Special Issue "Sustainable Pest Management for Coffee Production"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Systems and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 12 April 2023 | Viewed by 2042

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Madelaine Venzon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Agriculture and Livestock Research Enterprise of Minas Gerais (EPAMIG), Vila Gianetti 46, Viçosa, MG, Brazil
Interests: conservation biological control; agroforestry; organic farming; biological control; entomology; pest management
Prof. Dr. Angelo Pallini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Entomology, Federal University of Viçosa, Campus UFV, Minas Gerais 36570-900, Brazil
Interests: agricultural acarology; food web interaction in agroecosystems; entomology; crop protection; applied ecology; pest management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Conventional management of coffee pests relies on chemical pesticides, but environmental problems, pest resistance, toxicity-related issues, and trader compliance have led coffee growers to search for alternatives for pest control. Agroecological strategies suitable for coffee cultivation can be adopted by farmers based on plant diversification in order to provide resources for natural enemies, such as nectar, pollen, shelter, microclimate conditions, and oviposition sites, thereby promoting conservation biological control. Additionally, curative measures using less harmful pesticides such as botanical extract and oils and biopesticides are important during periods of high pest populations. Using resistant coffee cultivars, monitoring of pests and knowledge of pest spatial distribution are essential tools for successful sustainable coffee management.

This Special Issue focuses on the above strategies. We welcome original studies addressing them, as well as those on coffee food web interactions on insects and mite communities.

Prof. Dr. Madelaine Venzon
Prof. Dr. Angelo Pallini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • conservation biological control
  • biopesticides
  • coffee berry borer
  • coffee leaf miner
  • mites
  • food web interactions
  • pest monitoring
  • coffee pest resistance cultivars

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Survival Analysis of the Green Lacewing, Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) Exposed to Neem-Based Products
Agriculture 2023, 13(2), 292; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13020292 - 26 Jan 2023
Viewed by 363
Abstract
Brazil is the country which has produced the most coffee for over 150 years, and to achieve high productivity, pesticides are the most common control measure for pests. Due to the need to adopt less impactful control practices, natural enemies or insecticides of [...] Read more.
Brazil is the country which has produced the most coffee for over 150 years, and to achieve high productivity, pesticides are the most common control measure for pests. Due to the need to adopt less impactful control practices, natural enemies or insecticides of botanical origin have been studied as alternatives to synthetic insecticides. However, botanical pesticides can negatively affect some natural enemies, and the effect depends on the formulation and concentration. The objective of this study was to estimate the survival of green lacewing larvae, Chrysoperla externa (Hagen), exposed to different doses of neem-based products, whose active ingredient is azadirachtin (Azamax®: 0 (control treatment with distilled water), 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, and 108 mg a.i. L−1; Organic neem®: 0, 3.3, 6.6, 9.9, 13.2, 16.5, 19.8, 23.1, and 26.4 mg a.i. L−1; Natuneem®: 0, 3.8, 7.5, 10.5, 15.0, 18.8, 22.5, 26.3, 30.0, and 33.8 mg a.i. L−1), using a parametric approach. Predator larvae were exposed to neem-based insecticides and evaluated for 20 days. Survival curves estimated by the models—Log-logistic for Azamax®, Weibull for Organic neem®, and Log-normal for Natuneem®—demonstrated an inverse relationship between increasing doses and survival time. These concluded that the application dose should be less than 84 mg a.i. L−1 for Azamax®, 19.8 mg a.i. L−1 for Organic neem®, and 26.3 mg a.i. L−1 for Natuneem® to keep 50% of the green lacewings alive for 13 days, which is the average time for the larval cycle of C. externa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Pest Management for Coffee Production)
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Article
Intercropped Plants Provide a Reservoir of Predatory Mites in Coffee Crop
Agriculture 2023, 13(2), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13020285 - 24 Jan 2023
Viewed by 341
Abstract
Conservation biological control of pests may be achieved using a variety of integrated strategies based on crop diversification. We investigated whether the insertion of the intercropped plants species (IPS) Inga edulis, Senna macranthera, and Varronia curassavica modified the abundance of mites, [...] Read more.
Conservation biological control of pests may be achieved using a variety of integrated strategies based on crop diversification. We investigated whether the insertion of the intercropped plants species (IPS) Inga edulis, Senna macranthera, and Varronia curassavica modified the abundance of mites, their feeding behavior, and the dissimilarity of predator and herbivore mites over a gradient of distance from the IPS on coffee. To accomplish this, we recorded the mite species on coffee plants along transects of 16 m extending from the IPS, including on the IPS. A total of 8946 specimens were sampled. Tenuipalpidae was the most abundant family on coffee, followed by Tydeidae, while Eriophyidae was the most abundant on the IPS, followed by Phytoseiidae. The abundance and richness of mites differed between their feeding behavior and distance. The dissimilarity of predators and herbivores increased along a gradient of distance. Furthermore, the IPS harbored several mite species and the diversity of predator and herbivore mites among the IPS was different. The findings suggest that the intercropped plant species can attract and serve as a reservoir of predatory mites on coffee crops, which could improve the biocontrol of pest mites on coffee. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Pest Management for Coffee Production)
Article
Plants for Fitness Enhancement of a Coffee Leaf Miner Parasitoid
Agriculture 2023, 13(2), 244; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13020244 - 19 Jan 2023
Viewed by 279
Abstract
The enhancement of pest control through the conservation of natural enemies in agricultural fields is called conservation biological control. One of the strategies used on this system is to introduce or manage plants that can provide food for natural enemies. We assessed the [...] Read more.
The enhancement of pest control through the conservation of natural enemies in agricultural fields is called conservation biological control. One of the strategies used on this system is to introduce or manage plants that can provide food for natural enemies. We assessed the effect of feeding resources on the fitness of a coffee leaf miner parasitoid, Proacrias coffeae Ihering (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), by evaluating the effect of different nectar resources on the survival of P. coffeae. To do so we used three flowering plants: Bidens pilosa, Galinsoga parviflora, and Varronia curassavica, and the leguminous shrub, Senna cernua Balb. H.S. Irwin & Barneby which produces extrafloral nectar. When feeding on the floral nectar of V. curassavica and on the extrafloral nectar of S. cernua the parasitoids increased their survival, however, no significant differences were found when feeding on B. pilosa and G. parviflora. We evaluated the effect of extrafloral nectar of S. cernua on the egg load of P. coffeae and found an increase in their egg load when exposed to the extrafloral nectar and with increasing age. Our results show the potential of V. curassavica and S. cernua as nutritional resources to enhance the fitness of the parasitoid P. coffeae, by increasing their survival. Based on the research study, it is evident that the introduction of feeding resources for P. coffeae in the coffee agroecosystem will increase their fitness as a potential biocontrol agent by enhancing their survival and reproductive potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Pest Management for Coffee Production)
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Article
Metarhizium Associated with Coffee Seedling Roots: Positive Effects on Plant Growth and Protection against Leucoptera coffeella
Agriculture 2022, 12(12), 2030; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture12122030 - 28 Nov 2022
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Abstract
Metarhizium species can be mutualistic symbionts of plants. They are able to colonize roots, promote plant growth and provide protection against pests. We previously found Metarhizium robertsii and M. brunneum associated with coffee roots in a diversified coffee system. Here, we investigated whether [...] Read more.
Metarhizium species can be mutualistic symbionts of plants. They are able to colonize roots, promote plant growth and provide protection against pests. We previously found Metarhizium robertsii and M. brunneum associated with coffee roots in a diversified coffee system. Here, we investigated whether these fungi, when inoculated in coffee seedlings, can associate with roots, improve seedling growth and indirectly protect against the coffee leaf miner (CLM) Leucoptera coffeella (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae). We performed a greenhouse experiment with coffee seedlings using suspensions of each Metarhizium species applied as soil drenches to potted seedlings. We also challenged these plants with CLM infestation (two adult couples per plant). We recovered Metarhizium spp. from most of the seedling roots 43 days after fungal inoculation. Plants inoculated with M. robertsii showed a 30% leaf area increase compared to the control. Both isolates promoted protection against CLM in coffee seedlings, reducing the percentual of leaf area mined and prolonging CLM development time by two days versus controls. Besides this protection provided by Metarhizium, M. robertsii also improves seedling growth. Therefore, these Metarhizium species could be considered for the development of inoculants for coffee seedlings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Pest Management for Coffee Production)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: INTERCROPPED PLANTS AS A RESERVOIR OF PREDATORY MITES IN COFFEE CROP WITH A DESCRIPTION OF A NEW SPECIES
Authors: JÚLIA JANTSCH FERLA; Madelaine Venzon; Gustavo Júnior de Araújo; Angelo Pallini
Affiliation: Agriculture and Livestock Research Enterprise of Minas Gerais (EPAMIG), Vila Gianetti 46, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil

Title: USE OF GEOSTATISTICS AS A TOOL TO STUDY SPATIAL- TEMPORAL DYNAMICS OF Leucoptera coffeella IN COFFEE CROPS
Authors: ADRIANA HELENA WALERIUS; Angelo Pallini; Marcelo Picanço
Affiliation: Federal University of Viçosa, Dep. Entomology, Campus UFV, Minas Gerais, 36570-900. Brazil

Title: CAN BUCKWHEAT BE USED FOR CONVERVATION BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF COFFEE LEAF MINER?
Authors: Madelaine Venzon
Affiliation: Agriculture and Livestock Research Enterprise of Minas Gerais (EPAMIG), Vila Gianetti 46, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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