Zoonotic Corona Viruses – Animal & Human Health Implications

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021) | Viewed by 9315

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Penn State University, Wiley Lane, University Park, PA 16802-1110, USA
Interests: microbiology; animal health; food safety; bacteriology; virology; co-infections; microbiome in health and disease; veterinary diagnostics

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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Penn State University, Wiley Lane, University Park, PA 16802-1110, USA
Interests: zoonotic and emerging viruses; diagnostic assay development; immune responses to viruses; viral pathogenesis; viral vaccines and anti-virals
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Guest Editor
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
Interests: microbiology; food safety; animal health; microbiome in health and disease; poultry health and translational animal models

Special Issue Information

Coronaviruses (CoV) are the largest enveloped single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses, with bats being recognized as their oldest known reservoir hosts. Recombination and adaptation events have contributed to the emergence of several new CoV species, including SARS-CoV-2, by facilitating their jump from natural reservoirs to humans and successful host shifts. The faulty proofreading activity of the viral replicase and the recombination ability of viral polymerase during co-infections explain the characteristic genetic plasticity associated with CoVs. This genetic plasticity allows CoVs to acquire virulence factors, have dynamic antigenic profiles, extend their host range, and show variable tissue tropism, enabling the emergence of zoonotic viruses with increased pathogenicity in the same species or adaptation to unusual hosts, result in exceptionally rapid viral spread, as is occurring in the COVID-19 pandemic. The ability of CoVs to undergo cross species transmission and the risks underlining the possible human–animal transmission route, including the proximity of wild and domestic animals, are other concerns that need to be addressed. Henceforth, for this Special Issue, we invite authors to submit original research articles, short communications, perspectives, and reviews that evaluate the transmission dynamics of zoonotic CoVs at the human–animal interface to improve the understanding of the whole spectrum of diseases by identifying risk groups/species and comorbid conditions that make the condition more severe as well as the effectiveness of certain public health interventions. This collected information will also help us to evaluate and restructure existing biosecurity measures that can be adopted for prospective viral pandemics.

Dr. Meera Surendran Nair
Prof. Suresh Varma Kuchipudi
Dr. Divek V. T. Nair
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • zoonotic
  • CoV
  • transmission
  • pathogenesis
  • animals
  • human
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • recombination
  • genetic plasticity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

41 pages, 2877 KiB  
Review
Pathology of Coronavirus Infections: A Review of Lesions in Animals in the One-Health Perspective
by Valentina Zappulli, Silvia Ferro, Federico Bonsembiante, Ginevra Brocca, Alessandro Calore, Laura Cavicchioli, Cinzia Centelleghe, Giorgia Corazzola, Steffen De Vreese, Maria Elena Gelain, Sandro Mazzariol, Valentina Moccia, Nicolò Rensi, Alessandro Sammarco, Filippo Torrigiani, Ranieri Verin and Massimo Castagnaro
Animals 2020, 10(12), 2377; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10122377 - 11 Dec 2020
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 8817
Abstract
Coronaviruses (CoVs) are worldwide distributed RNA-viruses affecting several species, including humans, and causing a broad spectrum of diseases. Historically, they have not been considered a severe threat to public health until two outbreaks of COVs-related atypical human pneumonia derived from animal hosts appeared [...] Read more.
Coronaviruses (CoVs) are worldwide distributed RNA-viruses affecting several species, including humans, and causing a broad spectrum of diseases. Historically, they have not been considered a severe threat to public health until two outbreaks of COVs-related atypical human pneumonia derived from animal hosts appeared in 2002 and in 2012. The concern related to CoVs infection dramatically rose after the COVID-19 global outbreak, for which a spill-over from wild animals is also most likely. In light of this CoV zoonotic risk, and their ability to adapt to new species and dramatically spread, it appears pivotal to understand the pathophysiology and mechanisms of tissue injury of known CoVs within the “One-Health” concept. This review specifically describes all CoVs diseases in animals, schematically representing the tissue damage and summarizing the major lesions in an attempt to compare and put them in relation, also with human infections. Some information on pathogenesis and genetic diversity is also included. Investigating the lesions and distribution of CoVs can be crucial to understand and monitor the evolution of these viruses as well as of other pathogens and to further deepen the pathogenesis and transmission of this disease to help public health preventive measures and therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zoonotic Corona Viruses – Animal & Human Health Implications)
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