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Int. J. Turbomach. Propuls. Power, Volume 3, Issue 3 (September 2018)

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Cover Story (view full-size image) The C-3A test facility is a highly specialized acoustic test facility located at the Central [...] Read more.
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview A Review of New Experimental Technologies for the Development of Advanced Fans with High Bypass Ratio
Int. J. Turbomach. Propuls. Power 2018, 3(3), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijtpp3030021
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 8 August 2018 / Accepted: 13 August 2018 / Published: 21 August 2018
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Abstract
The paper reviews new experimental technologies for the development of advanced fans with high bypass ratios. Most of those developments are carried out in a highly specialized acoustic test facility available at the Central Institute of Aviation Motors (CIAM) in Moscow. The C-3A
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The paper reviews new experimental technologies for the development of advanced fans with high bypass ratios. Most of those developments are carried out in a highly specialized acoustic test facility available at the Central Institute of Aviation Motors (CIAM) in Moscow. The C-3A facility is equipped with an anechoic chamber specifically designed for acoustic, aerodynamic, and mechanical investigations of counter rotating fan models. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Optimization of the LS89 Axial Turbine Profile Using a CAD and Adjoint Based Approach
Int. J. Turbomach. Propuls. Power 2018, 3(3), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijtpp3030020
Received: 27 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 August 2018 / Published: 9 August 2018
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Abstract
The LS89 high pressure axial turbine vane was originally designed and optimized for a downstream isentropic Mach number of 0.9. This profile has been widely used for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation in the open literature but very few attempts have been made
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The LS89 high pressure axial turbine vane was originally designed and optimized for a downstream isentropic Mach number of 0.9. This profile has been widely used for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation in the open literature but very few attempts have been made to improve the already optimized design. This paper presents a sound methodology to design and optimize the LS89 using computer-aided design (CAD) at design conditions. The novelty of the study resides in the parametrization of design space, which is done at the CAD level, and the detailed analysis of the aerodynamic performance of the optimized design. Higher level constraints are imposed on the shape, such as the trailing edge thickness, the axial chord length, and G2 geometric continuity between the suction side and pressure side at the leading edge. The gradients used for the optimization are obtained by applying algorithmic differentiation to the CAD kernel and grid generator and the discrete adjoint method to the CFD solver. A reduction of almost 12% entropy generation is achieved, which is equivalent to a 16% total pressure loss reduction. The entropy generation is reduced while keeping the exit flow angle as a flow constraint, which is enforced via the penalty formulation. The resulting unconstrained optimization problem is solved by the L-BFGS-B algorithm. The flow is governed by the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the one-equation transport Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The optimal profile is compared and benchmarked against the baseline case. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial Excellence in Turbomachinery Research: The Best of the 12th European Turbomachinery Conference
Int. J. Turbomach. Propuls. Power 2018, 3(3), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijtpp3030019
Received: 29 June 2018 / Accepted: 29 June 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
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Open AccessArticle Improved Turbulence Prediction in Turbomachinery Flows and the Effect on Three-Dimensional Boundary Layer Transition
Int. J. Turbomach. Propuls. Power 2018, 3(3), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijtpp3030018
Received: 22 January 2018 / Revised: 13 June 2018 / Accepted: 13 June 2018 / Published: 2 July 2018
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Abstract
For the numerical prediction of turbomachinery flows, a two-equation turbulence model in combination with a proper transition model to account for laminar boundary layers and their transition to turbulence is state of the art. This paper presents the ability of such a method
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For the numerical prediction of turbomachinery flows, a two-equation turbulence model in combination with a proper transition model to account for laminar boundary layers and their transition to turbulence is state of the art. This paper presents the ability of such a method (k-ω + γ-ReΘ) for turbulence prediction and the effect on three-dimensional boundary layer behavior. For this purpose, both applied models (turbulence and transition) are improved to better account for turbulence length scale effects and three-dimensional transition prediction (Bode et al., 2014 and 2016), since these are the main deficiencies in predicting such kinds of flows. The improved numerical method is validated and tested on existing turbine cascades with detailed experimental data for the viscous regions and additionally on a low-speed axial compressor rig where wake-induced transition takes place. Full article
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