other tetracycline resistance genes was strongly correlated with a number of microbiome members, including Plesiomonas. The findings from this study demonstrate that antibiotic treatment can exert selective pressures on the gut microbiome of fish in favour of resistant populations, which may have long-term impacts on fish health. Full article
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