Step by Step: Detection, Diagnosis, Control and Treatment of Ruminant Lameness and Foot Diseases

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 848

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Institute for Microbiology and Infection, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
Interests: epidemiology; infectious diseases; lameness; ruminants; welfare

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We want ruminants to live long and healthy lives in order to minimize their impact on climate change and antimicrobial resistance. Despite considerable research and knowledge exchange, lameness continues to be prevalent and debilitating in ruminants worldwide, and a reduction in the prevalence and incidence of lameness in herds and flocks would improve their quality of life, and contribute positively to these global challenges.

We are in the midst of a wave of novel technologies being employed to address lameness in ruminants. The aim of this Special Issue is to collect recent research on the enhanced detection, diagnosis, control, and treatment of lameness and foot diseases in ruminants, with the aim of highlighting advances and further challenges regarding this important subject.

Prof. Dr. Laura E. Green
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • ruminant lameness
  • detection and diagnosis
  • prevention and treatment
  • housing and environment
  • automation
  • diagnostic tools
  • epidemiology and modelling

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 877 KiB  
Article
Epidemiology of Digital Dermatitis in Western Canadian Feedlot Cattle
by Sarah Erickson, Calvin Booker, Jiming Song, Eugene Janzen, Murray Jelinski and Karen Schwartzkopf-Genswein
Animals 2024, 14(7), 1040; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14071040 - 29 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Digital dermatitis (DD) is an emerging disease in feedlot cattle. Our objective was to identify animal- and feedlot-level risk factors for DD by analyzing individual animal health records (n = 1,209,883) and feedlot-level records from western Canadian feedlots (n = 28) [...] Read more.
Digital dermatitis (DD) is an emerging disease in feedlot cattle. Our objective was to identify animal- and feedlot-level risk factors for DD by analyzing individual animal health records (n = 1,209,883) and feedlot-level records from western Canadian feedlots (n = 28) between 2014 and 2018, inclusive. The risk of a DD diagnosis was higher (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 2.08, 95% CI 1.52 to 2.86) in cattle sourced from confined background operations (CB) versus cattle sourced from auction markets (AM). Conversely, ranch direct (RD) cattle were (IRR = 0.02, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.30) lower risk than AM cattle of being diagnosed with DD. The risk of being diagnosed with DD was higher in females than in males. The magnitude of the risk in females over males was influenced by annual DD incidence in low morbidity years (2014, 2017, and 2018) (IRR = 2.02, 95% CI 1.27 to 3.19), medium morbidity years (2016) (IRR = 2.95, 95% CI 1.64 to 5.33), and high morbidity years (2015) (IRR = 5.41, 95% CI 3.27 to 8.95). At the feedlot-level, the risk of a diagnosis of DD was lower in small capacity (SCF) versus large capacity feedlots (LCF) (IRR = 0.24, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.76). Future research should focus on identifying factors that may propagate disease transmission between cattle of different sexes and from different acquisition sources. Full article
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