Canine Behavior, Behavioral Wellbeing

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Companion Animals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 29086

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
Interests: behavior disorders; behavioral wellbeing; translational research; biomarkers; objective measurement; dogs; cats; companion animals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Canine behaviors have been studied from the aspect of owner’s perceptions, symptoms of behavior disorders, and medical disorders such as neurological conditions or pain. In recent years, as the knowledge of this field has grown, there is increased awareness of the importance of psychological and behavioral well-being and their impact on the physiological health of dogs. However, we also realize more studies are needed to collect quantitative data that allow for clinical application.

Multidimensional factors that help to enhance our scientific understanding of canine behaviors are

  • Interpreting and evaluating behaviors;
  • Preventing behavior disorders;
  • Optimizing therapeutic outcomes;
  • Evaluating behavior training and management;
  • Assessing environmental factors;
  • Examining influence of caregiver’s satisfaction or burden.

This Special Issue welcomes contributions on these topics in original and clinical investigations or literature reviews from interdisciplinary research.

Dr. Niwako Ogata
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • behavior assessment
  • behavior problems/disorders
  • behavioral well-being
  • behavior management/treatment
  • behavior modification

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 627 KiB  
Article
Dog Owner Perceptions of Veterinary Handling Techniques
by Amber Diane Carroll, Alissa Cisneros, Hannah Porter, Carly Moody and Anastasia Chiara Stellato
Animals 2022, 12(11), 1387; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12111387 - 27 May 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4668
Abstract
Veterinary care can be a source of stress for domestic dogs and their owners. If a dog owner is not satisfied with the veterinary experience, this may reduce the frequency of veterinary visits and negatively impact a dog’s health and welfare. Allowing dog [...] Read more.
Veterinary care can be a source of stress for domestic dogs and their owners. If a dog owner is not satisfied with the veterinary experience, this may reduce the frequency of veterinary visits and negatively impact a dog’s health and welfare. Allowing dog owners to offer their perspectives on aspects of the veterinary appointment may help improve owner satisfaction. We assessed owner agreement towards 13 recommended handling techniques used on dogs during routine veterinary appointments, when the participants’ dog was calm, fearful, or aggressive. An online cross-sectional survey targeting current dog owners, residing in Canada and the United States, was used to examine the influence of participant’s pet attachment (using the Lexington Attachment to Pets Scale (LAPS)) and demographic information (age, gender, experience working in the veterinary field) on owner agreement towards the handling techniques. The majority of participants (N = 1176) disagreed with higher restraint techniques (e.g., full body restraint, muzzle hold) and tools (e.g., dog mask), and agreed with lower restraint techniques (e.g., minimal restraint) regardless of dog demeanor. Logistic regression models revealed that for medium/large dog owners, having previous veterinary work experience resulted in lower agreement with the use of minimal restraint (p < 0.0001) and higher agreement with the use of full body restraint on fearful dogs (p = 0.01). Small dog owners were more likely to agree with the use of minimal restraint on fearful dogs if they had a higher pet attachment score (p < 0.001), and were more likely to agree with full body restraint if they had previous veterinary work experience (p < 0.0001) or were male (p = 0.02). Owner perspectives align with current handling recommendations and provide further support for the use of low stress handling methods to improve owner satisfaction and dog welfare during routine veterinary care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Canine Behavior, Behavioral Wellbeing)
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9 pages, 1860 KiB  
Communication
Temperament Assessment Algorithm in Dogs
by Mirosław Karpiński, Justyna Wojtaś and Aleksandra Garbiec
Animals 2022, 12(5), 634; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12050634 - 02 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2276
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the temperament of dogs on the basis of behavioral observations, with emphasis on 24 selected traits and behaviors. From the observations, the temperament of the dogs was determined and the animals were assigned to one [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the temperament of dogs on the basis of behavioral observations, with emphasis on 24 selected traits and behaviors. From the observations, the temperament of the dogs was determined and the animals were assigned to one of two personality groups: introvert or extrovert. The study involved 46 dogs. The agglomeration method, Pearson’s 1-r distance, and Ward’s binding method were used. As shown by the statistical analysis, 18 dogs (39%) were assessed as introverts and 28 dogs (61%) exhibited extrovert traits. To construct a model for the assessment of canine temperament using the identified traits, logistic regression was performed with the independent variables, number of extrovert traits (ETs) and introvert traits (ITs), and a dichotomous dependent variable (1 = extrovert, 0 = introvert), reflecting the assessment of the temperament of the dog based on the observations and results of the original questionnaire. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Canine Behavior, Behavioral Wellbeing)
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8 pages, 497 KiB  
Article
Salivary Chromogranin A (CgA) Response to the Noradrenaline Transporter Blocker Atomoxetine in Dogs
by Takanori Kooriyama, Abhijit Mukhopadhyay, George E. Moore and Niwako Ogata
Animals 2021, 11(10), 2844; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11102844 - 29 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1604
Abstract
Since salivary chromogranin A (CgA) is one of the known sympathetic adrenomedullar system (SAM) stress markers in humans and pigs, this study aimed to investigate whether salivary CgA in dogs reflects SAM activation. Our hypothesis was that salivary CgA would increase when central [...] Read more.
Since salivary chromogranin A (CgA) is one of the known sympathetic adrenomedullar system (SAM) stress markers in humans and pigs, this study aimed to investigate whether salivary CgA in dogs reflects SAM activation. Our hypothesis was that salivary CgA would increase when central noradrenaline was pharmacologically induced. A selective noradrenaline transporter blocker, atomoxetine, was orally administered without causing any aversive responses in nine laboratory dogs to see if it would increase salivary CgA. Three treatment groups (i.e., atomoxetine, placebo, and pre-administration of a selective alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist (dexmedetomidine) followed by atomoxetine) were prepared with a randomized crossover design. Saliva sample collection, heart rate measurement and behavior observation were performed at Time 0 (baseline) and at 30, 60, 90 and 150 min after each treatment administration. The results demonstrated that salivary CgA significantly increased at 90 min in the atomoxetine treatment (p < 0.05), whereas it was not observed in the other two treatments. The present study showed that salivary CgA was increased by atomoxetine-induced SAM activation. However, this increase was blocked if dexmedetomidine was pre-administered. Overall, the results indicate that salivary CgA is a potential candidate for SAM-mediated stress markers in dogs. Further study to determine the dynamics of salivary CgA will be helpful in its practical use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Canine Behavior, Behavioral Wellbeing)
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12 pages, 577 KiB  
Article
An Investigation into the Impact of Pre-Adolescent Training on Canine Behavior
by Ian R. Dinwoodie, Vivian Zottola and Nicholas H. Dodman
Animals 2021, 11(5), 1298; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11051298 - 30 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 15517
Abstract
An online survey about puppy training was sent to members of the Center for Canine Behavior Studies and posted on our social media platforms. Six hundred forty-one (641) qualifying owners provided information on 1023 dogs. About half (48%) of the dogs involved in [...] Read more.
An online survey about puppy training was sent to members of the Center for Canine Behavior Studies and posted on our social media platforms. Six hundred forty-one (641) qualifying owners provided information on 1023 dogs. About half (48%) of the dogs involved in the study attended puppy training and the balance (52%) did not. The goal of the study was to find out whether puppy training at various ages (1–3 months, 4 months, 5–6 months) helped prevent behavior problems later in life (≥1 year). Attending training at 6 months of age or younger resulted in 0.71 the odds of developing aggressive behavior (95% CI: 0.53–0.97; p = 0.030), 0.64 the odds of having a compulsive behavior (95% CI: 0.45–0.92; p = 0.015), 0.60 the odds of exhibiting destructive behavior (95% CI: 0.37–0.96; p = 0.035), 0.68 the odds of excessive barking (95% CI: 0.47–0.99; p = 0.043), and 1.56 the odds of house soiling (95% CI: 1.08–2.27; p = 0.019). Ancillary findings about the entire study population were that dogs acquired at 12 weeks of age or younger were found to have 0.65 the odds of fear/anxiety (95% CI: 0.46–0.92; p = 0.016) and 0.50 the odds of exhibiting destructive behavior (95% CI: 0.31–0.79; p = 0.003). In addition, male dogs were found to have 0.68 the odds of developing aggressive behavior (95% CI: 0.53–0.88; p = 0.003), 0.66 the odds of developing compulsive behavior (95% CI: 0.49–0.88; p = 0.006), 0.37 the odds of mounting/humping (95% CI: 0.26–0.52; p < 0.001), and 1.53 the odds of rolling in repulsive materials (95% CI: 1.18–1.97; p = 0.001). Neutered dogs of either sex were found to have 3.10 the odds of fear/anxiety (95% CI: 2.05–4.72; p < 0.001), 1.97 the odds of escaping/running away (95% CI: 1.12–3.69; p = 0.025), 2.01 the odds of exhibiting coprophagia (95% CI 1.30–3.19; p = 0.002), and 1.72 the odds of rolling in repulsive materials (95% CI: 1.12–2.66; p = 0.014). The odds of problematic jumping deceased by 0.84 for each 1-year increase in age (95% CI: 0.80–0.88; p < 0.001). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Canine Behavior, Behavioral Wellbeing)
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11 pages, 690 KiB  
Article
Changes in Behaviour and Voluntary Physical Activity Exhibited by Sled Dogs throughout Incremental Exercise Conditioning and Intermittent Rest Days
by Eve Robinson, Emma Thornton, James R. Templeman, Candace C. Croney, Lee Niel and Anna K. Shoveller
Animals 2021, 11(1), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11010118 - 08 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3385
Abstract
Participation in repetitive endurance training decreases sled dogs’ voluntary activity and locomotive behaviours; however, the changes in their voluntary physical activity over consecutive rest days has not been examined to assess exercise-recovery. The objective of this study was to examine the changes in [...] Read more.
Participation in repetitive endurance training decreases sled dogs’ voluntary activity and locomotive behaviours; however, the changes in their voluntary physical activity over consecutive rest days has not been examined to assess exercise-recovery. The objective of this study was to examine the changes in behaviour and voluntary activity of sled dogs throughout repetitive incremental conditioning and intermittent rest days. Fourteen dogs (6 males, 8 females; age 3.7 ± 2.7 years; BW 21.5 ± 2.8 kg) underwent 10 weeks of conditioning. Once a week, 5-min video recordings were taken pre- and post-exercise to measure the time spent performing agonistic behaviours, chewing on the gangline, digging, jumping, lunging, posture changing, sitting, standing and lying. Additionally, voluntary physical activity was measured on a day with an exercise bout during baseline, week 4, 5 and 7 and two consecutive rest days during baseline, week 1, 4, 5 and 7. A repeated-measures mixed model was used to analyse data in SAS (v 9.4.). As dogs progressed through their conditioning, the time spent changing posture prior to an exercise bout decreased (p < 0.05), suggesting that dogs may reduce their voluntary locomotive behaviours with increasing exercise. Additionally, dogs were more active during the second consecutive rest day than the first (p < 0.05), suggesting that rest days may provide a short-term recovery period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Canine Behavior, Behavioral Wellbeing)
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