Special Issue "Conservation and Characterization of Vegetable Crop Biodiversity"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Genotype Evaluation and Breeding".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Robert Jarret
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit Research Horticulturist, 1109 Experiment st griffin, GA 30223, USA
Interests: Biodiversity; genetic resources; genetics/genomics; genebank/collection management
Dr. Maarten Van Zonneveld
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
World Vegetable Center, Tainan 70101,Taiwan
Interests: Biodiversity; genetic resources; genetics/genomics; genebank/collection management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Characterization of vegetable genetic resources takes many forms. The goals of such studies are often crop- or taxon-specific and tailored to provide information on the presence and/or the range of unique, and typically agriculturally important, characteristics within a defined set of plant materials. The procedures used to accomplish such goals may be quite simple (i.e., collection of descriptor data on fruit maturity or color) or more technically complex (i.e., using next generation sequencing (NGS) approaches to characterize collections for their diversity or to identify a core collection). Similarly, approaches applied for the conservation of vegetable crops germplasm are also crop- and taxon-specific and include, for example, defining practices facilitating field or greenhouse production of seed, the development and use of specialized in vitro or cryogenic procedures for longer-term maintenance or pathogen elimination, and the use of global positioning system (GPS) data to locate/conserve ecologically and/or taxonomically unique plant materials, among many others. This Special Issue invites reports of recent efforts to conserve and characterize vegetable crops germplasm. Relevant articles would include (but are not limited to):

  • Use of novel approaches or technologies to improve the efficiency of, or reduce the resources associated with, seed production of vegetable crops germplasm and/or their wild relatives,
  • Use of emerging technologies, such as high-throughput phenotyping or the use of robotics, to capture characterization data in the field or greenhouse,
  • Applications of artificial intelligence in efforts characterize or conserve vegetable crops germplasm,
  • Use of molecular/NGS approaches to characterize collections or populations of vegetable crops genetic resources,
  • Studies characterizing vegetable crops germplasm collections using traditional (morphological data) approaches,
  • Studies and technologies used to identify the occurrence and distribution of vegetable crop species and their wild relatives, and
  • Selection of vegetable crop core collections.

Prof. Dr. Robert Jarret
Dr. Maarten Van Zonneveld
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • germplasm
  • genetic resources
  • genebank
  • biodiversity
  • vegetable
  • characterization
  • conservation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The World Vegetable Center Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) Core Collection as a Source for Flooding Stress Tolerance Traits for Breeding
Agriculture 2021, 11(2), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11020165 - 18 Feb 2021
Viewed by 549
Abstract
Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) is a heat tolerant vegetable crop with high economic and nutritional importance in parts of Asia, Africa, and America. The okra biodiversity held in gene bank collections could be mined for traits for breeding more stress tolerant and [...] Read more.
Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) is a heat tolerant vegetable crop with high economic and nutritional importance in parts of Asia, Africa, and America. The okra biodiversity held in gene bank collections could be mined for traits for breeding more stress tolerant and nutritional cultivars. An okra core collection of 166 accessions comprising A. esculentus, A. moschatus, A. caillei, and A. manihot has been assembled from the World Vegetable Center germplasm collection (840 accessions) based on diversity analysis with 20 microsatellite markers. A selection of A. esculentus accessions of the core collection (75 accessions) and 20 breeder-selected genotypes have been screened for variation of their response to flooding stress under field conditions using a high throughput phenotyping system. Growth increment per day and changes of physiological indices were measured before, during, and after application of 9 days of flooding stress. Several accessions showed only a small reduction in daily growth increment during flooding. Across the germplasm panel, maintained growth was correlated with maintained normalized differential vegetation index and was negatively correlated with plant senescence index. Accessions with maintained growth and health under flooding were selected for future further analysis and use in breeding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conservation and Characterization of Vegetable Crop Biodiversity)
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Open AccessArticle
Biosystematic Study on Some Egyptian Species of Astragalus L. (Fabaceae)
Agriculture 2021, 11(2), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11020125 - 04 Feb 2021
Viewed by 471
Abstract
Astragalus L. is one of the largest angiosperm complex genera that belongs to the family Fabaceae, subfamily Papilionoideae or Faboideae under the subtribe Astragalinae of the tribe Galegeae. The current study includes the whole plant morphology, DNA barcode (ITS2), and molecular marker (SCoT). [...] Read more.
Astragalus L. is one of the largest angiosperm complex genera that belongs to the family Fabaceae, subfamily Papilionoideae or Faboideae under the subtribe Astragalinae of the tribe Galegeae. The current study includes the whole plant morphology, DNA barcode (ITS2), and molecular marker (SCoT). Ten taxa representing four species of Astragalus were collected from different localities in Egypt during the period from February 2018 to May 2019. Morphologically, identification and classification of collected Astragalus plants occurred by utilizing the light microscope, regarding the taxonomic revisions of the reference collected Astragalus specimens in other Egyptian Herbaria. For molecular validation, ten SCoT primers were used in this study, producing a unique banding pattern to differentiate between ten samples of Astragalus taxa which generated 212 DNA fragments with an average of 12.2 bands per 10 Astragalus samples, with 8 to 37 fragments per primer. The 212 fragments amplified were distributed as 2 monomorphic bands, 27 polymorphic without unique bands, 183 unique bands (210 Polymorphic with unique bands), and ITS2 gene sequence was showed as the optimal barcode for identifying Astragalus L. using BLAST searched on NCBI database, and afterward, analyzing the chromatogram for ITS region, 10 samples have been identified as two samples representing A. hauarensis, four samples representing A. sieberi, three samples representing A. spinosus and one sample representing A. vogelii. Based on the ITS barcode, A. hauarensis RMG1, A. hauarensis RMG2, A. sieberi RMG1, A. sieberi RMG2, A. sieberi RMG3, A. sieberi RMG4, A. spinosus RMG1, A. spinosus RMG2, A. spinosus RMG3, A. vogelii RMG were deposited into GenBank with accession # MT367587.1, MT367591.1, MT367593.1, MT367585.1, MT367586.1, MT367588.1, MT160347.1, MT367590.1, MT367589.1, MT367592.1, respectively. These results indicated the efficiency of SCoT markers and ITS2 region in identifying and determining genetic relationships between Astragalus species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conservation and Characterization of Vegetable Crop Biodiversity)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Conservation Gaps in Traditional Vegetables Native to Europe and Fennoscandia
Agriculture 2020, 10(8), 340; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10080340 - 06 Aug 2020
Viewed by 1217
Abstract
Vegetables are rich in vitamins and other micronutrients and are important crops for healthy diets and diversification of the food system, and many traditional (also termed underutilized or indigenous) species may play a role. The current study analyzed 35 vegetables with a European [...] Read more.
Vegetables are rich in vitamins and other micronutrients and are important crops for healthy diets and diversification of the food system, and many traditional (also termed underutilized or indigenous) species may play a role. The current study analyzed 35 vegetables with a European region of diversity with the effort to map the conservation status in Fennoscandia and beyond. We mapped georeferenced occurrences and current genebank holdings based on global databases and conducted conservation gaps analysis based on representativeness scores in situ and ex situ. Out of the 35 target species, 19 got at a high priority score for further conservation initiatives, while another 14 species got a medium priority score. We identified a pattern where traditional vegetables are poorly represented in genebank holdings. This corresponds well to a lack of attention in the scientific community measured in number of published papers. Considering the grand challenges ahead in terms of climate change, population growth and demand for sustainability, traditional vegetables deserve greater attention. Our contribution is to provide a basis for conservation priorities among the identified vegetables species native to Fennoscandia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conservation and Characterization of Vegetable Crop Biodiversity)
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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Loofah Lines for Resistance to Tomato Leaf Curl New Delhi Virus and Downy Mildew, as well as Key Horticultural Traits
Agriculture 2020, 10(7), 298; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10070298 - 15 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 936
Abstract
Two loofah (Luffa) species, the ridge gourd (Luffa acutangula (L.) Roxb.) and the sponge gourd (L. cylindrica (L.) M. Roem.; syn. L. aegyptiaca), are cultivated widely in Asia by smallholder famers. Both species have significant economic and [...] Read more.
Two loofah (Luffa) species, the ridge gourd (Luffa acutangula (L.) Roxb.) and the sponge gourd (L. cylindrica (L.) M. Roem.; syn. L. aegyptiaca), are cultivated widely in Asia by smallholder famers. Both species have significant economic and nutritional importance. However, Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) and downy mildew (DM) caused by Pseudoperonospora cubensis are important biotic constraints to loofah production throughout Asia. Loofah landrace-derived breeding lines, developed at the World Vegetable Center (WorldVeg), were evaluated at the WorldVeg East and Southeast Asia Research and Training Station, Kasetsart University, Kamphaeng Saen, Thailand—where natural epidemics of ToLCNDV and DM regularly occur. The lines were also evaluated for other commercially important horticultural traits such as days to 50% staminate and pistillate flowering, fruit color, fruit bitterness, and market segment classification. Thirteen and 59 lines of ridge gourd and sponge gourd, respectively, were determined to be resistant to both ToLCNDV and DM. These lines covered all market segments of loofah and exhibited variability for all of the evaluated horticultural traits. The results of these evaluations and their implications on loofah breeding are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conservation and Characterization of Vegetable Crop Biodiversity)
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