Special Issue "Emerging Processing Technologies for Agricultural Products"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Johnselvakumar Lawrence
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Kansas State University, Bulk Solids Innovation Center, 607 N Front St, Salina, KS, 67401, USA
Interests: storage and handling of food ingredient; grain drying and storage; pneumatic conveying of food powders
Dr. Karunanithy Chinnadurai
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Russell Stover Chocolates, 4900 Oak Street, Kansas City, MO 64112, USA
Interests: extrusion; drying; product development; continuous improvement; statistical process control; ingredient functionality; properties of food materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Consumers are demanding fresh-tasting and nutritious healthy processed foods for their nutrients and convenience, at an affordable price, which necessitates the development of new food processing techniques. One can observe the free claims and better for you claims from the products found in the supermarket aisles. The next generation of food processing technologies deals with the following health related parameters, such as increased dietary fiber, decreased calories, decreased saturated fat, no trans fatty acids, poly and mono unsaturated fats in place of other fats, reduced cholesterol, reduced salt, reduced sugar, increased probiotics, increased natural anti-oxidants and anti-carcinogens, no artificial colors, preservatives, additives, and a long shelf life with no loss of nutritional value. Food scientists are facing numerous challenges while addressing the above requirements in order to meet the consumer demand. New technologies need to be developed to tackle the above requirement in processed food development.  The emerging processing technologies, such as high pressure processing, ohmic heating, pulsed electric field processing, non-thermal processing, minimal processing, irradiation, ultrasonication, super critical carbon dioxide, processing of low water activity products, cold plasma and micro filtration are used in the food industries. Many of these technologies are not standardized yet and needed further research to enhance its suitability to particular application. This Special Issue covers various topics related to new technologies, methods and techniques used to enhance the foods of the future.

Dr. Johnselvakumar Lawrence
Dr. Karunanithy Chinnadurai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • High pressure processing
  • ohmic heating
  • pulsed electric field processing
  • non-thermal processing
  • minimal processing
  • irradiation
  • ultrasonication
  • cold plasma
  • micro filtration
  • Super critical carbon dioxide
  • Processing low water activity products
  • Electron beam

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Pectin Extraction Conditions and Polyphenol Profile from Citrus x lantifolia Waste: Potential Application as Functional Ingredients
Agriculture 2017, 7(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture7030028 - 15 Mar 2017
Cited by 6
Abstract
The citrus by-products pectin and polyphenols were obtained from Citrus x lantifolia residues. The use of acid type, solute-solvent ratio, temperature, and extraction time on pectin yield recovery was evaluated using a factorial design 34; pectin physicochemical characterization, polyphenol profile, and [...] Read more.
The citrus by-products pectin and polyphenols were obtained from Citrus x lantifolia residues. The use of acid type, solute-solvent ratio, temperature, and extraction time on pectin yield recovery was evaluated using a factorial design 34; pectin physicochemical characterization, polyphenol profile, and antioxidant activity were also determined. Results indicated a total polyphenol content of 3.92 ± 0.06 mg Galic Acid Equivalents (GAE)/g of citrus waste flour in dry basis (DB), with antioxidant activity of 74%. The presence of neohesperidin (0.96 ± 0.09 mg/g of citrus flour DB), hesperidin (0.27 ± 0.0 mg/g of citrus flour DB), and ellagic acid (0.18 ± 0.03 mg/g of citrus flour DB) as major polyphenols was observed. All of the factors evaluated in pectin recovery presented significant effects (p < 0.05), nevertheless the acid type and solute-solvent ratio showed the greatest effect. The highest yield of pectin recovery (36%) was obtained at 90 °C for 90 min, at a ratio of 1:80 (w/v) using citric acid. The evaluation of pectin used as a food ingredient in cookies elaboration, resulted in a reduction of 10% of fat material without significant texture differences (p < 0.05). The pectin extraction conditions and characterization from these residues allowed us to determine the future applications of these materials for use in several commercial applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Processing Technologies for Agricultural Products)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Effect of High Pressure Processing on the Microbial Inactivation in Fruit Preparations and Other Vegetable Based Beverages
Agriculture 2017, 7(9), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture7090072 - 30 Aug 2017
Cited by 7
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to review the effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure Processing (HPP) on the safety of different fruit derivatives (juices, nectars, jams, purees, pastes…), considering the types established in the European legislation and some other vegetable-based beverages (mainly juices [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to review the effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure Processing (HPP) on the safety of different fruit derivatives (juices, nectars, jams, purees, pastes…), considering the types established in the European legislation and some other vegetable-based beverages (mainly juices and smoothies). The main inactivation processes and mechanisms on microorganisms are reviewed. Studies have revealed that HPP treatment is capable of destroying most microorganisms, depending on the application conditions (amplitude of the pressure, duration time, temperature, and the mode of application), the properties of the fresh and processed fruit/vegetables (pH, nutrient composition, water activity, maturity stage), and the type of microorganisms or viruses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Processing Technologies for Agricultural Products)
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