Antibiotic Resistance in Antibiotic Producers and Other Bacteria: Genes, Mechanisms, Evolution, and Surveillance

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanism and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1157

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Insubria, 21100 Varese, Italy
Interests: antibiotic resistance; microbial genetics; peptide antibiotics; antibiotic-producing actinobacteria

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Insubria, 21100 Varese, Italy
Interests: antibiotics; glycopeptide antibiotics; antibiotic resistance mechanism; fermentation; strain improvement; microbial biotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Competition between/within antibiotic producers and other bacteria is an inherent feature of environmental microbiomes, driving the co-evolution of antibiotic production and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes. Although this process is likely millions of years old, it first appeared in the scope of researchers after human pathogens started to evolve resistance to antibiotics used in clinics. All aspects of AMR in bacteria have become a subject of scrupulous research and debate, since it is a serious public health problem. One of the most intriguing questions here is the origin and evolution of AMR genes, whether in producers or not. The application of modern genomics and transcriptomics, next-generation sequencing approach, as well as advanced computational analysis methods allows the problem of AMR to be highlighted with unprecedented commitment.

The current Special Issue seeks the submission of manuscripts that will allow us to deepen our current understanding of how bacteria—including antibiotic producers, environmental bacteria, and pathogens—resist antibiotics, using genetics, molecular biology, and different “-omics” approaches. We also welcome submissions on the surveillance of AMR genes in different environments. Manuscripts unraveling the evolution of AMR are especially encouraged. This Special Issue accepts original research articles, reviews, and case reports.

Dr. Oleksandr Yushchuk
Dr. Elisa Binda
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antibiotic resistance genes
  • antibiotic resistance mechanisms
  • evolution of antibiotic resistance
  • genomics
  • AMR (antimicrobial resistance)
  • MDR (multidrug resistance)
  • ESKAPE
  • MRSA/VRSA
  • ESBL
  • CRE

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 729 KiB  
Article
In Vitro Activity of “Old” and “New” Antimicrobials against the Klebsiella pneumoniae Complex
by Alicja Sękowska
Antibiotics 2024, 13(2), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13020126 - 26 Jan 2024
Viewed by 899
Abstract
The Klebsiella pneumoniae complex is a commonly isolated bacteria in human infections. These opportunistic pathogens pose a serious threat to public health due to their potential transmission to the human population. Resistance to carbapenems is a significant antimicrobial resistance mechanism, leading to limited [...] Read more.
The Klebsiella pneumoniae complex is a commonly isolated bacteria in human infections. These opportunistic pathogens pose a serious threat to public health due to their potential transmission to the human population. Resistance to carbapenems is a significant antimicrobial resistance mechanism, leading to limited therapeutic options. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of fosfomycin, colistin, ceftazidime–avibactam, and meropenem–vaborbactam against multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae complex strains. This study involved 160 strains of Gram-negative rods, comprising 138 K. pneumoniae and 22 K. variicola. The minimal inhibitory concentration of fosfomycin was estimated using the agar dilution method, and for colistin, the microdilution method was employed. Susceptibility to ceftazidime–avibactam and meropenem–vaborbactam was determined using the gradient strip method. All analyzed K. pneumoniae complex isolates produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases, and 60.0% exhibited carbapenemases. The majority of the analyzed strains were susceptible to fosfomycin and colistin (62.5%). Among pandrug-resistant K. pneumoniae complex isolates, the highest susceptibility was observed with colistin (43.9%). Fosfomycin demonstrated good activity against ESβLs- and VIM-positive isolates from this complex. Colistin also exhibited satisfactory in vitro activity against VIM- and KPC-positive isolates from the K. pneumoniae complex. Ceftazidime–avibactam displayed good activity against K. pneumoniae complex strains producing ESβLs, KPC, and OXA enzymes. Additionally, meropenem–vaborbactam showed satisfactory in vitro activity against ESβLs- and KPC-positive isolates from this complex. Full article
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