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Vet. Sci., Volume 2, Issue 2 (June 2015) – 5 articles , Pages 43-110

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Open AccessReview
Experimental Animal Models of Arteriovenous Malformation: A Review
Vet. Sci. 2015, 2(2), 97-110; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci2020097 - 19 Jun 2015
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2915
Abstract
Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital lesions that cause brain haemorrhage in children and young adults. Current treatment modalities include surgery, radiosurgery and embolization. These treatments are generally effective only for small AVMs. Over one third of AVMs cannot be treated safely and effectively [...] Read more.
Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital lesions that cause brain haemorrhage in children and young adults. Current treatment modalities include surgery, radiosurgery and embolization. These treatments are generally effective only for small AVMs. Over one third of AVMs cannot be treated safely and effectively with existing options. Several animal models have been developed with the aims of understanding AVM pathophysiology and improving treatment. No animal model perfectly mimics a human AVM. Each model has limitations and advantages. Models contribute to the understanding of AVMs and hopefully to the development of improved therapies. This paper reviews animal models of AVMs and their advantages and disadvantages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Models of Disease)
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Open AccessCommunication
Intranuclear Inclusions in Renal Tubular Epithelium in Immunodeficient Mice Stain with Antibodies for Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 L1 Protein
Vet. Sci. 2015, 2(2), 84-96; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci2020084 - 11 Jun 2015
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3216
Abstract
The kidneys from six immunodeficient mice examined by Cerberus Sciences and the Animal Resources Centre, displayed karyomegaly with pale eosinophilic, intranuclear inclusions upon histopathological examination. Electron microscopy performed on kidney tissue from 5/6 mice demonstrated margination of the chromatin in large nuclei. Laboratory [...] Read more.
The kidneys from six immunodeficient mice examined by Cerberus Sciences and the Animal Resources Centre, displayed karyomegaly with pale eosinophilic, intranuclear inclusions upon histopathological examination. Electron microscopy performed on kidney tissue from 5/6 mice demonstrated margination of the chromatin in large nuclei. Laboratory tests were used to detect nucleic acid of papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, circoviruses and anelloviruses (4/6 mice), a specific PCR was used to detect murine polyomavirus (1/6), and a panel of serological tests was used to detect seroconversion to major murine pathogens (1/6). All molecular and serological tests were negative. Immunohistochemistry using polyclonal anti-bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) L1 antibody, Camvir monoclonal anti-papillomavirus antibody (directed against the seven amino acids GFGAMDF found in human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 L1 protein), a commercially available mixture of two monoclonal antibodies, anti-BPV-1 L1/1H8 + Camvir antibodies, and a monoclonal anti-Hsc70 antibody revealed specific, positive staining of murine renal tubular epithelial intranuclear inclusions in 6/6 mice using the anti-BPV-1 L1 containing antibodies only. Methyl pyronin green, PAS and Feulgen histochemical reactions revealed that the intranuclear inclusions did not consist of RNA, DNA or carbohydrate. An immunohistochemical method now exists that can be used to confirm and evaluate suspected cases of murine inclusion body nephropathy. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Governance and One Health: Exploring the Impact of Federalism and Bureaucracy on Zoonotic Disease Detection and Reporting
Vet. Sci. 2015, 2(2), 69-83; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci2020069 - 13 May 2015
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1942
Abstract
The merits of One Health have been thoroughly described in the literature, but how One Health operates in the United States federal system of government is rarely discussed or analyzed. Through a comparative case-study approach, this research explores how federalism, bureaucratic behavior, and [...] Read more.
The merits of One Health have been thoroughly described in the literature, but how One Health operates in the United States federal system of government is rarely discussed or analyzed. Through a comparative case-study approach, this research explores how federalism, bureaucratic behavior, and institutional design in the United States may influence zoonotic disease outbreak detection and reporting, a key One Health activity. Using theoretical and empirical literature, as well as a survey/interview instrument for individuals directly involved in a past zoonotic disease outbreak, the impacts of governance are discussed. As predicted in the theoretical literature, empirical findings suggest that federalism, institutional design, and bureaucracy may play a role in facilitating or impeding zoonotic disease outbreak detection and reporting. Regulatory differences across states as well as compartmentalization of information within agencies may impede disease detection. However, the impact may not always be negative: bureaucracies can also be adaptive; federalism allows states important opportunities for innovation. While acknowledging there are many other factors that also matter in zoonotic disease detection and reporting, this research is one of the first attempts to raise awareness in the literature and stimulate discussion on the intersection of governance and One Health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
Open AccessArticle
Alkylation and Carbamylation Effects of Lomustine and Its Major Metabolites and MGMT Expression in Canine Cells
Vet. Sci. 2015, 2(2), 52-68; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci2020052 - 24 Apr 2015
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2394
Abstract
DNA Alkylation is thought to be the reason for the efficacy of lomustine while carbamylation has been implicated as the cause for the side effects seen with lomustine treatment such as hepatotoxicity. In the alkylation study we show that lomustine and its metabolites [...] Read more.
DNA Alkylation is thought to be the reason for the efficacy of lomustine while carbamylation has been implicated as the cause for the side effects seen with lomustine treatment such as hepatotoxicity. In the alkylation study we show that lomustine and its metabolites form similar levels of the DNA adducts N7 hydroxyethylguanine and O6 hydroxyethyldeoxyguanosine. In terms of carbamylation, lomustine showed greater extent of carbamylation in the canine hepatocytes and lymphoma cell lines. The DNA repair enzyme O6 methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) causes resistance of tumor cells to bifunctional nitrosourea, like lomustine. There is no data available regarding MGMT expression/activity in canine cells or tissues. Our study shows that there is low MGMT activity in the canine lymphoid cell line 17–71 while the GL-1 cells did not show any detectable enzyme activity or mRNA expression. The MGMT enzyme activity measured in canine hepatocytes is about 250–350 fmol/mg protein as compared to about 90 fmol/mg protein in 17–71 cells. We also show that MGMT mRNA expression in 17–71 cells and canine hepatocytes positively correlates with its enzyme activity in these cells. Full article
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Open AccessCommunication
Stimulation with Concanavalin-A Induces IL-17 Production by Canine Peripheral T Cells
Vet. Sci. 2015, 2(2), 43-51; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci2020043 - 10 Apr 2015
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3353
Abstract
The characteristics of canine IL-17-producing cells are incompletely understood. Expression of mRNA encoding orthologs of IL-17 and the IL-17 receptor has been documented in tissues from dogs with arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and lymphoma; however, no associations have been found between IL-17 gene [...] Read more.
The characteristics of canine IL-17-producing cells are incompletely understood. Expression of mRNA encoding orthologs of IL-17 and the IL-17 receptor has been documented in tissues from dogs with arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and lymphoma; however, no associations have been found between IL-17 gene expression and disease phenotype in these conditions. Robust assessment of the role of IL-17-producing cells in dogs will require measuring the frequency of these cells in health and disease in balance with other lymphocyte subsets. The aim of this study was to confirm that the T-cell IL-17 response in dogs is evolutionarily conserved. Canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with Concanavalin A with or without polarizing cytokines. We used a canine specific IL-17 ELISA and flow cytometry to identify IL-17-producing T cells. Accumulation of intracellular IL-17 was observed in stimulated CD4 and CD8 T cells. The addition of pro-inflammatory cytokines appeared to enhance polarization of canine CD4 T cells to the Th17 phenotype. Conversely, the addition of IL-2 in the presence of TGF-β resulted in expansion of Treg cells. We conclude that canine IL-17-producing cells behave similarly to those from humans and mice when stimulated with mitogens and polarized with pro-inflammatory or immune regulatory cytokines. Full article
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