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Open AccessArticle

Complementary Parent Components for Pediatric Pain Families: Innovations in Treatment

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Human Development & Family Science, The University of Connecticut, 380-398 Mansfield Rd, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
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School of Nursing, University of Connecticut, 231 Glenbrook Rd., Unit 4026, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
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School of Medicine, University of Connecticut, 200 Academic Way, Farmington, CT 06032, USA
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Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 331 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA
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Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA
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Division of Social Services, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Children 2020, 7(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/children7010004
Received: 29 October 2019 / Revised: 18 November 2019 / Accepted: 2 December 2019 / Published: 1 January 2020
For families with a child with chronic pain, the home environment is the context in which adaptive or maladaptive illness behaviors are developed. Supporting families to effectively cope with their child’s chronic pain is a critical need. This work analyzes intervention approaches from emerging treatment programs to support families coping with pediatric pain that diverge from traditional treatment models by specifically targeting parents. Two novel parent intervention programs are presented that consider caregiver needs in both outpatient and inpatient pain treatment settings: Parents as Coping Coaches and Putting Parents FIRST. These programs are evaluated through comparing parental training components across different stages of treatment. Additionally, the efficacy of Putting Parents FIRST in promoting maintenance of children’s functional gains achieved in intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment is presented, and compared to previous results of the efficacy of Putting Parents FIRST. Specifically, outcomes of 36 children whose parents received the intervention in Putting Parents FIRST were compared to a matched control sample of children whose parents did not receive the parent intervention. Similar to the findings from Parents as Coping Coaches, results indicated that patients whose parents received the intervention maintained/improved program gains in disability, coping, and pain significantly more than patients whose parents did not receive the intervention. Implications for parent-focused intervention development efforts targeting parent and youth functioning in the context of pediatric chronic pain are considered. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic pain; parenting intervention; intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment chronic pain; parenting intervention; intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment
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Russell, B.S.; Guite, J.W.; Homan, K.J.; Tepe, R.M.; Williams, S.E. Complementary Parent Components for Pediatric Pain Families: Innovations in Treatment. Children 2020, 7, 4.

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