Special Issue "Cropping System Impact on Soil Quality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Soils".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 January 2023 | Viewed by 1064

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Joanna Lemanowicz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biogeochemistry and Soil Science, Bydgoszcz University of Science and Technology, Al. prof. S. Kaliskiego 7, 85-796 Bydgoszcz, Poland
Interests: enzymes; soil; macroelements; agriculture; environmental
Prof. Dr. Agata Bartkowiak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biogeochemistry and Soil Science, Bydgoszcz University of Science and Technology, Al. prof. S. Kaliskiego 7, 85-796 Bydgoszcz, Poland
Interests: heavy metals; soil; environmental; soil organic carbon

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

The Guest Editors are inviting submissions to a Special Issue on “Cropping System Impact on Soil Quality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions”. Atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gases (GHG) carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4) continue to rise globally due to anthropogenic activities. Soil tillage, sowing, fertilizer, and pesticide addition have significant impacts on GHG emissions through perturbations in the carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and water dynamics of these agroecosystems. Agriculture is responsible for approximately 12% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture is a measure that aims to increase soil organic carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas emission rates through improved management practices.

This Special Issue focuses on the role that agricultural cropping systems play in greenhouse gas emissions. For this reason, it welcomes highly interdisciplinary quality studies from disparate research fields, including agriculture, landscaping, and environmentalism. Original research articles and reviews are accepted.

Prof. Dr. Joanna Lemanowicz
Prof. Dr. Agata Bartkowiak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • greenhouse gas emissions
  • soil organic carbon
  • fertilization
  • crop production
  • environment
  • soil properties
  • cropping system
  • CO2
  • N2O
  • CH4

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Dairy Slurry Application to Stubble-Covered Soil: A Study on Sustainable Alternatives to Minimize Gaseous Emissions
Agriculture 2022, 12(7), 1021; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture12071021 - 14 Jul 2022
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Abstract
The development of sustainable application practices, which do not demand incorporation into the soil, is necessary to encourage slurry use in conservation agriculture (CA). Incorporation is the most common practice to reduce nitrogen losses from the applied slurry. However, in CA, soil disturbance [...] Read more.
The development of sustainable application practices, which do not demand incorporation into the soil, is necessary to encourage slurry use in conservation agriculture (CA). Incorporation is the most common practice to reduce nitrogen losses from the applied slurry. However, in CA, soil disturbance must be avoided. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate strategies to reduce gaseous emissions from dairy slurry applied to stubble-covered soil without incorporation. We evaluated (1) effects on ammonia (NH3) emissions of pretreatment by acidification (ADS), irrigation (IR) and placement under the stubble (US); and (2) effects of ADS, IR, US and delayed fertilization (RDS T16) on greenhouse gases (GHG). The results of the evaluated strategies were compared to raw slurry (RDS) and ammonium sulphate (MS). Additionally, in experiment 2, the results were compared to ammonium sulphate (MB) and slurry injection (IN), both in bare soil. ADS, US and IR decreased NH3 emissions by 66%, 60% and 32.5%, respectively, with total N emissions NH3 emissions accounting for more than 79% of N losses in slurry-based treatments. Late application reduced N2O emissions by 48%. GHG emissions from ADS, US and IR were similar to those from MS, MB and IN. ADS, US and IR are the most suitable strategies for slurry application in CA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cropping System Impact on Soil Quality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions)
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Article
Enzymatic Activity of Soil after Applications Distillery Stillage
Agriculture 2022, 12(5), 652; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture12050652 - 30 Apr 2022
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Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the fertilizing value of rye stillage used in the cultivation of winter triticale cv. ‘Grenado’. The research was performed in 2018 (autumn, before the application of the stillage), 2019, and 2020 (spring and autumn after stillage application) on [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the fertilizing value of rye stillage used in the cultivation of winter triticale cv. ‘Grenado’. The research was performed in 2018 (autumn, before the application of the stillage), 2019, and 2020 (spring and autumn after stillage application) on Luvisoil at the depth levels of 0–20 and 20–40 cm. Each year, the basic soil parameters were analyzed, i.e., pH in 1M KCl, organic carbon (Corg), available phosphorus (P), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu). Enzymes were also accounted: alkaline phosphatase (AlP), acid phosphatase (AcP), and dehydrogenases (DEH). The use of stillage resulted in a significant increase in the content of P, K, and Mg and the activity of AlP, AcP, and DEH in the soil. It significantly increased the Corg content and did not have a significant effect on pH. The obtained results indicate that the response of the enzymatic activity to the distillery stillage depended on both the sampling season soil and the depth. However, it is necessary to systematically monitor the pH of the soil and at the same time to rationally apply mineral fertilization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cropping System Impact on Soil Quality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions)
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