Special Issue "New Approaches to Non-Surgical Sterilization for Dogs and Cats"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Companion Animals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Giovanni M. Lacalandra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine (DiMeV), Section of Obstetric Clinic, University of Bari "Aldo Moro", via per Casamassima km 3, 70010 Valenzano, Bari, Italy
Interests: endocrine and hormonal and reproductive conditioning of birds and wild animals; pregnancy physiology; fetal development; interaction between thyroid function and reproduction; embryo recovery of sheep; in vitro maturation and fertilization of oocytes in animals; interaction between endogenous opioids and reproduction studies
Dr. Raffaella Leoci
E-Mail
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Section of Obstetric Clinic, University of Bari Aldo Moro, sp per Casamassima km 3, Valenzano, 70010 Bari, Italy
Interests: non-surgical sterilization of companion animals; ultrasound; mechanical castration; intratesticular injection of chemicals; chemical castration; non-conventional therapies; treatment of andrological diseases; remote identification of stray dogs subjected to sterilization treatment
Prof. Giulio G. Aiudi
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Section of Obstetric Clinic, University of Bari Aldo Moro, sp per Casamassima km 3, Valenzano, 70010 Bari, Italy
Interests: Male and female genital pathologies in animals and non-conventional species; reproductive conditioning in dogs and cats; biotechnology studies and improvement of reproductive performance; veterinary andrology; non-surgical contraception; chemical sterilization methods in dogs and cats

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As it is well known, the attempts to control the reproduction of companion animals have a long history. More recently the most commonly used methods have been spaying and neutering. Surgical sterilization has had an important role in reducing the number of stray or euthanized pet in shelters, but it requires infrastructure and resources that make it unsuitable to reduce the population of unwanted dogs and cats worldwide. Unfortunately has been estimated that there are more than 200 million stray dogs worldwide that means that new strategies have to be found. Since the mid-1970s, researchers have been investigating alternatives to using surgery to sterilize dogs and cats. Pharmacological techniques, ultrasounds, intra-testicular injections of chemicals etc. have been studied. Early research investigated the novel idea that animals could be induced to mount an immune response to antigens that are important in reproduction, such as gonadotropins or zona pellucida proteins or the use of a cytotoxin conjugate that could directly target a subset of cells critical for reproduction.

The aim of this Special Issue is therefore to gather the most recent scientific findings on the topic of non-surgical sterilization. Original manuscripts that address different aspects of this topic are invited.

Prof. Giovanni M. Lacalandra
Dr. Raffaella Leoci
Prof. Giulio G. Aiudi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dog
  • cat
  • reproduction
  • non-surgical sterilization

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Reproductive and Behavioral Evaluation of a New Immunocastration Dog Vaccine
Animals 2020, 10(2), 226; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10020226 - 31 Jan 2020
Abstract
Canine immunocastration development has been of interest for many years as a complementary strategy to surgical castration. The purpose of this paper was to verify the effect of a recombinant vaccine for dog immunocastration. Two tests were done, one under controlled conditions and [...] Read more.
Canine immunocastration development has been of interest for many years as a complementary strategy to surgical castration. The purpose of this paper was to verify the effect of a recombinant vaccine for dog immunocastration. Two tests were done, one under controlled conditions and a second under field conditions. Animals were injected with 1 mL of 500 µg GnRXG/Q recombinant protein; 500 µg of low molecular weight chitosan as adjuvant; 1 mL NaCl 0.9% q.s. In the first trial, eight Beagle male dogs between the ages of 1 and 3 comprised the sample, randomly divided into two groups: vaccinated group (n = 7) and control group (n = 2). The second trial had 32 dogs with owners. In the first controlled conditions trial, the vaccine produced specific antibodies that remained until the end of the trial (day 270), inducing reduced testosterone and spermiogram changes in the immunized animals. In a second trial, on the field, specific immunity was induced, which remained high up to day 150. The vaccine also reduced sexual agonistic and marking behaviors. This new vaccine proved to be safe, immunogenic, capable of reducing gonadal functionality, and had a positive effect on inducing reduced sexual, agonistic, and marking behavior of the animals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Approaches to Non-Surgical Sterilization for Dogs and Cats)
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