Novel Research Discoveries in Fresh Meats

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 7884

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
University of Nevada, Reno, NV, USA

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Guest Editor
Department of Animal Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Interests: meat science; muscle biology

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Guest Editor
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA

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Guest Editor
University of Nevada, Reno, NV, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Consumer demand for sustainable and wholesome fresh meat products is associated with desirable quality attributes, food safety, and concerns about nutritional value. Over the past 50 years, the meat industry quadrupled its production by improving the growth performance of livestock and processing efficiency. Simultaneously, novel biological and physical tools have been developed to predict quality, safety, and nutritional value of meat. For example, different types of spectroscopy and the omics approach (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics, microbiomics, phenomics, etc.) seem to be promising techniques to predict not only eating quality, but also food safety and nutritional value of fresh meats. Examples of current research using novel qualitative and quantitative research methodologies continue to emerge in the meat science research discipline. These include, but are certainly not limited to, the many examples observed in animal growth and development (i.e., genetics, nutrition, and management), during the slaughter process (i.e., animal handling, carcass hygiene, and carcass chilling), during the aging of fresh meat products, and throughout storage/display of fresh meat products. These advancements in technology have without a doubt improved eating quality, food safety, and nutritional value of fresh meat products.

To summarize, this fresh meats Special Issue will focus on 1. Emerging technologies for the prediction of quality, food safety, and nutrition of fresh meat products (including but not limited to omics approaches and non-destructive image- and/or spectra-based techniques); 2. Applications of traditional and novel techniques to improve meat quality traits; and 3. Animal feeding effects on quality attributes and nutritional values.

Dr. Amilton De Mello
Dr. Thu Dinh
Prof. Dr. Mozart A. Fonseca
Dr. Benjamin M. Bohrer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Fresh meats
  • omics
  • sensory attributes
  • spectroscopy
  • meat color
  • food safety
  • and nutritional values

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 297 KiB  
Article
Meat Quality of Nellore Young Bulls—Effects of Different Days on Feed and Zilpaterol Hydrochloride Supplementation
by Mariana Caetano, Rodrigo Silva Goulart, Saulo Luz Silva, Sergio Bertelli Pflanzer, Paulo Roberto Leme, Antonio Carlos Ramos dos Santos and Dante Pazzanese Duarte Lanna
Animals 2021, 11(9), 2688; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11092688 - 14 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1909
Abstract
Ninety-six Nellore young bulls were fed (90 or 117 day) diets containing ZH (8.33 mg/kg) for 0, 20, 30, or 40 days to evaluate the effects of days on feed (DOF) and length of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) supplementation on meat quality. At the [...] Read more.
Ninety-six Nellore young bulls were fed (90 or 117 day) diets containing ZH (8.33 mg/kg) for 0, 20, 30, or 40 days to evaluate the effects of days on feed (DOF) and length of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) supplementation on meat quality. At the end of feeding period, animals were slaughtered, and samples of the Longissimus muscle were collected to evaluate the chemical composition, fatty acid profile, color stability, shear force, and sensory profile. DOF did not affect chemical composition, shear force, sensory tenderness, and most of fatty acids; however, animals fed for 90 d had lower redness (p < 0.01), sustained juiciness (p < 0.01), and more flavor (p = 0.03) than those fed for 117 d. The ZH supplementation decreased lipid content and redness (p < 0.01), initial and sustained tenderness (p < 0.01), initial and sustained juiciness (p < 0.01), but increased protein (p < 0.01) and shear force (p < 0.01) as compared to non-supplemented animals. The ZH supplementation increased total PUFA, c9,c12-18:2, and 20:4-n6, and decreased c9-20:1 (p < 0.05). Feeding ZH impairs meat quality attributes of Nellore young bulls, regardless of duration of supplementation, while DOF has a small effect on meat quality properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Research Discoveries in Fresh Meats)
15 pages, 873 KiB  
Article
Impacts of in Utero Heat Stress on Carcass and Meat Quality Traits of Market Weight Gilts
by Jacob R. Tuell, Mariah J. Nondorf, Jacob M. Maskal, Jay S. Johnson and Yuan H. Brad Kim
Animals 2021, 11(3), 717; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11030717 - 6 Mar 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2248
Abstract
This study evaluated the impacts of in utero heat stress (IUHS) on the carcass and meat quality traits of offspring when market weight was reached. Twenty-four F1 Landrace × Large White gilts were blocked by body weight and allocated among thermoneutral (IUTN) or [...] Read more.
This study evaluated the impacts of in utero heat stress (IUHS) on the carcass and meat quality traits of offspring when market weight was reached. Twenty-four F1 Landrace × Large White gilts were blocked by body weight and allocated among thermoneutral (IUTN) or IUHS treatments from d 6 to d 59 of gestation. The offspring were raised under identical thermoneutral conditions, and gilts (n = 10/treatment) at market weight (117.3 ± 1.7 kg) were harvested. At 24 h postmortem, the loins (M. longissimus lumborum) were obtained, and sections were allocated among 1 d and 7 d aging treatments at 2 °C. Carcasses from IUHS pigs had lower head and heart weights (p < 0.05), as well as decreased loin muscle area (p < 0.05) compared to IUTN pigs. Loins from the IUHS group had a higher shear force value than the IUTN group (p < 0.05). Treatments had no other impacts on carcass and meat quality traits (p > 0.05), and Western blots suggested increased toughness of IUHS loins would not be attributed to proteolysis. These results suggest minimizing IUHS during the first half of gestation may be beneficial in improving pork yield and quality, though in general the effects of IUHS would be minimal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Research Discoveries in Fresh Meats)
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Review

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11 pages, 764 KiB  
Review
Connecting Heat Tolerance and Tenderness in Bos indicus Influenced Cattle
by Tracy L. Scheffler
Animals 2022, 12(3), 220; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12030220 - 18 Jan 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2832
Abstract
Bos indicus cattle are widely utilized in tropical and subtropical climates. Their heat tolerance and parasite resistance are integral for beef production in these regions; however, a reputation for excitable temperaments, slower growth, and variation in tenderness has limited their use in commercial [...] Read more.
Bos indicus cattle are widely utilized in tropical and subtropical climates. Their heat tolerance and parasite resistance are integral for beef production in these regions; however, a reputation for excitable temperaments, slower growth, and variation in tenderness has limited their use in commercial beef production. This suggests that there is antagonism between heat tolerance and meat production traits. Meat quality characteristics are determined by the properties of skeletal muscle as well as conditions during slaughter and processing. Thus, it is possible that adaptations related to heat tolerance in the living animal affect tenderness and other meat quality attributes. Since muscle represents a large proportion of body mass, relatively small changes at the cellular level could impact overall heat production of the animal. Specifically, protein degradation and mitochondria function are aspects of organ and cellular metabolism that may help limit heat production and also have a connection to tenderness. Protein degradation postmortem is critical to structural changes that enhance tenderness whereas mitochondria may influence tenderness through their roles in energy metabolism, calcium regulation, cell death signaling, and oxidative stress. This review explores potential relationships between cellular metabolism in vivo and beef quality development in Bos indicus and Bos indicus influenced cattle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Research Discoveries in Fresh Meats)
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