Special Issue "Aircraft Emissions and Climate Impact"

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310). This special issue belongs to the section "Aeronautics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kostas Eleftheratos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology and Geoenvironment, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimioupoli Zografou, 15784 Athens, Greece
Interests: the changes in the composition of the atmosphere on short and long time and space scales; the study of natural climatic oscillations; atmospheric effects from aircraft emissions; atmospheric pollution; changes in climatic parameters; environmental effects on health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to gather high quality scientific papers that focus on the atmospheric effects from aircraft emissions. Air traffic emits greenhouse and trace gases, soot, sulphur aerosols, water vapor and forms contrails. Contrails behind aircrafts are among the most evident of anthropogenic effects on the atmosphere. It is known that contrails dissipate quickly if the atmosphere is dry, vanishing within a few minutes or even seconds. If the atmosphere is humid enough, the contrails may persist and may turn into contrail-cirrus clouds. Global aviation is responsible for 2.5% of global anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. It is estimated that, together, CO2 and non-CO2 aviation emissions account for approximately 3.5% of warming. We welcome studies that analyze aircraft emissions, aviation-induced clouds, cirrus clouds, changes, radiative forcing estimates, as well as studies that assess mitigation options for reducing the climate impact of air traffic, during periods with or without air travel restrictions and disruptions.

Prof. Dr. Kostas Eleftheratos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • air traffic
  • contrails
  • cirrus clouds
  • changes
  • radiative forcing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Theory of Contrail Formation for Fuel Cells
Aerospace 2021, 8(6), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace8060164 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 826
Abstract
The theory of contrail formation for fuel cells is derived. It is a variant of the well-known Schmidt-Appleman theory. The contrail factor or G-factor for fuel cells is much larger than for jet engines, such that condensation of the exhaust water vapour can [...] Read more.
The theory of contrail formation for fuel cells is derived. It is a variant of the well-known Schmidt-Appleman theory. The contrail factor or G-factor for fuel cells is much larger than for jet engines, such that condensation of the exhaust water vapour can happen even at the Earth’s surface in sufficiently cold (a few degrees above zero) weather. Contrail formation from fuel cells will occur frequently in the lower troposphere and is unavoidable below moderate temperature limits, in the upper troposphere and in the stratosphere. Despite the high frequency of contrail formation from fuel cells, their climate impact is lower than that of contrails from jet engines. Most fuel cell contrails will be short and those persistent ones will be optically thinner and have on average a shorter lifetime than traditional persistent contrails. From a climate point of view, the introduction of fuel cells into aviation can be recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aircraft Emissions and Climate Impact)
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